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BrianBM

Sturgeon in Long Island Sound?

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Are there sturgeon in the Sound?  I can't see why not, and why they wouldn't cruise around slurping at the bottom in the wake of clammers and draggers and whatnot ... but I've never heard of their being observed there. Now and then they jump, for some obscure fishy reason, inshore on the South Shore, but I've never heard of it happening on the North Shore.

 

Anybody know?

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My grandfather used to talk about catching them off of wading river  up until the mid 60s. Fairly large size ones too.

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12 hours ago, BrianBM said:

The way things are going, the only fish you'll be allowed to keep are sea robins, sculpins and windowpane flounder.

Windowpanes are no-kill in federal waters.  They've been overfished...

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1 hour ago, CWitek said:

Windowpanes are no-kill in federal waters.  They've been overfished...

They use to almost be a guarantee during any fluke trip years ago. Haven't caught one in over 15 years I bet. 

 

Not to continue sidebaring but ? on North Shore Stripers, I know many of them head up the rivers of CT as well as the Hudson. In regard to this Hudson stock do the fish head west, down the E. River then up the Hudson or do they migrate East and around LI? 

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8 mins ago, brushfly said:

They use to almost be a guarantee during any fluke trip years ago. Haven't caught one in over 15 years I bet. 

 

Not to continue sidebaring but ? on North Shore Stripers, I know many of them head up the rivers of CT as well as the Hudson. In regard to this Hudson stock do the fish head west, down the E. River then up the Hudson or do they migrate East and around LI? 

I think that the best answer to this one is "Yes."

 

Some bass winter in and around the Sound.  Some go up into the rivers, particularly the Thames.  Others stay in the sound.  Back when the Northport power plant was running full steam, there were examples of tagged bass that traveled from there to a power plant in Bridgeport (or from Bridgeport to Northport) during the dead of winter, so they move around more than we might think.  Some of the fishermen of my father's generation (Leo Cooper, the inventor of the Goo-Goo Eye line of plugs, was one of them, if I recall correctly) used to catch quality stripers in Greenwich Cove, on the Connecticut side, in February.  And every now and then you'll hear of a lobsterman catching a small bass in the Sound in mid-winter.  Plus, we know that some hang near places like Little Neck Bay, where they can get active in late winter if it's warm enough.

 

When I lived in Greenwich and tagged bass back in the '70s, I'd see two very different patterns from my tag returns.  Most of the "in transit" bass went east, and I'd get returns from haul seiners off Amagansett in late fall, some as late as this time of year, and from other places that made it clear that the fish went around the East End.  Most of my returns came from the Chesapeake, so I'm guessing those were Chesapeake-spawned fish, although a few could have been Hudson-spawned, as some Hudson fish have reportedly been recovered down there.  But some came from Larchmont, New Rochelle, etc. in late November/early December, and I have to believe that those fish were wintering in the Hudson or somewhere around the harbor, although nothing would have stopped them from running through the East River and continuing on to Virginia for the winter.  I never had a fish that I tagged off Greenwich recovered in the Hudson itself, although each spring I used to catch Texas Instruments-tagged fish that descended out of the river into my section of the Sound; in those days, they were ugly, reddish-brown bass with open sores and rotten fins, something I thankfully don't see any more when I fish up there with friends these days,

 

So my guess is that the Hudson fish head west and most,if not all, of the Chesapeake fish head east (assuming that they were in the western or middle Sound in the fall), but I emphasize the "guess."

 

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Was just talking to my buddy who caught a "broken-lined" fish here in the Huntington area, these are supposedly Chessy fish and it dawned on both of us out of the hundreds we caught between us this year (it was a very good striper year) it may have been the only one that had the broken latterals.... I'm sure not all Chessy fish have broken lines as Hudson don't all have straight but noteworthy I guess. 

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Windowpane flounder are now protected?  ....  I had no idea they ever got big enough to be a marketable fish.  Amazing.

 

Come to think about it, it's been years since I saw one myself. 

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5 hours ago, brushfly said:

Was just talking to my buddy who caught a "broken-lined" fish here in the Huntington area, these are supposedly Chessy fish and it dawned on both of us out of the hundreds we caught between us this year (it was a very good striper year) it may have been the only one that had the broken latterals.... I'm sure not all Chessy fish have broken lines as Hudson don't all have straight but noteworthy I guess. 

When I used to do a lot of tagging off the Greenwich/Stamford shoreline, most of my returns suggested Chesapeake fish.

 

Never heard that broken lines indicated a Chesapeake fish; I always associated them with minor injuries to the young bass (and with white bass/striped bass hybrids).  Interesting to hear that you had a very good year.  On the north side of the Sound, at least in the area where I fish, the season had its moments, but overall was down quite a bit from last year, enough so that I didn't go up too much, as the folks who I fish with said it wasn't worth the ride.

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4 hours ago, BrianBM said:

Windowpane flounder are now protected?  ....  I had no idea they ever got big enough to be a marketable fish.  Amazing.

 

Come to think about it, it's been years since I saw one myself. 

They're part of the New England Multispecies groundfish complex.

 

There really isn't much of a market; traditionally, they were either sold as lobster bait or sold to low-end markets under the name "brill" (although they really are pretty good eating; I used to keep the bigger ones when the fluking was slow in the late '80s, although you could only fillet the dark side).  But enough were taken as bycatch that the population got fished down  despite the lack of market demand.

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On December 4, 2017 at 4:32 PM, CWitek said:

They're part of the New England Multispecies groundfish complex.

 

There really isn't much of a market; traditionally, they were either sold as lobster bait or sold to low-end markets under the name "brill" (although they really are pretty good eating; I used to keep the bigger ones when the fluking was slow in the late '80s, although you could only fillet the dark side).  But enough were taken as bycatch that the population got fished down  despite the lack of market demand.

From what I can recall they feasted on Sand Eels and they were more prevelent with the cooler water temps we had 10-20 years ago. I don't see as many sand eels as we use too and wonder if the water temps a few degrees above what was "normal" keeps the popluation down, hence the sundials aren't around as much?

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