Doozman

Recommendations on a first saltwater fly fishing setup?

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Experienced surfcasting thinking about getting into saltwater flyfishing - looking for recommendations based on the following assumptions:

 

1) No experience flyfishing, fresh or saltwater

2) Don't want to break the bank, already have enough on the fishing credit card with my surfcasting habit!

3) Do want best balance of quality and price, AKA the value proposition.

4) Primarily fishing The Cape and Rhode Island, with some trips to South Shore of Long Island

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You sound like you're local, so take a trip to the Bears Den, in Taunton MA and explain your situation.

They will have many set-ups that will work for you and give you excellent advice.

 

You may want to consider a lesson or two before you head out.

It's a little bit different that the surf rod!

Good Luck!

Edited by BillHassan
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2 hours ago, BillHassan said:

You sound like you're local, so take a trip to the Bears Den, in Taunton MA and explain your situation.

They will have many set-ups that will work for you and give you excellent advice.

 

You may want to consider a lesson or two before you head out.

It's a little bit different that the surf rod!

Good Luck!

x2. They have a huge selection and really competitive prices. They will be able to get you well equipped and they have an indoor casting area so you can get some pointers on casting your new setup.

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Get the following: 9 foot 9 wt Temple fork rod with a Kraken reel. Intermediate, slow sink saltwater fly line.  Half a dozen 1/0 Clouser minnows. Half a dozen 1/0 Lefty's Deceivers. A spool of 20 pound test fluorocarbon line. 

Saltwater fishing is tough on gear. Temple Fork rods have excellent warranties. I advise against buying a used rod because you don't know if it's been whacked with weighted flies. Used reels are a good bet because it's simple to see if they work well. 

If there's a fly fishing club near you join it. Volunteer at club events. Veteran fly fishermen are usually pleased to mentor new fishermen. These clubs often teach fly tying. Fly tying is a craft easily learned and enjoyable. The internet has immense information available to learn fly fishing skills. For example, When I try a new fly pattern, I put my IPad next to my tying vise and watch a tutorial on the fly pattern on youtube.

If you have a good fly shop near you, take Bill Hassan's advice and patronize them. Here in Central CT we have Upcountry sports. I've picked up great used reels and received excellent advice on purchases at internet prices. 

Surf fishing is fun but catching fish with fly gear is a blast. 

Ted

 

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Doozman, also if you are around the upper Cape shoot me a PM, would be glad to take you out and show you a bit. I live near the canal and fish the surrounding areas a lot. Although I am by no means a good teacher of casting, so I would say have someone who really knows how to teach show you the mechanics of that. 

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Check out the Bears for sure. They have a great selection of used gear too. Just make sure you don't buy a rod that is too stiff aka fast if you are trying to learn to fly cast.

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6 hours ago, Doozman said:

Experienced surfcasting thinking about getting into saltwater flyfishing - looking for recommendations based on the following assumptions:

 

1) No experience flyfishing, fresh or saltwater

2) Don't want to break the bank, already have enough on the fishing credit card with my surfcasting habit!

3) Do want best balance of quality and price, AKA the value proposition.

4) Primarily fishing The Cape and Rhode Island, with some trips to South Shore of Long Island

Before you invest... Might want to see and try a little casting yourself. Better still with someone knowledgeable to show you.

Lot's of guys in the early 90's tried it after the release of the movie, "River Runs Through it"  thought it would be great. Never mastered the stroke, had limited success catching fish.  

Gave it up real quickly.

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1 hour ago, Capt.Castafly said:

Before you invest... Might want to see and try a little casting yourself. Better still with someone knowledgeable to show you.

Lot's of guys in the early 90's tried it after the release of the movie, "River Runs Through it"  thought it would be great. Never mastered the stroke, had limited success catching fish.  

Gave it up real quickly.

Agree there.... you can cast inside Bear's Den once you narrowed your search as to fly rods & reels.  Try different rods BUT remember that the right fly line can heavily impact how a rod casts.  I would certainly try to get some training 1st & sample some different ones.

 

Not all TFO rods are fast & they do have a great warranty, so does Echo.

 

Flies are easy in SW... you can probably get by just on different clousers to start ... I have probably caught over 90% of my fish on clousers. YMVV of course as it also depends on the waters you fish.

 

 

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You have one of the greatest resources at your disposal on the east Coast and as so many have said it is the Bearsden, well worth the ride.  

 

There are many people who would love to have a shop like this at their disposal and you should take advantage of that.

Edited by bonefishdick

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