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7 hours ago, TimS said:

A quick search and it turns out that the alloy used in 'tintype' printing does contain some tin...it's just very, very little :o

 

 

 

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Unfortunately, it's the other way around - the lead/antimony (same two things in wheel weights) that you have contains a trace amount of tin. Some folks use this metal for casting bullets...it would be fine to make jigs or sinkers with...but it's not tin. If it were tin each bucket would worth somewhere around $800 - tin is presently right around $8.75/lb. Not sure where that $21.99/lb price in your post came from but make sure you shop around a little before you buy ANYTHING from whatever company you got that price from ;)

 

TimS

 

 

 

I believe price has a lot to do with purity and the supplier. The $8.75/lb and $8.83/lb prices must reflect tin with a high percentage of lead in it. A quick Google search revealed much higher prices for tin 99.9+% pure.

 

 

Tin.jpg

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2 hours ago, TimS said:

They will be harder than pure lead...that makes the paint chip off them a bit more than softer lead jigs when they bang on the rocks.

 

TimS

 

I thought just the opposite, that powder paint bonds to the tin I'm using better than lead. My jigs are cured after powder painting them whether I use soft lead flashing or hard tin type.

I accidently dropped lead jigs that had been powder painted on concrete and when they hit the concrete they dented, forming a void, and the paint chipped off in those spots. On the other hand, the tin jigs I accidently dropped on concrete did not dent or chip. Could just be coincidental.

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1 hour ago, atlantictrader said:

I believe price has a lot to do with purity and the supplier. The $8.75/lb and $8.83/lb prices must reflect tin with a high percentage of lead in it. A quick Google search revealed much higher prices for tin 99.9+% pure.

Not at all - tin is a commodity, the $8.83/lb price is what a pound of 99.9% pure tin is presently worth...as a commodity. If you want to by a ton or pallet, you can get it for $8.83/lb.  If you want to buy 1 pound of it you are buying it from someone that bought it for closer to $8.83/lb...but they bought a ton or a pallet. Consider $8.83/lb the WHOLESALE price...and $22/lb the RETAIL price if that helps - same stuff...except buying by the pound means you gotta pay the person that bought a ton of it the 250% markup that they want :)

 

TimS

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45 mins ago, atlantictrader said:

 

I thought just the opposite, that powder paint bonds to the tin I'm using better than lead. My jigs are cured after powder painting them whether I use soft lead flashing or hard tin type.

I accidently dropped lead jigs that had been powder painted on concrete and when they hit the concrete they dented, forming a void, and the paint chipped off in those spots. On the other hand, the tin jigs I accidently dropped on concrete did not dent or chip. Could just be coincidental.

If you made them with this alloy they aren't tin jigs...just saying :)  I've always found the really hard stuff I've painted to chip off easier than the lead jigs. I'd never paint a lure made of tin so I can't comment on that :eek: Actually, that's not true...I did paint a few tin squids black once...the fish didn't like them :blackeye:  

 

If your soft lead jigs don't chip as easily as the lead/antimony mix, that's great :th:  If you do pour some jigs out of tin one day please don't paint them...it's sacrilegious :scared: Tin makes great lures because of it's natural luster...every time someone paints a pure tin lure it makes me die a little inside ;)

 

TimS 

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Quote

If you do pour some jigs out of tin one day please don't paint them...it's sacrilegious  Tin makes great lures because of it's natural luster...every time someone paints a pure tin lure it makes me die a little inside 

Agree totally but I do make some bucktails that are a combination of painted and unpainted tin.  Makes a great lure.

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I learned a few things recently about metals used for jigs. That's what I like about this forum.

 

Regarding the tin type metal jigs that I have painted, I painted maybe two dozen when I started using that metal. I like to pass a jig or two on to friends and fellow fishermen, and most care less whether the jigs are painted or not, so I stopped painting them because they don't lose their brilliant silver color.

 

I checked a tin type jig for oxidation that was used many trips last season by lightly running a Scotch-Brite pad over it and the jig actually lost some of it's luster. It was still bright silver but not shiny. So whatever the dominant metal is in the composition, it does not exhibit an accelerated rate of oxidation. I've had bank sinkers in my basement for as long and they oxidize pretty well.

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3 mins ago, Dan Tinman said:

Agree totally but I do make some bucktails that are a combination of painted and unpainted tin.  Makes a great lure.

I don't get physically ill with tin lures that are partially painted...fish like contrast..it's when folks cover up the tin completely that I start to get twitchy :freak:

 

TimS

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5 mins ago, atlantictrader said:

so I stopped painting them because they don't lose their brilliant silver color.

Interesting. Everything I've ever poured with lead in it turns dark, flat gray. Even pure tin gets gray and needs shining every so often :)

 

TimS

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Just looked up the alloy used to make Linotype.  It's 4% tin, 12% antimony and 84% lead.  In all probability it's the antimony that slows down the oxidation process.

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5 mins ago, Dan Tinman said:

Just looked up the alloy used to make Linotype.  It's 4% tin, 12% antimony and 84% lead.  In all probability it's the antimony that slows down the oxidation process.

I posted the alloy mix this morning :)

 

The antimony definitely makes it rock hard - I’ve poured tin squids with tin that had just a tiny bit of antimony and you couldn’t bend them without them cracking. And they got much grayer much faster than the pure tin.

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1 hour ago, Dan Tinman said:

Agree totally but I do make some bucktails that are a combination of painted and unpainted tin.  Makes a great lure.

Here's one that I added a red Sharpie permanent marker too. Used it in the recent past at a flounder spot and the marker is holding its own. Red Sharpie on tin type gives the red a translucent ruby color. I've used other color Sharpies on other tin type jigs as well and they all get that translucent look.

Notice the thread wrap is red. That's Danville's optic white 210 denier flat waxed nylon that I color Sharpie red and epoxy over. Been using the same brand/color thread for years and apply whatever Sharpie color I want. Sure beats stocking many different color spools, and the permanent marker doesn't fade or bleed when covered in epoxy.

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