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mybeach

Essential tools for steel stud framing - ? Tips and techniques?

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Never framed with metal before. I get the idea, but some of you have undoubtedly built with this stuff for years.

 

What are they?

 

I don't have a lot of framing to do, but I'd like to do it efficiently. Much of it is actually a knee wall or half wall surrounding a few cabinets.

 

I have 2 walls to frame, and a light soffit in the kitchen. 

 

A little bit down the road I'll have a couple more walls and some pocket doors to build.

 

I have a pair of straight cut snips that work fine.

 

What else?

 

Also, what fasteners do you guys like to use? There will be drywall installed when framing is done.

 

We've already established that tapcons are the way to go for my installation where I have to fasten to the deck or the ceiling.

 

How about for joining the studs to the plate etc?

 

How about the corner? I need to rout wires through the corner also.

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They make screws with a shallow head, phillips drive for metal stud framing.

Those, the snips and a cordless impact driver is all you need.

Usually the corer is just done with the studs

Edited by ted527

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Just kinda makes sense to me, and I think it's code in a condo out here. I am limited to using fasteners that don't penetrate more than 3/4 of an inch also. 

 

I saw a trick fastening plywood nailers to the steel studs for cabinets. Piece of cake.

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Using plain plywood or 2Xs would be a violation. There are backing plates in 16 ga steel I believe just for that purpose. Also there are fire retardant plywood backers available but costly. A comm building I was in a while ago, the inspector had me use 16 ga. smoke pipe for backing for grab bars,  cabinets, etc. Using the truss head sheet metal screws everything held up well. Any wood in the wall was no bueno.

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I've done a LOT of office space partitioning, all using steel stud so here are a few things I've learned....

If you have a lot of cuts to make a $10 Carborundum metal-cutting blade in your chop saw is a must have (makes a mess, do it outside and clean the saw well when you're done)

Given the choice between the straight point and the tap point 1/2" screws, get the straight point on the left in the photo, they grab and peirce faster and better 

screws.jpg.bdd5a0f3b0be79b53be45b08607f419b.jpg

 

The vise grip clamping thing is a nice idea but once you get going you'll find you won't be doing it

A good quality set of offset Wiss cutters is gold

If you're running wires through the studs make damned sure the holes are lined up correctly - do that while you're outside cutting.

Depending on how long the studs are, a 4" block of wood 2x4 screwed into the the middle of the stud provides a bit of bracing for the drywall screws, helps keep the studs wings from flexing.

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21 hours ago, mybeach said:

Just kinda makes sense to me, and I think it's code in a condo out here. I am limited to using fasteners that don't penetrate more than 3/4 of an inch also. 

 

I saw a trick fastening plywood nailers to the steel studs for cabinets. Piece of cake.

2x4's inside the steel studs works nicely for cabinets

 

And get the twinfast drywall screws.  Think that's the name of them, they grab a little better then a regular drywall screw

Actually not sure what they are called but it's what we use when we have to fasten cabinets to steel studs.  It's a double threaded drywall screw

 

 

China-supplier-manufacturers-double-threaded-Decking-Screws.jpg

Edited by DerrickT

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Maybe obvious, but magnetic levels make life easier.

I also like wafer head screws. They dont bulge out the drywall

when you screw it to the studs. Fine thread screws to attach drywall

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