Sparky

Outdoor ant control

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We keep finding ants around the sink and the windows above the sink. These are the little ones my mom called sugar ants. 

We've laid out traps for a couple of weeks and sprayed but they keep coming back.

Outside the house there are alot of them and I'm pretty sure they're coming in from outside. 

I've sprinkled Sevin around the foundation twice, but nothing has really changed.

 

I would like to nuke these little **** ers to make a certain little lady happy.

I've got a pump up sprayer and a grudge. 

Recommendations on what pesticide I should use and how to apply?

Thanks :howdy:

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Sparky have the same issue,

find one inside who looks lost every so often,

but they are partying hard on my deck,

spray seems to knock them out for a day or so, then they are back and happy.

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3 minutes ago, giggyfish said:

Believe it or not I've had best results with a diluted dawn dish soap mixture in a spray bottle. Those little bastards are persistent 

 

Dawn is deadly. Melts the exoskeleton.

Stop with the Sevin. Nothings more deadly to bees.

Need to be proactive. Seek and destroy.

Find the nest and kill it. Most OTC sprays are a joke anymore.

Nothing works better on Stinkbugs than Dawn.

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2 minutes ago, Sparky said:

I'm through being a nice guy. Environment be damned. 

 

You're in luck, because are resident pedantic sweetheart -- me! :D -- has just the thing for you! And you won't have to poison the earth to make it work. 

 

Boric acid is the thing you want. It will take a little bit of time, but it will kill the queen, and that is the only way to blow up an ant colony. Killing the individual ants is like playing whack-a-mole: you can kill gazillions of them, but more keep coming. 

 

This is from You Bet Your garden: :howdy: 

 

Our good friends at the BIRC in Berkeley California, specialists in non-toxic pest control (www.birc.org), have a number of neat tricks forgetting rid of ants. If a line of them is invading your kitchen, wipe them up with a soapy sponge from the furthest one out, following them back to where they're entering—the soap removes the chemical trail they've laid down for other ants to follow. Then seal the crack where they came in. If it's an area that can't be sealed, spray some boric acid dust—often available as 'roach powder'—into the area. The boric acid will kill some ants directly by drying them out, and others when they later groom themselves. And if you get lucky, some will make it back to the nest alive, where the boric acid may be able to wipe out the colony.

 

Outdoors, flooding often works to rid an area of ants, but boiling water isn't necessary; just keep flooding their mounds on a regular basis and they should eventually move to the outskirts of the property.

 

But the best solution is to put out baited Traps that contain a low dose of boric acid. The ants take the bait back to the nest, where the slow acting poison—very toxic to some insects, almost non-toxic to us mammals—can kill the entire colony.  Here's a detailed description of a pet-safe, ant-deadly trap design from the BIRC:

  1. Mix together: 3 cups water; 1 cup sugar; and four teaspoons of boric acid. DO NOT USE MORE BORIC ACID THAN THIS! A higher dose would kill the ants immediately; and you need them to live long enough to get the bait back to the main colony.  If you see a lot of dead ants around your traps, you used too much!
  2. Get six jars with tight fitting screw-cap lids;punch some holes in the lids with a Phillips head screwdriver. Loosely pack the jars about half full with cotton balls or batting, then saturate the cotton with your boric acid sugar water.
  3. Screw the lids on tight and draw 'skull and crossbones' on the jar, just to be safe.  
  4. Leave the jars out where you see ants (d'uh!). Most importantly, do NOT kill any ants from here on in—you have to let them travel to and from the jars safely so they can take the bait back to the colony.  
  5. Not all ants are sugar-suckers; some species prefer protein. If your ants aren't attracted to the sugary bait, make a new batch using cat or dog food. If you have carpenter ants, use wet,rotting wood. Experiment with the boric acid levels until you get the dose right.
  6. Oh, and if the ants aren't doing any damage, consider just leaving them alone. Ants in the house can be VERY beneficial, preying on flea larvae, silverfish and clothes moths.  Outdoors, they fight a much more important foe—termites, their natural enemies. A yard full of anthills is a very effective barrier to termite invasion. (Talk about 'turf wars'!)

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constant battle for me...I have a section of the house that was an addition. its over crushed rock and a partial old foundation. ...you could crawl under the whole section very easily...pain in the fuqn ass.

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25 minutes ago, Belmo said:

 

You're in luck, because are resident pedantic sweetheart -- me! :D -- has just the thing for you! And you won't have to poison the earth to make it work. 

 

Boric acid is the thing you want. It will take a little bit of time, but it will kill the queen, and that is the only way to blow up an ant colony. Killing the individual ants is like playing whack-a-mole: you can kill gazillions of them, but more keep coming. 

 

This is from You Bet Your garden: :howdy: 

 

Our good friends at the BIRC in Berkeley California, specialists in non-toxic pest control (www.birc.org), have a number of neat tricks forgetting rid of ants. If a line of them is invading your kitchen, wipe them up with a soapy sponge from the furthest one out, following them back to where they're entering—the soap removes the chemical trail they've laid down for other ants to follow. Then seal the crack where they came in. If it's an area that can't be sealed, spray some boric acid dust—often available as 'roach powder'—into the area. The boric acid will kill some ants directly by drying them out, and others when they later groom themselves. And if you get lucky, some will make it back to the nest alive, where the boric acid may be able to wipe out the colony.

 

Outdoors, flooding often works to rid an area of ants, but boiling water isn't necessary; just keep flooding their mounds on a regular basis and they should eventually move to the outskirts of the property.

 

But the best solution is to put out baited Traps that contain a low dose of boric acid. The ants take the bait back to the nest, where the slow acting poison—very toxic to some insects, almost non-toxic to us mammals—can kill the entire colony.  Here's a detailed description of a pet-safe, ant-deadly trap design from the BIRC:

  1. Mix together: 3 cups water; 1 cup sugar; and four teaspoons of boric acid. DO NOT USE MORE BORIC ACID THAN THIS! A higher dose would kill the ants immediately; and you need them to live long enough to get the bait back to the main colony.  If you see a lot of dead ants around your traps, you used too much!
  2. Get six jars with tight fitting screw-cap lids;punch some holes in the lids with a Phillips head screwdriver. Loosely pack the jars about half full with cotton balls or batting, then saturate the cotton with your boric acid sugar water.
  3. Screw the lids on tight and draw 'skull and crossbones' on the jar, just to be safe.  
  4. Leave the jars out where you see ants (d'uh!). Most importantly, do NOT kill any ants from here on in—you have to let them travel to and from the jars safely so they can take the bait back to the colony.  
  5. Not all ants are sugar-suckers; some species prefer protein. If your ants aren't attracted to the sugary bait, make a new batch using cat or dog food. If you have carpenter ants, use wet,rotting wood. Experiment with the boric acid levels until you get the dose right.
  6. Oh, and if the ants aren't doing any damage, consider just leaving them alone. Ants in the house can be VERY beneficial, preying on flea larvae, silverfish and clothes moths.  Outdoors, they fight a much more important foe—termites, their natural enemies. A yard full of anthills is a very effective barrier to termite invasion. (Talk about 'turf wars'!)

 

Interesting stuff, especially the termite part. My yard is littered with ant hills. I got tired of trying to kill them all. They seem to stay outside for the most part. occassionally, I'll find a couple in the house but that's rare. 

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Good luck outside Spark, I've never had much success getting rid of them, but FWIW when they get in I put these Terro liquid traps out and I can tell they ******* work.

 

The little bastards just disappear.

 

 

 

terro ant trap.500.jpeg

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