Evil-Bay

Modified SP

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Hi all,

 

By now everyone one should have heard and used the SP.  Some might have already swapped out the hardware.  But if any of you wondered how exactly the action looked after the hardware changed, i found this video on the tube.

 

Enjoy...

 

 

 

 

 

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That exaggerated action also allows the SP to roll out or flip easier in current. 

 

And before you decide its a "better" action, have you watched baitfish swim? Ever see a bait fish swim with that crazy of a wobble? 

 

Ever consider that a needlefish is a staple in northeast surfcasting. A lure with little to no "action". Ever watch an SS darter swim? They do ok without doing much at all.

 

Just some things to think about ... 

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My hook up rate dropped so hard, was all into the craze a few years ago.  And yes in a controlled scenario the swimming actions appear close, (obviously the sp with inlines has a more exaggerated action) but in current, the plug is very different, and becomes very hard to work, and keep down.  

 

To each their own, but i would much rather have the trebles acting like a keel stabilizing the sp. I just knock off the barb and occasionally cut a hook point clean of on each hook if the actions hot and heavy. 

 

 

Edited by squidwontons33

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23 mins ago, PhilCVG said:

And here is just another little nugget to consider before switching to inline hooks ...

 

 

I wonder if a pencil popper is a good plug for using these inline hooks?  With all the thrashing around, fish often miss the pencils or hit them at odd angles.  I'm guessing that the problem John Skinner had was that fish was hooked oddly or very lightly and came undone.  I've actually avoided in-lines on my pencils and little necks for this reason.  My limited experience with them has been good with minnow plugs like SPs.  Given that I swim those very slow and the action of those plugs is much less erratic than a pencil, it seems that fish have little difficult hitting those plugs.

 

On the topic of in-lines, I've had a terrible experience with the VMCs which seem to rust even if you look at them.  I've had much better luck with the Mustads (cheaper too).

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Glad someone posted the skinner video. 2 years ago i gave the inline vmc's a try and liked them because of the easy release especially with big blues. I tried them on swimmer, poppers and many other lures and plugs.  As time went by i realized how terrible they were if i wanted to actually beach a fish. 

Edited by Rui

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1 hour ago, PhilCVG said:

And here is just another little nugget to consider before switching to inline hooks ...

 

 

 

I snipped one of the hooks off of the treble on a popper I was using and my hookup ratio was still great. 

 

I watched that vid and I dunno what was wrong there...he was fighting the fish til almost the end and they would throw the hook...Dunno how they were doing that with the barb driven home. Very strange. 

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Are you upsizing the rear single hook? I haven't played around with this yet, but my understanding is that a single hook can weigh less than a treble.

Also, if you're having trouble with excessive action a great way to dampen it is to add a little fur or bucktail to the rear single hook. Also works with rear trebles, too. The more bucktail you add the greater the dampening effect on the lure.

I don't know for sure, but perhaps that's why many of the wood plugs you buy have whispy and thin bucktails, to prevent it from dampening the action but also provide keel support?

Edited by TroutGhost

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47 mins ago, HKJonathan said:

I wonder if a pencil popper is a good plug for using these inline hooks?  With all the thrashing around, fish often miss the pencils or hit them at odd angles.  I'm guessing that the problem John Skinner had was that fish was hooked oddly or very lightly and came undone.  I've actually avoided in-lines on my pencils and little necks for this reason.  My limited experience with them has been good with minnow plugs like SPs.  Given that I swim those very slow and the action of those plugs is much less erratic than a pencil, it seems that fish have little difficult hitting those plugs.

 

On the topic of in-lines, I've had a terrible experience with the VMCs which seem to rust even if you look at them.  I've had much better luck with the Mustads (cheaper too).

 

If the fish were just not getting hooked, I'd be more inclined to think it's the action of the lure combined with the hooks causing the misses. But being the fish seem pegged for long periods of time, it's hard not to think it's the hooks.

 

The VMCs have rusted quickly on me also. 

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Trebles catch more for me, but sometimes you have to take a fish home to get your plug back. The SPs belly hook is important also! When I lost the belly hook on this plug last week it barely swam. The couple SPs I canal rigged never caught (in NY)so Im switching them back to two hooks.

IMG_20170912_114514198.jpg

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