UncleJohn

Bending Eel Tins

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I picked up some eel tins from one of the fishing shows last spring.     I rigged them up with some eels that I had in the freezer, but I haven't had much luck with them so far.   I have heard that you are supposed to bend the tins to get the right action.     How do you know when it is bent right.   Do you bend them after they are rigged or before you rig them with eels?   I saw a thread with an tin that was broken in half, so I was wondering how you bend the tins and how do you know how much you can bend the tins with out fatiguing the metal.  I have one tin that is made of tin and another that is made of lead.   Is there a difference for bending tins made of Tin or Lead.      Any info would be greatly appreciated.

 

Thanks in Advance ..

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I use to bend mine evenly right behind the grommet . Then take the rigged eel to a lake and see how they swim. May have to do a little tweaking to get the swimming action right. 

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What do you use to bend the tin?   I assume that you are trying to get a a nice side to side action.   I haven't seen how mine swim because I only take them out at night.   I will have to take mine to the local pond and see how they swim.    What kind of retrieve speed do you use with the eel tins?  I'm kinda trying to fish mine slow, but I don't know how slow I can go without it losing the desired action.

 

Thanks for the info 

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i bend mine two ways. first, i bend from the hook eye forward up using a table edge. then i bend the line tie area down slightly using a bench clamp. i bend all of the squids roughly the same. i do try and test swim everyone and adjust accordingly but i don't always get the chance to do that. i can tell by feel if the rigger is swimming correctly. if i don't like what i feel i may l adjust it while i'm fishing but most frequently i use another and adjust it when i can see (during the day). the pic shows roughly how i bend them to start. it can certainly get more extreme than the pic.

 

IMG_5065.JPG

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tin s/b easier to bend than lead. you'll also hear/feel a crunch when you bend tin. 

 

i guess it would be possible to break one with repeated bending but i've never had that issue in close to 30 years of fishing rigged eels.

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2 hours ago, Drew C. said:

i bend from the hook eye forward up using a table edge. then i bend the line tie area down slightly using a bench clamp.

Thanks, Drew, A picture is worth a thousand words.    One question, why do you bend the hook eye forward.   I cant see how that would affect the action, as I only use the eye to tie down the stinger hook. 

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1 hour ago, Drew C. said:

tin s/b easier to bend than lead. you'll also hear/feel a crunch when you bend tin. 

 

i guess it would be possible to break one with repeated bending but i've never had that issue in close to 30 years of fishing rigged eels.

 

So, I guess I shouldn't worry if makes crunchy sounds when I bend it ...

 

Thanks, I would have definately been worried if you did not tell me to expect that ....

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2 hours ago, UncleJohn said:

Thanks, Drew, A picture is worth a thousand words.    One question, why do you bend the hook eye forward.   I cant see how that would affect the action, as I only use the eye to tie down the stinger hook. 

probably confusing how i said it. i don't the hook eye forward - i bend the entire squid just forward of the hook eye. i turn the tin upside down, place it flat on a table so the hook eye touches the table edge and then bend the squid. once that's done i bend the tip down a little bit.

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22 hours ago, Drew C. said:

probably confusing how i said it. i don't the hook eye forward - i bend the entire squid just forward of the hook eye. i turn the tin upside down, place it flat on a table so the hook eye touches the table edge and then bend the squid. once that's done i bend the tip down a little bit.

Oh, ok that makes sense...   I ended up bending my Eel Tin with a pair of pliers.   The bend was more pronounced than the picture above but it still didn't have that much side to side action.     I wonder if I could have bent it too much.   Unfortunately, I lost my tin and riggie on a short last night that hit the teaser.   Cut me off on the rocks, but I still have one more TIn, but it is the one made of lead.   I think I like the Tin better than the Lead with all the beach replenishment going on.   Getting harder to find deep water.    Gonna have to get more Tins from the Dan the Tin man.   

 

Thanks for your all your help.   I really appreciate all the tips  

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On 11/10/2017 at 11:27 AM, UncleJohn said:

I saw a thread with an tin that was broken in half, so I was wondering how you bend the tins and how do you know how much you can bend the tins with out fatiguing the metal. 

That was probably my thread. That tin, which wasn't for using with eels, turned out to be made of cheap pot metal, so it didn't bend, it snapped

 

I bend them before rigging then tune them after. Unless you're better at it then I am you'll need to swim it under a light or in the daylight to get it just right.

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Guess I will have to take my eel tins to the local pond during the day.   Feel a little silly going to the local pond with my 10 ft surf rod, but I definitely need more practice ...    

 

Thanks for the info

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used to bend them in the boards of the boardwalk..So many variables.small tin squids for small eels reeled slow, larger blended metals for larger eels retrieved at a better pace..some work better in bigger water some  have actions better suited to calmer ones..Common sense is the rule here..

Ideally I liked my eels to make a snake like wiggle upon the retrieve one that would almost produce a thumplike feel in the rod.i worked it at a pretty good pace.this thumping caused the fish to come from a distance to crush this enemy/prey causing bone jarring strikes.Thats why they where so much fun.

 

 

Edited by NIB

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1 hour ago, NIB said:

used to bend them in the boards of the boardwalk..So many variables.small tin squids for small eels reeled slow, larger blended metals for larger eels retrieved at a better pace..some work better in bigger water some  have actions better suited to calmer ones..Common sense is the rule here..

Ideally I liked my eels to make a snake like wiggle upon the retrieve one that would almost produce a thumplike feel in the rod.i worked it at a pretty good pace.this thumping caused the fish to come from a distance to crush this enemy/prey causing bone jarring strikes.Thats why they where so much fun.

 

 

That thumping is key. You know pretty darn quick when it’s swimming right. 

 

Frm time to time I’ve done very well on a first cast with a rigger. They’re great for picking off that lone fish that is hanging out at a spot. 

 

And yes, they don’t hit riggers, they usually crush them. 

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