163 posts in this topic

6 hours ago, lonellr said:

In the end, the tins would be powder coated or airbrushed and a light epoxy coat, or clear automotive coat.

If you plan on coating the lures with anything, don't use tin...there's no reason for it. If you need the lighter weight of tin to make a lure swim, add color by using different colors of bucktail or saddle hackle on the tail hook...but please don't paint the tin :scared: Tin works because of it's natural lifelike essence...it has a glow that looks alive...not like chrome plated lures. To cover tin with paint is sacrilege :b:  

 

Sorry...don't mean to get preachy...I get a little twitchy when people talk about painting tin...just like when someone wants to paint a beautifully aged antique oak dresser or table...a little part of me dies inside :o

 

 

 

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Tim quick question since you’ve been down this road. When molding the tin or lead I’ve seen them made with a “wire” or hole with a metal sleeve to attach the hook and the line.  What wire is used like Dan use here or what is the kinda sleeve they use in the hole like a Graves tin? I’m assuming the sleeve is used because tin is softer or it keeps the line from rubbing/cutting off. Thanks for any info you can share.  

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8 hours ago, lonellr said:

I've been looking to buy some tin and it's pretty expensive. $20 for a pound. I wonder if a mixture would suffice (50/50 tin/lead). I've been drawing up designs for now to make a mold.

The way I look at it one could get ata least 8 2oz lures out of it. Depending on how big or small you make them. To get started I figure between bondo, tin, a pot or big spoon to melt it, your gonna spend maybe $40. Cheaper then making wood plugs and if the tin doesn’t come out right melt it back down. I could be wrong, I would do lead stuff but the fumes and safety aspects aren’t worth it to me. I work In a garage and have a ton of old wheel weights lying around. 

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The "sleeve" is a grommet - they are punched and installed after the lure is made. There's a tool, looks like a paper hole punch - just sturdier - they have punch situated like the side cutters on pliers that punches a hole in the tin...and then you put in a grommet (like they use for belly and tail hooks on plugs) and crimp the grommet with the jaws of the same tool. These are used to give your snap a nice, smooth point of contact so that the lure swims easily...and it also adds some strength. The grommet spreads out the load when you really pull on a lure with a thin tin lip...a snap could potentially rip or wear through...the grommet prevents any wear or tearing or hanging up.

 

You can use any stainless wire in your molds...some mold use brass sinker eyes...some guys use preformed wire that you can buy at lure building sites. I'm pretty sure the basic tin lures with a swinging hook use brass sinker eyes or something very similar. Most of the tin lures I've poured have fixed hooks where the hook is placed in the mold and the tin is poured over and around the hook eye and shank.

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22 mins ago, TimS said:

Most of the tin lures I've poured have fixed hooks where the hook is placed in the mold and the tin is poured over and around the hook eye and shank.

That's interesting. A creative person could make a mold where the top of the lure is flat, thereby you wouldn't need a 2 piece mold. Nothing could be simpler. Do you think this would work with jig hooks (because that's what I have)?

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8 hours ago, Fishy Fisher said:

I've heard of people painting tins black and using them at night. I definitely want to try that. Black with glitter. 

 

113_mr_burns_excellent.jpg 

Don't paint tin...it works perfectly at night...it picks up any little bit of light and glows like it's alive. If there's no light there's no glow...there is no upside to painting tin black...bass eat it just fine in the dark the way it is....use black saddle hackle on the tail :) 

 

People that paint "tins" black are mostly talking about tins figuratively...not real tin lures. I've painted various metal lures black to fish at night...guess what? The unpainted ones caught more bass in more situations - AVA jigs, Hopkins...even actual tin lures that I poured myself like eel squids and tin squids. NONE of them worked better than the unpainted lures. Black lures work best at night when the fish are looking at them from below..."tins" painted black fished on the bottom...never been very good :o

 

I've always figured it was because "tins" are productive lures because they catch and reflect some degree of light...this is an attention getter...they don't have the action of a plug...they don't have the surface disturbance of a swimmer or popper...they draw attention by reflecting light - when you paint them black it feels like you are taking away their best attention getting feature :)

 

TimS

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I’ve made a mold or two out of bonds... it will work okay. I use silicone now to make all the molds. It works pretty good and flows a little better than bongo.  Never tried to make to make a lure out of tin. Does it flow as well as lead?

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1 hour ago, TimS said:

If you plan on coating the lures with anything, don't use tin...there's no reason for it. If you need the lighter weight of tin to make a lure swim, add color by using different colors of bucktail or saddle hackle on the tail hook...but please don't paint the tin :scared: Tin works because of it's natural lifelike essence...it has a glow that looks alive...not like chrome plated lures. To cover tin with paint is sacrilege :b:  

 

Sorry...don't mean to get preachy...I get a little twitchy when people talk about painting tin...just like when someone wants to paint a beautifully aged antique oak dresser or table...a little part of me dies inside :o

 

 

 

You are definitely right. I made wood signs for a living and I would get angry when people painted a beautiful 5' mahogany sign all white. I will just make the lure with lead and bring the size down so it's not ridiculous heavy. If I do buy some tin, it will definitely shine!!!

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20 mins ago, Fishy Fisher said:

That's interesting. A creative person could make a mold where the top of the lure is flat, thereby you wouldn't need a 2 piece mold. Nothing could be simpler. Do you think this would work with jig hooks (because that's what I have)?

^^^^This is how many of my tin squid and eel squid molds were made :read:

 

You bend the lure you want to duplicate to it's perfectly flat on the non-keeled side. If it has a hook eye as it would for rigging eels, you need to cut a spot in the "lid" for the hook eye. But that's it - the "lid" is just a piece of hard, flat rubber. You can use the same lid for a number of different molds if the hook eye lines up...or if it doesn't have a hook eye. 

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35 mins ago, Cutbait Bob said:

I’ve made a mold or two out of bonds... it will work okay. I use silicone now to make all the molds. It works pretty good and flows a little better than bongo.  Never tried to make to make a lure out of tin. Does it flow as well as lead?

Bob, I tried making silicone molds...I think it's the nature of the lures I made molds of - they tend to be wide and thin and they have sharp edges and a keel to make them swim. I didn't like the silicone molds I made. Tin does flow well...not sure it's better or worse than lead. When we would pour eel squids we would candle the molds first - hold a candle up to them so they'd warm up and the soot from the candle would coat the mold - it helped with the flow :th:

 

 

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Posted (edited)

You guys ever tried the alumilite silicone molds and the two part resin mix that Larry Dahlberg promotes?  Made some awesome spook copies (I lose ALOT in structure, got too expensive using commercial or custom lures), but the mold wouldn't hold up after 20 or so pours, eventually the silicone would start coming off in little chunks when id pull the blanks.  Not the end of the world, still more economical than tossing a $25 custom wood spook in between pilings and coming back with nothing but braid.

 

 

Edited by bbfish

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3 hours ago, TimS said:

The "sleeve" is a grommet - they are punched and installed after the lure is made. There's a tool, looks like a paper hole punch - just sturdier - they have punch situated like the side cutters on pliers that punches a hole in the tin...and then you put in a grommet (like they use for belly and tail hooks on plugs) and crimp the grommet with the jaws of the same tool. These are used to give your snap a nice, smooth point of contact so that the lure swims easily...and it also adds some strength. The grommet spreads out the load when you really pull on a lure with a thin tin lip...a snap could potentially rip or wear through...the grommet prevents any wear or tearing or hanging up.

 

You can use any stainless wire in your molds...some mold use brass sinker eyes...some guys use preformed wire that you can buy at lure building sites. I'm pretty sure the basic tin lures with a swinging hook use brass sinker eyes or something very similar. Most of the tin lures I've poured have fixed hooks where the hook is placed in the mold and the tin is poured over and around the hook eye and shank.

Thanks for the info

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On 10/27/2017 at 5:01 PM, TimS said:

If you plan on coating the lures with anything, don't use tin...there's no reason for it. If you need the lighter weight of tin to make a lure swim, add color by using different colors of bucktail or saddle hackle on the tail hook...but please don't paint the tin :scared: Tin works because of it's natural lifelike essence...it has a glow that looks alive...not like chrome plated lures. To cover tin with paint is sacrilege :b:  

 

Sorry...don't mean to get preachy...I get a little twitchy when people talk about painting tin...just like when someone wants to paint a beautifully aged antique oak dresser or table...a little part of me dies inside :o

 

 

 

Occasionally a customer will ask for tin lures that are painted. I agree with you. It breaks my heart to cover all the tin with paint.  I do make tin lures that are painted but don't cover all the tin with paint.  The visible tin makes a nice addition to the paint.  These are done that way.5a01d0fd8bd77_TinTeaserswbucktail.thumb.JPG.f6672186394bde689c142c599a033a4c.JPG

 

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