jpiercy13

Getting mud off clam shell

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Pressure washer works but I usually just scrub the ones that are being steamed. I should go to your house to use your pressure washer Phil.

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Years ago I did a lot of catering, in addition to my regular hosting of dinner/cookout parties at my house.

I'd buy oysters by the 100-count from a local provider.  Until I'd scrubbed a 100 or 200 by hand, I had no idea how sore my back could get while leaning over a sink!

I initially built a hinged rack out of scrap 1 x 3s for the frame, to which I attached 1/2" mesh.  If IIRC, it was about 40" x 20", purely as a function of the lumber I had on hand at the time.

Open it up, lay the oysters down, close it (I just used some copper wire), then stand it up against one of the outside work tables and use the pressure washer to clean those bad boys up.  spray one side, flip the rack and spray the other side.  Simple.

This became known among my friends as "TOS" (Texas Oyster Scubber).

After using TOS for a while, I removed the hinges in order to be able to accommodate various sizes of oysters by having three different depths between the screens:  screens furthest apart, screens closest together, and a halfway arrangement.

 

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1 minute ago, mybosox3 said:

Pressure washer works but I usually just scrub the ones that are being steamed. I should go to your house to use your pressure washer Phil.

I scrub manually as well, Jim, when I only have a few dozen to do.  When it gets to 100 or more (see my most recent post here), I go with TOS!

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1 minute ago, mybosox3 said:

Great idea! A peck can be anywhere up to 120 or so and it is backbreaking scrubbing them

Never bothered me when I was in my much-younger days.  By the time I hit my mid-40s, I'd decided that it wasn't much fun!

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54 minutes ago, Southcoastphil said:

Never bothered me when I was in my much-younger days.  By the time I hit my mid-40s, I'd decided that it wasn't much fun!

 

54 minutes ago, Southcoastphil said:

Never bothered me when I was in my much-younger days.  By the time I hit my mid-40s, I'd decided that it wasn't much fun!

In my late 60's it's painful 

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Just now, Southcoastphil said:

If its any solace, Jim, it is painful in my early 60s!

No solace but sometimes the collecting and walk back to the truck is worse. So I share your pain.

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Those magic erasers work pretty well.  Can remove a lot more dirt with less effort. But if you're doing a hundred clams it's still going to make your back ache.  You're better off putting the hose on them  and using water pressure.

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2 hours ago, big popper said:

i went through 500 little necks over july 2 3 4th and i just ordered 200 for this weekend...i am giving the pressure washer a try great idea

  Nice what your favorite way to eat them ? 

 

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On 7/25/2017 at 0:36 PM, Southcoastphil said:

Years ago I did a lot of catering, in addition to my regular hosting of dinner/cookout parties at my house.

I'd buy oysters by the 100-count from a local provider.  Until I'd scrubbed a 100 or 200 by hand, I had no idea how sore my back could get while leaning over a sink!

I initially built a hinged rack out of scrap 1 x 3s for the frame, to which I attached 1/2" mesh.  If IIRC, it was about 40" x 20", purely as a function of the lumber I had on hand at the time.

Open it up, lay the oysters down, close it (I just used some copper wire), then stand it up against one of the outside work tables and use the pressure washer to clean those bad boys up.  spray one side, flip the rack and spray the other side.  Simple.

This became known among my friends as "TOS" (Texas Oyster Scubber).

After using TOS for a while, I removed the hinges in order to be able to accommodate various sizes of oysters by having three different depths between the screens:  screens furthest apart, screens closest together, and a halfway arrangement.

 

Love it!

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