JCoutu55

High Production Processes

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Hey guys, got a quick question. When producing a high quantity of plugs what do you think the bigger plug company's do for their final step. I know 2 part epoxy is what most use and so do I. But if one was to make 500 lures I gotta think they do something a little faster then hand paint 2 part epoxy on each one. Do they spray it? And if so how? Do the just use a durable clear coat to spray it easier? I make them now with a 2 part I brush on and they come out great but I look at some other plugs in the stores that are perfectly coated and I feel like they spray it on? Am I way off? If not how do they do it and with what? Just some thoughts would be great! Searched the forums, don't crucify me lol

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from what i have seen in videos some use a automotive type clear sprayed on. They did batches on frame then transferred the frame to a large drying rack.

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Most large production shops spray a protective coating, usually tow part.  The important part is that the protective coating sticks to the paint extremely well.  Be extremely careful if you are spaying as the epoxy and protective coatings are usually toxic and require proper airflow and ventilation.

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They either spray or dip. Either way, probably with stuff that is cost prohibitive and/or unsafe for small time builders. 

We have discussed this before, but it bares repeating. While most folks focus on the clear coat, it is much more than that.  It's the whole finishing process from sealer,  primer,  paint and clear coat. They all have to work together. If your primer does not stick to your sealer, doesn't matter how good your clear coat is, it's all peeling off anyway. 

Finally, it makes no difference what final coat you use, they all suck balls. 

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20 hours ago, Jig Man said:

 

Finally, it makes no difference what final coat you use, they all suck balls. 

Any search for the term "clear coat" should link to this quote, by default.

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On 7/27/2017 at 7:34 PM, Jig Man said:

They either spray or dip. Either way, probably with stuff that is cost prohibitive and/or unsafe for small time builders. 

We have discussed this before, but it bares repeating. While most folks focus on the clear coat, it is much more than that.  It's the whole finishing process from sealer,  primer,  paint and clear coat. They all have to work together. If your primer does not stick to your sealer, doesn't matter how good your clear coat is, it's all peeling off anyway. 

Finally, it makes no difference what final coat you use, they all suck balls. 

guess you never seen a beach master 

 

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8 hours ago, extreme fisherman said:
   On July 27, 2017 at 7:34 PM,  Jig Man said: 

 

Finally, it makes no difference what final coat you use, they all suck balls. 

 

My point 

Guess my comment was not clear, so let me clarify. My comment had nothing to do with durability of the clear coat. There are plenty of clear coats in use that do this well. My comment had more to do with the pains that occur when applying the clear coat or the idiosyncrasies associated with each. Some have to be applied within certain temperate or humidity ranges. Some can be flipped, others have to spin. Some spin for short times, other longer times. Some you need a foam brush, others are fine with a regular brush. Different clear coats play well with certain paints and suck with others. The builder has to do enough testing to figure all this out. Add to that: changes in paint/primer/clear formulae; local shops stop carrying your favorite clear; the manufacture stops making it; you get a bad batch and it ruins a bunch of plugs; etc, meaning that you are now back to square one figuring your system out again. Not to mention stuff like: coming back the day after clear coating and finding insects imbedded in the epoxy; you drop a freshly coated plug into a pile of sawdust; your spinner stops turning part way through so the epoxy is now sagging to one side; you didn’t measure right or mix thoroughly so the epoxy never sets up; and other fun and games. Like I said above, it’s a total system: sealer; primer; paint; and clear coat. There are plenty of different systems that can do the job well. The builder just has to take the time to figure out what works best for how/where they build and realize there are things beyond their control (e.g., getting a bad batch, no longer sold) that can come into play at some point. Hope that clarifies what I meant.

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21 hours ago, Jig Man said:

Guess my comment was not clear, so let me clarify. My comment had nothing to do with durability of the clear coat. There are plenty of clear coats in use that do this well. My comment had more to do with the pains that occur when applying the clear coat or the idiosyncrasies associated with each. Some have to be applied within certain temperate or humidity ranges. Some can be flipped, others have to spin. Some spin for short times, other longer times. Some you need a foam brush, others are fine with a regular brush. Different clear coats play well with certain paints and suck with others. The builder has to do enough testing to figure all this out. Add to that: changes in paint/primer/clear formulae; local shops stop carrying your favorite clear; the manufacture stops making it; you get a bad batch and it ruins a bunch of plugs; etc, meaning that you are now back to square one figuring your system out again. Not to mention stuff like: coming back the day after clear coating and finding insects imbedded in the epoxy; you drop a freshly coated plug into a pile of sawdust; your spinner stops turning part way through so the epoxy is now sagging to one side; you didn’t measure right or mix thoroughly so the epoxy never sets up; and other fun and games. Like I said above, it’s a total system: sealer; primer; paint; and clear coat. There are plenty of different systems that can do the job well. The builder just has to take the time to figure out what works best for how/where they build and realize there are things beyond their control (e.g., getting a bad batch, no longer sold) that can come into play at some point. Hope that clarifies what I meant.

All of these have happened to me! Haha, I just chalked it up to being a part of the learning process. I haven't dropped a freshly coated plug in sawdust yet though........YET!

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On ‎7‎/‎30‎/‎2017 at 10:19 AM, Jig Man said:

. Like I said above, it’s a total system: sealer; primer; paint; and clear coat. There are plenty of different systems that can do the job well. The builder just has to take the time to figure out what works best for how/where they build

x2

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On July 30, 2017 at 10:19 AM, Jig Man said:

Guess my comment was not clear, so let me clarify. My comment had nothing to do with durability of the clear coat. There are plenty of clear coats in use that do this well. My comment had more to do with the pains that occur when applying the clear coat or the idiosyncrasies associated with each. Some have to be applied within certain temperate or humidity ranges. Some can be flipped, others have to spin. Some spin for short times, other longer times. Some you need a foam brush, others are fine with a regular brush. Different clear coats play well with certain paints and suck with others. The builder has to do enough testing to figure all this out. Add to that: changes in paint/primer/clear formulae; local shops stop carrying your favorite clear; the manufacture stops making it; you get a bad batch and it ruins a bunch of plugs; etc, meaning that you are now back to square one figuring your system out again. Not to mention stuff like: coming back the day after clear coating and finding insects imbedded in the epoxy; you drop a freshly coated plug into a pile of sawdust; your spinner stops turning part way through so the epoxy is now sagging to one side; you didn’t measure right or mix thoroughly so the epoxy never sets up; and other fun and games. Like I said above, it’s a total system: sealer; primer; paint; and clear coat. There are plenty of different systems that can do the job well. The builder just has to take the time to figure out what works best for how/where they build and realize there are things beyond their control (e.g., getting a bad batch, no longer sold) that can come into play at some point. Hope that clarifies what I meant.

I fully understand all this went through it all , several years of trying different setups before I found a system that works for me .. Builders have to just keep at it until they get the results they want .. Stepping up to high production will change all that and things will need to be tweaked. When I first started my clear coat and paint would come off fairly easily due to the primer I was using . Another problem I ran into was sealer bleeding under my clear coat and lifting the paint and finish , once I found the method of dealing I use problem solved..

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On July 27, 2017 at 6:53 AM, JCoutu55 said:

Hey guys, got a quick question. When producing a high quantity of plugs what do you think the bigger plug company's do for their final step. I know 2 part epoxy is what most use and so do I. But if one was to make 500 lures I gotta think they do something a little faster then hand paint 2 part epoxy on each one. Do they spray it? And if so how? Do the just use a durable clear coat to spray it easier? I make them now with a 2 part I brush on and they come out great but I look at some other plugs in the stores that are perfectly coated and I feel like they spray it on? Am I way off? If not how do they do it and with what? Just some thoughts would be great! Searched the forums, don't crucify me lol

Most plug builders who do high production still use 2 part epoxy , while its not the easiest way it is the safest. The fastest way would be an auto/ marine spray finish that is very toxic and a professional spray booth and equipment is needed . 

Edited by extreme fisherman

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Just a quick side note. I am a cabinetmaker that has access to spray equipment and crazy topcoats. I tried using a two part conversion varnish on some plugs. Went on great but it destroyed the airbrush paint underneath. 

I spray the primer coats on my plugs Then airbrush the colors. For the top coat I actually dip them into an industrial water based production lacquer. Spraying just took to Long to build a thick enough finish.

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Just a quick side note. I am a cabinetmaker that has access to spray equipment and crazy topcoats. I tried using a two part conversion varnish on some plugs. Went on great but it detroyed the airbrush paint underneath.

I spray the primer coats on my plugs Then airbrush the colors. For the topThen I actually dip them into 

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