Steve Coleman

menhaden

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meeting this week to potentially change the menhaden allotment.  hope they shut down omega protein (75% allocation) and keep the maryland allotment (1.6%) used for fishing and lobster baits.

 

more menhaden will lead to more fish.

 

http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/environment/bs-md-menhaden-decision-20171109-story.html

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Noticed a lack of, spring fishing for blues around the delaware bay that it was not near as good as the past two springs. Last spring I remember schools of bunker everywhere around the cape and when they would get within distance it was game on. Most notably one blitz at iri last may where a boat under the bridge was using a landing net to scoop up bunker then dropping them down with a treble hook. Was almost every cast for a few hours that day.  Saw very few pods of bunker around the inside of the cape this spring while fish were around. 

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Good info, I was surprised the article did not mention the filtering qualities and its importance....especially considering that just one adult LY can filter upwards of 300 gallons of water in just one hour....

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Virginia voted yesterday, an 8% total increase in quote was granted to 216000 Tons.  :banghd:

 

Now, some of the good may be that they are required to do a 42% reduction in catch above the bay bridge tunnel (IE in the bay)  Guarantee you will see a lot of Reedville boats along the eastern shore next year....

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Just got this in an email:

 

Big news for a little fish this week. 

The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission (ASMFCvoted on Monday to continue with the status quo for managing the menhaden fishery rather than immediately adopting limits that would take into account menhaden's role in the food chain. They made this decision despite overwhelming public outcry in support of an ecosystem-based approach to menhaden management. This included more than 14,000 CBF supporters who sent letters to ASMFC and a group of extraordinarily dedicated CBF volunteers who boarded buses to Baltimore from all over the region to stand up for menhaden at the meeting.

Menhaden, often called "the most important fish in the sea," are a crucial link in the Bay's ecosystem—they are, in many ways, the foundation of the food web, serving as vital food for striped bass, osprey, and other important Bay species. But the Chesapeake Bay has not been seeing the number of young menhaden it did historically, raising concerns for anyone who cares about the Bay's health. The catch limits would have served as guardrails for the commercial fishery by ensuring enough of these forage fish are left to serve their critical role in the food chain.

In spite of this disappointing news, I am happy to report a significant victory for the Bay. Near the end of the two-day meeting, the Commission voted to decrease the Chesapeake Bay reduction fishery cap by 41.5 percent. Reducing the cap keeps menhaden harvests by the reduction fishery in the Chesapeake Bay from growing, protecting an important nursery ground for both menhaden and striped bass.

In fact, CBF's very own Allison Colden stepped in to passionately and successfully argue that because of ongoing ecological concerns the Bay's menhaden needed further protection with a reduction in the fishery cap. Click here to read this WYPR article about it. 

While the ASMFC commission members decided to delay the ecosystem-based approach to managing "the most important fish in the sea," they voiced broad support for adopting this management approach when their analysis is complete in two years. Rest assured, with you by our side, we're going to hold them to it!

Thank you, as always, for your steadfast support on this important issue,

Chris Moore
Senior Regional Ecosystem Scientist
Chesapeake Bay Foundation

 

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I don't buy the spin.  I see this as a total loss.  Va allottment increased 8%.  Since they can't net as many in the bay as before they will vacuum the ocean clean to hit their new bigger number.   

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5 hours ago, Steve Coleman said:

I don't buy the spin.  I see this as a total loss.  Va allottment increased 8%.  Since they can't net as many in the bay as before they will vacuum the ocean clean to hit their new bigger number.   

agree 100%

 

...and the "by-catch" too

Edited by luckyOC

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