MG24

Thoughts on used fly rod

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I just came across a guy on Facebook selling a St. Croix Avid 9' 9WT, paired with a Teton 9-11 reel. He is asking $300. What do you guys think about this setup and price for a beginner to fly fishing?

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Posted (edited) · Report post

It depends on what you mean by "beginner".

I will leave it to others to comment on the "buy" or not.  But, when I was 14 and had never touched a fly rod but really, really wanted to learn, I bought, mail order, a 10 wt so I could fish for salmon and steelhead.   (The rod, automatic reel, line, leaders, flies, and instruction book cost me $19.95......yea......it was THAT long ago.)  BIG MISTAKE!!  The rod was heavy and unforgiving for the repetitive, inefficient wrist, elbow, and shoulder punishment that was to come in learning the most basic stuff of fly casting.  Big dreams......little logic.  It was 3-4 years before I could realistically handle a rod that heavy.

Yes, the rod these days will be good, and lighter.  And you are probably  more muscular adult and can absorb MORE punishment, but if you are not past the basic stage of learning the casting stroke I would recommend LEARNING on something much lighter, like a 4 or 5 weight.  The casting stroke is exactly the same, and you will be able to practice, cast, and fish MUCH longer before your arm gives out and lapses into poor technique.

Just my opinion.  If you are further along and a "beginner" at big rod, SW fishing, completely different situation.

Edited by Peter Patricelli

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MG 24  Are there any Gander Mountain Stores in Maine>  They have Redington starter Combos for sail up to 8wt

Rod, Reel, backing and line at $190.00 with a 30% to 40% price cut,  They are going out of business. Fly lines for $30.00 etc,  Not a lot left, the announced the O O B on May 10, 2017

Most large fly fishing companies have combos.  Most Outdoor Stores, Cabela's and Bass Pro, Orvis and LL Bean.

They also have excellent sales on fly rods.  

 

The Teton 9 to 11 wt reel must be a typo.  My Tetons have only one number on top of the foot  8 10 etc

They are great reels but heavy compared to what you can buy for much less.

 

LL Bean has a great replacement Policy. They do move some rods and reels thru their bargain store in Maine

 

When you get more than 15 post on SOL you will be elegible for PM's (Private Messages) from any SOL'er.

Welcome Aboard!   You will be happy here.  RJ

There is also a buy ad Sell forum for rods, reels etc here o SOL.

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Agree with the above, used is good if you know what you are getting, but for $300 you can get a very capable new rod and a quality reel. Plus a lot of the older rods are two piece rather than four, which can be inconvenient depending on your transportation situation. 

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Thanks Peter, that is great advice. I had been wondering about learning on smaller gear first.

I would definitely consider myself a true beginner to fly fishing in general. I have only handled a fly rod as far as messing around casting with a friends freshwater setup. 

RJ, unfortunately no Gander Mountain up here. I am taking some casting lessons at LL Bean next month and they will most likely be my first choice if I choose buy a new setup over a used one.

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Not sure where you are in Maine but they had some pretty nice deals last time I was in the Orvis shop in Freeport. Don't overlook Cabelas in Scarborough either they have some pretty nice outfit deals as well and you never know what's in the closeout room. I started my son on a 5 weight in fresh, but quickly moved him to a 7 for largemouths and now am taking him to an 8 for salt. Every rod is different but I find a lot of difference between my 8 and my 9. So those answers apply to the more corporate type shops, check out some local shops too like Eldridge in Cape Neddick, it's good to support your local shop and always good to build a relationship...

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MG

No wish to pee Peter off but I come at the learning side from the other end of the rod weight spectrum.

I mostly only fish in salt water. 9 and 10 wts and so when I get to help out totally raw begginers to cast its all I have. What helps is that the new Guy mostly does not have a clue as to the differences between say a 6 and a 10 wt. It is just a rod to them. The bigger rod casting a heavier line for some is easier to,feel. I think it helps show up bad casting faults easier to like lose wrists or trying to cast from the wrist. Lighter power rods are much easier to dominate and less likely to show up some basic faults to the actual Caster not to just the person trying to teach them.

To calibrate I think it's  true to say that most guys on here will disagree with me and suggest the lighter rod route.

Mike

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Posted (edited) · Report post

4 hours ago, RJ said:

MG 24  Are there any Gander Mountain Stores in Maine>  They have Redington starter Combos for sail up to 8wt

Rod, Reel, backing and line at $190.00 with a 30% to 40% price cut,  They are going out of business. Fly lines for $30.00 etc,  Not a lot left, the announced the O O B on May 10, 2017

Most large fly fishing companies have combos.  Most Outdoor Stores, Cabela's and Bass Pro, Orvis and LL Bean.

They also have excellent sales on fly rods.  

 

The Teton 9 to 11 wt reel must be a typo.  My Tetons have only one number on top of the foot  8 10 etc

They are great reels but heavy compared to what you can buy for much less.

 

LL Bean has a great replacement Policy. They do move some rods and reels thru their bargain store in Maine

 

When you get more than 15 post on SOL you will be elegible for PM's (Private Messages) from any SOL'er.

Welcome Aboard!   You will be happy here.  RJ

There is also a buy ad Sell forum for rods, reels etc here o SOL.

RJ sorry, who's "going out of biz"..Gander or Reddington? Just googled, goodby GM. Sorry

Edited by brushfly

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I suggest you go to Bean's or some other store where you can try casting a few lower end rods. They may also have some returns available at a low price.  For beginner's, a slower action is generally easier to learn on, as they are more forgiving on less than perfect timing.  Try before you buy!

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Depends on where your primarily going to be fishing in regards to what weight rod to start with. If your poking around freshwater 5wt is perfect, salt water I'd grab an 8wt. Learning to fish your primary environment is the quickest way to learn.

 

For example. If your fishing mostly saltwater for striped bass and learn on a 5wt in the park, then decide your ready to fish; your going to want at least an 8wt. So that not only means buying another rod, but relearning the dynamics of casting for that particular weight class. It's not necessarily once you can cast one rod you can cast them all, especially not in the beginning. It becomes an unnecessary multi step process. 

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22 hours ago, Mike Oliver said:

MG

No wish to pee Peter off but I come at the learning side from the other end of the rod weight spectrum.

I mostly only fish in salt water. 9 and 10 wts and so when I get to help out totally raw begginers to cast its all I have. What helps is that the new Guy mostly does not have a clue as to the differences between say a 6 and a 10 wt. It is just a rod to them. The bigger rod casting a heavier line for some is easier to,feel. I think it helps show up bad casting faults easier to like lose wrists or trying to cast from the wrist. Lighter power rods are much easier to dominate and less likely to show up some basic faults to the actual Caster not to just the person trying to teach them.

To calibrate I think it's  true to say that most guys on here will disagree with me and suggest the lighter rod route.

Mike

I'm going w/ Mike on this,much easier to feel the dynamics of casting on an 8 or 9.

I recently roped in a friend to the world of FF and he started on a 6wt,slow but sure progress.He bought an 8wt bcz,1 month into his new endeavor,his GF's family invited him to a week in Beaufort.When he came back from a week of fishing the 8 and went back to his 6 he was killing it,tight loops,driving cast,good haul timing.His opinion,too, was the 8 was easier to feel the cast than the lighter rod.

A heavier rod is less forgiving of mistakes and bad casting than a light rod.Light rods too easily allow bad form from which bad habits follow.

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Thanks for all the good advice guys. I am taking casting lessons next week, I assume they will be using lighter gear, but I think I am going to go with an 8 or 9 when I buy my own since I will be fishing salt. I like the idea of practicing with the gear I will actually be fishing with.

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MG24

Over here in the UK you get taught with a 6 wt. I sometimes think that some of the Teachers never go salt water fishing. You could ask your teacher if he/she has a 9 wt rod you can have a lesson with. Better still find a teacher who is also a salt water Fisher.

As to your stir  the pot question there is no absolute best answer and budget has an impact.

Any decent 9 or 10 wt rod in a fast action with. A 10 wt shading it by a long way for me. Any reel that will hold the fly line and 100 yards of backing. Three fly lines. A floater an Intermediate and a very fast sink. All wf lines not shooting heads. Line tray,wading  gear of your choice.

Get some flies and get fishing.

It really need not be a big deal assembling your kit.

Mike

 

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Best single hand Sgriper setup I have is Orvis Recon 7'11'' #10 rod, Airflo C.A.S.T. WF9F line and Danielsson F3W 7ten reel. The 450gr long belly line performs great and when rod is short and very light and reel is very light too it is easy to cast fast and narrow line loops.

Esa

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