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Effect of thunder storms

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With the threat of thunder storms over the next few days - does this impact fishing for you?  Is it better just before - does it light up right after?   Obviously you don't want to be out during a storm - but what impact will the storm have just before or after on the fishing?  Maybe it doesn't have any impact at all - it's just I remember several years ago getting into my first blitz - only to be pushed off the water by an incoming thunder storm.  Perhaps it was just co-incidence.

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No impact on fishing whatsoever, but a big impact on me. I won't fish if there's even a hint of a thunderstorm coming. But rain and wind...no problem.

-bd

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You could argue that the change of Barometric pressure affects the fish either negatively/positively, I know i've heard that a high pressure system seems to have a negative affect on the fishing. I was out a few days ago watching storms across the bay a good 10+ miles away and didn't get a bump. Causation i'm not sure, coincidence maybe, third options being I just can't catch fish. Ha!

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I know you are just asking and I'm sure there is likely some healthy supporting logic out there that would dictate one variable to be better than it's direct contrast, however I think that you can drive yourself crazy trying to figure out prime time. To be sure, I suggest fishing before AND after a storm. Do this 10x and then compare your results along with lunar calendar, tidal data, wind direction / speed, water temps, water clarity and salinity, outdoor temperature and cloud cover, time of year, area bait/forage observations, current boating/fishing pressure, and of course time of day. 

Not trying to be snarky but really, fish both sides or whenever you can. Tide and wind direction would mean more to me. I know I have asked this same question long ago and over the years recollect varying results fishing on both sides of a storm. Theory I have always heard was fishing is always better before a storm and a storm will shut down fish in a post frontal scenario. Thinking back? not always and have even noted some killer trips just after a storm.  However, might just be me and one or more of those other variables I mention was the real or combining factors that affected the results. 

Good luck!

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I think there is a HUGE difference between passing thunderstorms and a true "Low" pressure system/storm.  A good Nor'easter you will want to fish before and up to start of the storm (until it gets unfishable), plus after the water tends to be like chocolate milk for a few days.  How much swell does the storm produce is also a large factor.  Thunderstorms i dont want to venture to far from the car, 10' rod in lightening is a bad combo.

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I'm usually gone with the first rumbles, but one evening at my camp the largemouth were just destroying gurglers - big fish on every cast. I couldn't leave, and I saw those nasty clouds coming down the mountains at the north end of the pond and saw the lightening bolts across the pond, and I knew I had to go in but I could not pry myself off the dock. Finally it just got too damned insane so I went in, but those fish kept it up as I watched from the screen porch. Not sure stripers would behave the same but if there was a mad blitz I could see being tempted to tempt fate again. Getting older not smarter I guess...

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OK, true recent story and another SOL member was with me that day to back me up. We planned to get out for an all-righter but the threat of thunderstorms was on the horizon. I eventually made the call of it being just an early AM start to avoid them.  That said it rained quite hard with heavy t-storms all night and made it hard for a motivated early start but got to the ramp at maybe 5:30am. And what we found was a typically a busy boat ramp that was completely empty at 5:30-6AM on a weekend day? Launched and still had nobody behind me. Incoming tide and the water was mixed but mostly stained. After shopping around we found chocolate milk colored water and noticed the temps were all over the place. I think between 62-63 is ideal so targeted to fish in that and was quickly rewarded. Also fishing in the shallows the darker water is helpful for not spooking as many fish. We hit it pretty good with steady fish for hours. And we had the spot / area all to ourselves without another boat in sight. 

Can't promise this as a pattern but would not avoid going out after a storm if that is the only time I had to fish and besides... I don't like counting on the weatherman for the pending start of a storm either. Have had too many times being offshore looking in and hoping the system is moving any direction except east. Even worst being out at night in a kayak and a distance from the launch spot. 

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55 minutes ago, stormy monday said:

I'm usually gone with the first rumbles, but one evening at my camp the largemouth were just destroying gurglers - big fish on every cast. I couldn't leave, and I saw those nasty clouds coming down the mountains at the north end of the pond and saw the lightening bolts across the pond, and I knew I had to go in but I could not pry myself off the dock. Finally it just got too damned insane so I went in, but those fish kept it up as I watched from the screen porch. Not sure stripers would behave the same but if there was a mad blitz I could see being tempted to tempt fate again. Getting older not smarter I guess...

I have also experienced this and recall a time when I was younger with my first 12' tin boat. It was raining so hard (t-storms) that I did not realize I was starting to sink. Saw the fuel tank start to float and realized how in trouble I was going to be if I did not stop and leave. Caught 27 nice large-mouth in like 20 minutes. Will never forget it as I fished for hours w/o a bite that day and with the rumble of the thunder and rain it was like a light switch went off. And today I have bigger faster boats and off the water if it is even in the forecast. Sometimes it is nicer not knowing. :-| 

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I've done well Striper fishing, right before getting caught in a lightning storm, not something I want to go through again.

When I see this... I get out of Dodge as fast as possible.... sooner is even better

lightning_strike_lake_athens.jpg

Otherwise, you may end up like this, and he's damn lucky.

lightning-destroyed-fishing-rod.jpg


 

lightning-burnt-fisherman.jpg

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Yes fishing always seems to pick up right before one is forced to run for it, and then it's good afterwards too, especially if the wind stays up and it's still dark. I used to hang around counting the lightning off. However, one time I was standing in a river and was counting the lightning at over 10 miles away, slight flashes and distant rumbles, and then a huge bolt hit about a hundred yards off downriver. I was practically deaf. Everyone fishing the pool went scurrying for their cars. The moral is that it's stupid to sit there trying to fish until the last second. They say that if you can hear thunder you are within striking distance--I don't quite believe that but it's worth noting.

Edited by Sngl2th

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A note of "thanks" to al for the advice. I am recently retired and hadn't fished for some 20 years due to owning a business but now I'm getting back into it and the info you provided here could be life saving, I'll take heed and hopefully live a bit longer.

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Those picks of that guy getting hit - oh man, that must have sucked but he sure is lucky to be alive. 

Have never been hit on the water but have witnessed some strikes that have imploded massive pine trees like a bomb was set off from within. 

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15 hours ago, StriperSurg said:

I've done well Striper fishing, right before getting caught in a lightning storm, not something I want to go through again.

When I see this... I get out of Dodge as fast as possible.... sooner is even better

lightning_strike_lake_athens.jpg

Otherwise, you may end up like this, and he's damn lucky.

DPoElb3.jpg

 

eiOqh2A.jpg


 

If that isn't enough to dissuade someone from "pushing the envelope," nothing is. :shock:

-bd

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I've done very well fishing just before and just after a line of strong storms goes through, really seems to turn on the fish, especially big ones.  Key is to pick a spot where you are close to cover and don't stay out there too long!

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