onthefly

HOMEMADE HOOKS

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anyone ever make your own hooks? would like to do something like the hogy 12/0 barbarian  that go with the 10 and 12 inch classic eels they make the factory ones cost a lot and can't find a cheaper option

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Got my bends in prototype made this is 1/16 309L not heavy enough for hook will try higher carbon stainless like 301 in 1/8 oe maybe straight steel I figure if i can hold up a 30 lb weight without it straightening I might have something will update thread with this experiment 

20171107_185327.jpg

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Seems to me that there are two ways to go. The hardness of steels varies with the carbon content...more carbon, harder steel. If I were doing this, I would start with 01 water hardening steel, which is cheap and readily available in a large range of shapes, and will get file hard  by simply heating cherry red and plunging into water. This would be too brittle to use as a hook, but you would then temper it to whatever hardness you think is appropriate. There have been many advances in steel, but most good wood carving knives are still made from 01. The biggest problem will be corrosion resistance, which also varies with carbon content (more carbon, more corrosion). This could probably be handled with some of the instant galvanizing products on the market, although high carbon steels are prone to hydrogen embrittlement, which can be caused by galvanizing, but I'm not familiar with the chemistry involved in the instant products, so don't know whether it would present a problem or not. 

 

There are a lot of exotic stainless steels on the market that are aimed at the knife making crowd, but they are expensive and available in limited shapes...mostly flat...go figure.

 

So my second choice would be one of the stainless steels, such as 304 0r 316, which are very stainless but cannot be heat treated. More carbon, better heat treatment...less carbon, more stainless. They can, however, be strain hardened, and there are many grades of stainless spring wire that are drawn to very high tensile strengths. It would be possible to use stainless spring wire and form it to the shape you want, then further work harden it by pounding it flat with a hammer, then grinding it to the shape you want (if you can still file it, it ain't hard enough). 

 

Anyway, this seems to me to be a worthwhile and interesting experiment. Just remember, hooks go back a long  way, and so does steel. Hook manufacturers aren't doing anything magical, they're just manufacturing a product with materials that are readily available in industrialized economies. 

 

Happy experimenting, and good luck. 

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all great advise thanks I did look into spring steel I think it is mostly 302 and I think can be ordered in a coil I can cold work it and surface harden it I have no metal working experience put will be watch videos and take ant advice I can get

Thanks Jim 

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Here is prototype of 10/0 jig hook made with 0.10 inch 2.54mm 302 spring hard tempered stainless made with basic pliers , bench vice, grinder and final point sharpening with dremel and 240 grit sand paper the point is triangle used a propane torch to heat wire for bends when I get better tools can make bends even better . the wire is pretty stiff and not easily bent. surfaced hardened in vise. should hold up to at least 20 lb fish not much deformation at all when hung a 30 lb dumbbell to the bend now to make another 15 or so and mold for lead wt like the ones hogy makes  I also make screw eye to put on out of 0,03 inch stainless wire

10-0 HOOK.jpg

Edited by onthefly
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only problem I see with this approach is that although 302 can be work hardened to a tensile strength of around 180Ksi if memory serves, it is not very hard (around RC 45), so is hard to sharpen well. Plain old water hardening (or oil hardening) high carbon steel is easy to form, can be heat treated to very high numbers (RC 60+) and will take an amazingly fine edge. If the stainless doesn't work out, I'd try the straight high carbons next. Your biggest challenge would be corrosion resistance, but nothing is free. 

Youre embarked on a noble experiment. Good luck.

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The 302 seams pretty sharp i am forming the loop first and then hammer hardening the point end and using my bench grinder while rotating the straight shank at this point form a nice conical point finish up with higher grade sand paper then make all the bends flattening those bends with hammer finish with wet sand  up to 500 the entire hook I definitely see increase stiffness and hardness after working it. the steel was cheap so worth a try will try the high carbon if hooks open up on a good fish heck the carbon is even cheaper thx 

also I have been oil quenching after using the torch to make bends do you think there is any carbon migration into the 302 after quenching seams to be much stiffer after that

Edited by onthefly
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