Little

AL Franken's future should he wuss out today

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Stuart Smalley   24 members have voted

  1. 1. Al Franken might quit today. Should he receive a pension (assuming he is "eligible")?

    • Yes
      4
    • No
      20

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38 posts in this topic

Vote and comment.  I think the time for a Senator is 6 years, but not positive.  For rtht sake of this lets assume he is.  John Conyers, we know he is so same thing.

I vote no.  What say you, and why?

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Just now, Gotcow? said:

Since when is doing the right thing considered wussing out?     :headscratch:

How shall we record your definition of "the right thing" ?

Cryptic is not clever

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According to the Hiss Act, YES, he will retain his pension and benefits.   Who am I to second guess the law?   Should the Hiss Act be amended to include sexual harassment or groping, nah.   

 

For some reason, I can't seem to CnP, but loss of pension requires a conviction and mostly for federal crimes related to espionage, treason and national security. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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7 mins ago, KnewBee said:

  Who am I to second guess the law?  

 

 

 

You're a good statist.  

Edited by Little

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"A Case for Rewriting the Hiss Act

Posted on July 28, 2017 by Courtney Millian

David Lee, an employee of the Department of Homeland Security, was tasked with investigating a foreign businessman accused of sex trafficking.  Instead of doing his job, however, he did something very different: He solicited and received $13,000 in bribes to report that that the foreign in question was not involved in criminal activity.  This case is not that unusual. In the last ten years, according to a report by the New York Times, immigration enforcement officials have taken over $5 million in bribes. They’ve sold green cards, ignored illegal activity, and even given information to the very drug cartels they are tasked with combating.

Shockingly, however, even after these officials are fired, they remain eligible for federal pensions. This is not unusual, but rather typical: most federal employees convicted of bribery remain eligible for their government pensions.  This was not always the case: The original 1954 version of a statute called the Hiss Act (named for Alger Hiss, a State Department employee who was convicted of passing state secrets to a communist agent) prohibited the payment of a federal pension to a former federal employee who had been convicted of federal law offenses related to bribery and graft, conflict of interest, disloyalty, national defense and national security, and more generally to the exercise of one’s “authority, influence, power, or privileges as an officer or employee of the Government.” In 1961, however, Congress amended the law to prohibit the payment of pensions only for convictions for serious national security-related offenses. The reason for the change was the view that the original version of the Hiss Act went too far, leaving former federal officials (who had already been punished with termination, fines, and imprisonment), as well as their innocent spouses and children, facing the possibility of destitution. The additional punishment supposedly did not fit the crime, unless the crime directly concerned the national security of the United States."

 

In this instance, yeah, but for groping, nah.   

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41 mins ago, hamlet said:

How shall we record your definition of "the right thing" ?

Cryptic is not clever

Well, Little seems to be saying that stepping down is wussing out.

or perhaps he is siding with the gropers and feelers?

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His first gig will be hosting SNL where as a comedian, he will have free reign to say what he wants.

Edited by Riverboat33

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