ThunnusBlue

How do squid mark on a fish finder

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Got into some squid the other day offshore. They weren't marking on the fishfinder but we were catching them. Does anyone know how a school of squid shows up on a fish finder. Does it need to be set at a certain frequency? I believe they were loligo squid.

Anyone know a good technique for catching them in deep water? Thanks.

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Each machine reacts differently. Newer electronics are more sensitive with Squid showing as a cloud. Squid specific Jiggs actually work 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

We weren't marking anything. The machine we were using is a higher end Garmin with a powerful transducer. I know the machine works because we've been using it for years. Marks ground fish, bass, blues, dogfish, mackerel, herring, tuna, etc. Shows nothing when the squid are around. 

I know for a fact there were a lot of squid around because they kept kill our baits. Sometimes a school would follow up the live bait when we were checking baits. On occasion I was able to jig some up but only managed a few for the day.

I have a lot of experience jigging squid on piers but I've never targeted them offshore before. I typically use small Yami****a and mid-sized Yozuri squid jigs rigging in tandem. 

Yesterday, I only had a sabiki style squid rig. A line of squid hooks rigged with glow beads. Wasn't very productive. 

Edited by ThunnusBlue

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1 hour ago, pat the nat said:

I may be completely wrong on this but fishfinders 'find' fish by having the signal bounce off the air bladder.  Squid don't have one so no return???

 

  this is correct. they would show up if they were super dense i suppose but non air bladder fish don't show unless a solid mass. 

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That makes sense. Thanks for the info.

Anyone know a good technique for catching them offshore? Is the best technique to lure them in with a giant light at night? Any tips for catching them during the day?

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Seafans and soft coral don't have air bladders but they show up on sounders. Squid will definitely show, but don't expect to tell that they're squid, it'll look like any baitshow you'll usually see.

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  i have fished squid commercially and for bait but not in your area so the following may not apply.  vessel drifting. fish windward side. bright light shining down into the water. usually better to jig outside the light. the border of light and dark usually the best. one or 2 squid jigs on a line. try both until you see what is working best.  squid light on the bottom of your rig is sometimes the way to go and sometimes not the way to go. if the bite is poor cut a squid leg off and hook to the jig. sometimes this is the only way to get a decent bite (squid are cannibalistic). try to imitate an injured squid in your jigging technique. stop and go, periods of rest etc. subtle twitches usually the best.  squid will not be present when the moon is up (i think i remember reading this is not true in your area ?). darker the night the better. try different depths. start shallow and work your way down. sometimes way down. sometimes they will follow the caught squid to the surface and stay at shallower depths for awhile. when this happens fish hard and fast to keep them up.if marine mammals show up you are screwed, leave....again, this is the way i have fished squid in the pacific from el salvador to the galapagos , may not apply in your waters....good luck

 

 just remembered i fished squid off africa as well and the above applied there also

Edited by mark d

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1 hour ago, mark d said:

 

  i have fished squid commercially and for bait but not in your area so the following may not apply.  vessel drifting. fish windward side. bright light shining down into the water. usually better to jig outside the light. the border of light and dark usually the best. one or 2 squid jigs on a line. try both until you see what is working best.  squid light on the bottom of your rig is sometimes the way to go and sometimes not the way to go. if the bite is poor cut a squid leg off and hook to the jig. sometimes this is the only way to get a decent bite (squid are cannibalistic). try to imitate an injured squid in your jigging technique. stop and go, periods of rest etc. subtle twitches usually the best.  squid will not be present when the moon is up (i think i remember reading this is not true in your area ?). darker the night the better. try different depths. start shallow and work your way down. sometimes way down. sometimes they will follow the caught squid to the surface and stay at shallower depths for awhile. when this happens fish hard and fast to keep them up.if marine mammals show up you are screwed, leave....again, this is the way i have fished squid in the pacific from el salvador to the galapagos , may not apply in your waters....good luck

 

 just remembered i fished squid off africa as well and the above applied there also

Thank you for the detailed answer. 

Squid are definitely cannibals. Mackerel and codfish are too. I was once trolling a tinker mackerel and reeled in a 15" mac. The other day, the schools of squid ate the face off our live squid...... They were eating the organs out of the mackerel. The same spot every time. It seems like they know where the vulnerable soft spots are and start there first.  

The squid I caught the other day were right on the bottom. I know they were higher in the water column though because they were eating our baits mid-water. 

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Use a split screen, with bottom zoom on one side.

As someone said earlier, different machines show squid differently.

My older Furuno color machine shows them as light blue scratches on or very close to the bottom; when the squid are really dense, there will be some patches of warmer colors as well.

My Simrad with chirp tends to show them as clouds of small marks close to the bottom.

Actually find the Furuno more reliable as far as identifying squid go, which is one reason I like to use two machines--each has something that it does better.

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2 hours ago, CWitek said:

Use a split screen, with bottom zoom on one side.

As someone said earlier, different machines show squid differently.

My older Furuno color machine shows them as light blue scratches on or very close to the bottom; when the squid are really dense, there will be some patches of warmer colors as well.

My Simrad with chirp tends to show them as clouds of small marks close to the bottom.

Actually find the Furuno more reliable as far as identifying squid go, which is one reason I like to use two machines--each has something that it does better.

Bottom zoom is a good call. I'll try that on our next trip. 

Do the squid typically hang near the bottom during the day? The ones I caught were all on the bottom but our baits were murdered at mid-water.

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I've seen squid schools show up as a cloud as noted above...more specifically, they almost look like a ghosted school of bait. But unless you are on a substantial school, they could be cruising just above the bottom and hard to read. The times I've seen the clouds/ghosted images they were thick...like 10-50ft high schools. They didn't look like any kind of baitfish schools I'd ever seen before, no solid return, just a ghosted image of a school of bait.

You can have squid mauling your bait and never see one on the machine.

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