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Wind and wave direction ?

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I'm new to casting for stripers from the shore and I have read it is best to fish beach A with "X" or "Y" wind direction (BFD often comments on wind) , other than how it effects casting right or left handed is there more to it ? Also I fished PI south the other day and after I read a comment that waves there tend to be going north to Newburyport but on the other side of the mouth they head south. How does this effect tactics ?

Thanks

PS

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Some beaches are miserable for fly casting in certain winds. For me, at a minimum that determines if I use an 8 or a 9 weight, or if I go there at all. But wind and waves also effect where bait may pile up against structure from jetties and rocks to something as discreet as a sandbar. That's where it pays to spend a lot of time observing a beach in different conditions and looking for opportunities...

 

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In just about all cases the tide in different areas will run in one direction on incoming and the opposite on the drop. They wind in most cases will not change the direction of the tide. It is rare that that would ever happen. The wind will at times hold water in on a dropping tide and may cause a delay on your reaching a certain location you would normally be able to get to at a certain time in the tide. It may cause a rise faster on an incoming forcing you to vacate sooner than anticipated. With all of that I don't let the wind change how I fish an area pertaining to tide direction. The wind may make me change my position or station on some areas. I just want the wind at my back that is my major priority.

 

The area you mention on each side of the creek if I am understanding it correctly seems to have the tide moving in oppose direction. I would think this may be more due to the way the bottom structure affects the flow than the wind.

 

Tactics are knowing you bottom structure and positioning yourself accordingly in relation to the wind. It doesn't have to get more complicated than that.

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Thanks guys, this gives me something to think about reflecting on my last visit and ideas to try out on my next. I didn't have any luck on the last visit but do think I walked away with a little better understanding of how things work on the shore. Mostly, I'm trying to keep aware of places that I could get in trouble. One was the rocks off gate 6 , it did look like it would be easy for the tide to get behind me if I was not paying attention and out on the point. Followed a couple sand bars that looked like it would be easy to loose direction on too.

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19 minutes ago, JoeGBreezy said:

At your back if it's lite, away from your casting shoulder if it's stiff. All about position.

I'm a decent caster Joe, not great but pretty good or so I'm told. Thing is I'm not so sure where or when to put the fly short of the obvious like a blitz in front of me :) ........didn't see any of them either and the birds where on the beach watching me ! I put in at Gate 6 and walked down to the mouth and back again. Think I would have done better fishing the incoming ,outgoing up in Joppa.

Edited by PS

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4 hours ago, PS said:

other than how it effects casting right or left handed is there more to it ?

Sometimes there's a lot more to it. Wind direction is often an indicator of conditions (you've heard of a nor 'easter, which usually means unpleasant weather). North winds are often associated with cold fronts, which can kill a bite. You have anecdotal rhymes about wind ("Wind from the east, catch fish the least. Wind from the west, fishing is best.") which is true except when it's not, which, according to my journal, is a lot. Some places I fish in early summer love a steady flow from the southwest, and if that suddenly changes, so does the fishing. Fair weather and favorable breezes don't always mean great fishing; I've had some of my best nights in some truly miserable rains and winds.

 

However, your question is best answered not by us, but by you. Note wind conditions (and barometer and moon phase and tide height) whenever you go out. Keep a journal. Correlate your observations over the course of days, months, and years.

 

Then one day you may be be officially recognized as a sharpie.

 

Steve Culton

 

 

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Ps

 

Just to add to the mix above.

 

I will not be popular but the vast majority of Flyguys will chase wind at their back. You get an easy ride but maybe not so many fish. 

Fish location is first on your agenda. If that means battling a head wind so be it.

Its about the physical,challange to.

From  your last post it is apparent you do not know when to look for Bass. You are not alone. It is the most asked quested in every tackle shop in the globe.

You are not going to be lead by the nose by working birds or blitzing fish very often.

 Bass like  current. They like rocky structure. They like sand structure as in sand bars and steep beaches with rips to. They like points and inlets and jetties.

Bait is good too. 

You have to do a lot of educated blind casting in these places. 

You will profit from dawn starts and fishing through the night.

Apart from on hear then a bit of book learning will be worth a lot. Usual suspects like Ray Bonderew and Rick Murphy Fishing for Striped Bass.

Your cast maybe. Ok but is it wind on wrong shoulder ok and head wind ok. It never hurt to get a few casting lessons. If we can't get our fly to the fish we are just having casting practice.

Our Spin bretheren often look down on us as we tend to seek water that is easy rather then water where Bass are likely to be. Can't say I blame them

 

Mike

PS

just a caveat. Some marks will be dangerous for a given wind direction and speed.

 

Not all marks need a wind In your face to fish well.

 

It is as The Fisherman says a discovery of what works and you obtain this priceless info over time. You can't have it all from day one.

The highest quality info is the info you collect yourself. Much BS is spoken of in the sport of fishing and often it is repeated ad nauseam.

But in one season if you get out often enough you may be surprised at how much you get to know and it would not surprise me if it was vastly more then some Guys who have cast a fly a great many years.

Edited by Mike Oliver

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Thanks, I think that's a good idea to do some reading and besides I like books. I think the vastness of the area I'm trying to pick apart (water) is overwhelming at first. I'm an experienced steelheader and trout guy both SH & 2 hander. Looking at a river I have no problem reading the water and structure. It helps when near rocks and jetties but a long shoreline and I'm struggling to read the sandbars for drop offs or whatever. Keep in mind I'm also keeping safety in mind. With casting , I'm working on learning to cast with my off hand, I can shoot line into my back cast or turn around and deliver on the back cast if need be. A head wind I try for line speed and tight loops and hope for the best :) . I'll talk with Shelia H. next time at the shows , maybe another lesson or two salt specific is in order.

 

A question if I may, last outing I made note of areas where it appeared waves or currents from different directions would collide in the surf and there would be visible suspended sediment in the area. Is this indicative of some type of change in structure on the beach bottom ?

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Funny just today I went to a spot where I saw a little surface activity, a place that put a strong wind in my right ear. I could cast lefty or shoot my backcast but the tide was moving in a way that let me make a kind of crappy cast directly into the wind and let the current bring the fly past me and into a sandbar I saw at low tide. Got 8 fish I couldn't actually cast to. Putting the wind at my back in this spot would require me to be nowhere near the fish, and that's the thing. In "Open" Andre Agassi said that a turning point in his game was realizing that not every shot had to be artistically perfect, it just had to get the ball in the right spot. Sometimes as fly casters we want that perfect loop, the perfect cast with the line just flowing from our basket. My biggest fish today was in a gust, cast went maybe 50' and the leader landed in a blown back pile. As I cursed the fly drifted to the sandbar anyways and there ya have it. Concentrate on where the right spots are and find a way to get your fly there. When the waves you saw collided where did the water go? The energy from those opposing waves colliding could have directed water, and any bait that might be there in a certain direction, no? A fun thing to do is cast flies into spots like this and just watch where they go, you can learn some good stuff about spots this way. The like The Fisherman said write it in a journal, you'll accumulate a lot of knowledge about spots that way.

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The wave collision would occur just as the waves broke off shore about 30' I guess and the sediment and disturbance (I'll call it a cloud for lack of better) would be an area about 10' diameter and drift back out to sea. I did make a few cast into one thinking it might have been stripers mixing up the bottom. I thought about putting a floating line on to better track the drift but it was up in the truck. The majority of the outing was more of a recon than a fishing trip , I spent the later part of the out going looking at the beach and trying to ID drop off areas.I see high/low elevations but not sure that is what we are talking about. I was seeing 1' changes not the 4-5 drop offs I was thinking. Did ID deeper pockets around rock structure like off gate 6/7. I'm hoping the book will have photos to give me a better idea. I can't say I had much of a strategy , mostly I looked for rocks and cast as far as I could past the target and retrieve. I can cast 80 + but in the wind real world that gets knocked back to 60-70 and on a bad cast 50. I noted a couple cast did exactly what you said above. I'm lefty, wind was coming off my right. I was casting at a slight angle to the left to drift along the shoreline but the fly and line ended up to my right before I could even start the retrieve. I should have tried to figure out why but I moved on because I was picking up seaweed or whatever it is on every cast. I had a 9 wt. Intermediate on , Airflo Ridge if that matters.

I was hoping there would be other fly guys there so I could just sit back , watch and learn but there was only one guy ....probably a good indicator that mid day outgoing is not the right time :)

 

Edited by PS

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