jjdbike

Braid wrapping tip of noodle?

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Hello folks,

wrapped up west coast surf fishing trip. I used 2 9' Shimano Claris Salmon / Steelhead rods, MH & M. The MH for throwing Kastmasters & Luckey Craft hard swim baits. The M was for Carolina rigging mole crabs. While they cast well and the action was appropriate, the braided running line would often wrap around the tip.

I'm assuming it's somewhere between, or a combination of quirk of rod and conditions, & user error. Either way it was a bit of a pain. 

Any one here know why this is happening and or how I can prevent it?

I'd like to use them in the NJ surf for fluke, king fish, shad, potentially even false albies. They're great for tossing light weight a distance while protecting lighter leaders.

Thanks!

JD

Edited by jjdbike
Type o & added content

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what braid were you using?

That's the number one reason i hate super limp braids.

Part of the reason why i like fins 40g so much besides how far it casts.

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Suffix 832 10 & 15lb.

I really like that line, knots and casts fairly well in my opinion. First I've had this experience w/ it & only w/ these long and light Shimano Claris steelhead rods. Like I said, I'm guessing it's some combination of quirks w/ rod, conditions and my technique. Never considered the line. They're all freshly spooled a little over a week ago. I'd hate to have to re-respool.

Do you think the line is 100% to blame? Is there something I can do to elevate or at least make it less frequent?

Thanks!

JD

Edited by jjdbike

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I remember having the same problem last year with my st Croix 9'6" ml avid spinning rod using it for albies. After each cast I had to check to make sure it wasn't wrapped around the tip, but I was using 17lb test mono with no hardware, tying direct and thought the lure was making a twist in the line forcing it to loop over the tip. The rod has a light tip since it is only rated to 5/8.

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I use both of those rods here on the wrong coast but mine are the longer 10 ft.   Don't really have that problem.  I am using regular 20 pd PP.   I throw everything from lucky craft 110s, 1.5 ounce tins and 1.5 inch perch grubs-Carolina rigged with one ounce egg weights.

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Not familiar with the specific rods mentioned above, but can lend some insight, as I have fished a long out-of-production Lamiglass S-glass salmon rod (9ft) in the surf for at least 25 yrs. 

Salmon spinners have an action not unlike a fly rod, in that a hard "speed up and stop" casting stroke will cause the rod tip to flex forward of the rod centerline at the end of the cast.  With a fly rod, this will, at a certain amplitude, desirably open the loop just enough to prevent the fly from grabbing the fly line (underneath it) as the loop unrolls.  If one casts a softer fly rod as hard as one is used to casting a stiffer rod, the fly line will develop waves - the result of the rod tip oscillating and inducing several waves into the line as the loop unrolls.

Now consider the case of a soft spinning (or conventional) blank cast with a "punch" by the right hand (if right handed) at the end of the cast - the longer (compared to a stiffer "fast" action rod) flex section will overshoot the centerline of the blank, and oscillate until it expends the energy that was "residual" after release of the lure.  If one is using a very limp line, and the wind is not at the back of the caster, a scenario where the undulations of the line can result in a looping around the tip is conceivable.

On my old Lami, I use 30 lb pp, and my rod is wrapped in the original NGC layout with Fuji Alconite 8mm running guides.  My original wrap was COF, and I had not yet learned to pull with the left hand and only guide with the right.  I addition, I learned to stop the rod tip in a 45 degree to the horizon angle.  These changes (stiffer braid brand, lower guide mass on the rod flex section, lower to no end of cast pulse impartation (by the right hand) and a higher end of cast tip elevation) have greatly reduced, but not completely eliminated post cast completion tip wrap.

Lastly, I have overall developed the habit, with all casting (spin, conventional and fly) of giving a little tug on the line, once the reel is in the battery position, prior to starting the cast. With practice and tackle familiarity, you will be able to feel an unnatural resistance in the line, thus greatly reducing the occurrence of crack offs, or worse yet tip breakage.

Hope this helps.

 

Edited by FlatWing

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Yes,

makes sense, & good information.

my other surf rods I've been using are very fast action which requires a different,  faster, more punchy energy at end of cast. I'll need to slow down and even out the energy of the cast. I realize these rods were more designed to protect light line than to cast beyond the bar. Still, I'm thinking they could make good light surf rods for fluke etc...

l'll experiment w/ adjusting my casting w/ them.

thanks!

JD

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Fireline Crystal 8 lbs or Nanofil 10-12 lbs will solve your tip wrap problem.... until it's really worn in and get limp. Which should be at least a year to two years depending how often you cast and retrieve.

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