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Should Texas be Allowed to Use DDT to Control Skitters?

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Should Texas be Allowed to Use DDT to Control Skitters?    21 members have voted

  1. 1. Should Texas be Allowed to Use DDT to Control Skitters?

    • Yes, temporarily because the short-term risks are worth controlling mosquito-borne illnesses. HLM!
      5
    • Yes, but DDT should be allowed to be used more widely to control mosquitos which are increasingly a health risk.
      12
    • No way! Our feathered co-habitants of Earth are far more important than humans. And even a temporary allowance of limited geographic usage would make bird-lovers everywhere sad and demoralized. BLM!
      4

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67 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

Given the clay soil and full saturation, it will take many weeks for Texas to dry out, especially if there are other storm systems brewing. Mosquito transmitted diseases will be a serious health risk in TX for some time. There is one way to control mosquitos over large areas, highly effective and easy to deploy. 

 

So, should Texas be Allowed to Use DDT to Control Skitters? 

Edited by tomkaz

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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologists fed large doses of DDT to captive bald eagles for 112 days and concluded that “DDT residues encountered by eagles in the environment would not adversely affect eagles or their eggs,” according to a 1966 report published in the “Transcripts of 31st North America Wildlife Conference.”

The USFWS examined every bald eagle found dead in the U.S. between 1961-1977 (266 birds) and reported no adverse effects caused by DDT or its residues.

One of the most notorious DDT “factoids” is that it thinned bird egg shells. But a 1970 study published in Pesticides Monitoring Journal reported that DDT residues in bird egg shells were not correlated with thinning. Numerous other feeding studies on caged birds indicate that DDT isn’t associated with egg shell thinning.

In the few studies claiming to implicate DDT as the cause of thinning, the birds were fed diets that were either low in calcium, included other known egg shell-thinning substances, or that contained levels of DDT far in excess of levels that would be found in the environment – and even then, the massive doses produced much less thinning than what had been found in egg shells in the wild.

So what causes thin bird egg shells? The potential culprits are many. Some that have been reported in the scientific literature include: oil; lead; mercury; stress from noise, fear, excitement or disease; age; bird size (larger birds produce thicker shells); dehydration; temperature; decreased light; human and predator intrusion; restraint and nutrient deficiencies.

Most of this evidence was available to the Environmental Protection Agency administrative judge who presided over the 1971-1972 hearings about whether DDT should be banned. No doubt it’s why he ruled that, “The use of DDT under the regulations involved here does not have a deleterious effect on freshwater fish, estuarine organisms, wild birds or other wildlife.”

Yet it’s the myths, not the facts that endure. Why? The answer is endless repetition. The environmentalists who wanted DDT banned have constantly repeated the myths over the last 40 years, while most of DDT’s defenders lost interest after the miracle chemical was summarily banned in 1972 by EPA administrator William Ruckleshaus.

 

http://www.foxnews.com/story/2006/07/06/bald-eagle-ddt-myth-still-flying-high.html

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From listening to the libs here, I thought the toxic waste plume from the poor zoning law chemical plant fire would have killed all the skeeters.  By all means, dump on the DDT too if it's needed.  Hopefully the EPA stays out of the way and lets people do what needs to be done.

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The only thing banning DDT accomplished was the deaths of a whole lot of people in sub-saharan Africa and elsewhere.

 

Rachel Carson's book was a total fraud from the jump and has been totally discredited.

 

Classic example of the kind of fake enviro "science" that we read about in here every day from our resident climate hysterics.

 

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1 hour ago, Wigeon said:

The only thing banning DDT accomplished was the deaths of a whole lot of people in sub-saharan Africa and elsewhere.

 

Rachel Carson's book was a total fraud from the jump and has been totally discredited.

 

Classic example of the kind of fake enviro "science" that we read about in here every day from our resident climate hysterics.

 

 

Exactly! 

I think you were the one that clued me in a few years back.

I was shocked to find what I did once I looked into it. 

 

DDT pretty much wiped out malaria when it was in use. A lot of countries didn't ban it and have been using it non-stop. Even here in the US it has been used occasionally. 

 

There was a lot of talk about bringing it back when the Zica scare started. 

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I get triggered every time I look out my back window and see the Rachel Carson Wildlife Reserve.  It only gets worse when I fish in the marsh.  I demand that it be re-named.  The Lyme Disease Breeding Habitat would be just as appropriate.

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some years ago in Eastern Mass the state used Malathion for mosquito control...I forget the reason, EEE or west nile was going on and Malathion was considered the nuclear option...well all i remember was after they sprayed, I litterally didn't see a single mosquito for the rest of the season...

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15 minutes ago, jettyjockey18 said:

some years ago in Eastern Mass the state used Malathion for mosquito control...I forget the reason, EEE or west nile was going on and Malathion was considered the nuclear option...well all i remember was after they sprayed, I litterally didn't see a single mosquito for the rest of the season...

So then why use DDT if Malathion will do the job?

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1 hour ago, Jay Dog said:

So then why use DDT if Malathion will do the job?

Any one pesticide will eventually breed a resistant population of mosquitos.  A better strategy is a little of this and a little of that in quantities and times when most effective.  Integrated pest control aims to manage the problems without letting any one pesticide dominate.

The question I ask is why DDT can not be a part of sensible integrated pest management.  I believe the answer to that is that there are still too many scientists working today who were part of the ban all DDT movement.  It would be too embarrassing for them to admit they were wrong and just so darn confusing the the public.

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1 hour ago, zybathegeek said:

We have her and the rest of the bambi lovers to thank for the spread of lyme.

 

atlas_Vyas54aw.png

Two of our four sons have advanced, 5-10+ year Lyme (plus bartonella and babesia), so don't get me started....

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