buddha162

Sea Robin Catch and Cook

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18 posts in this topic

Very interesting, thanks for posting.

Cool how he just peels the meat off.

I'm going to try this recipe - heard from many knowledgeable folks that sea robin meat is quite sweet.

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Nice video again.   I'm guessing you are classically trained?    If I may be so bold as to give one bit of critique on the video; cut down on some of the mundane footage, ie, the chopping of the veg, etc.

Keep it up!

 

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Learned a lot...thanks.   Fillet 2 last week.  I will be processing them your way next,  Nice to know about the stock from them!  The Italians...they know stuff sometimes.

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10 hours ago, fishweewee said:

Very interesting, thanks for posting.

Cool how he just peels the meat off.

I'm going to try this recipe - heard from many knowledgeable folks that sea robin meat is quite sweet.

The tail is best cooked on the bone, if you're not making stock/soup that's what I would recommend. You can do a quick marinade (I've done some curry based marinades that work beautifully), and pan roast/chuck it on the grill. 

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10 hours ago, JaseB said:

Nice video again.   I'm guessing you are classically trained?    If I may be so bold as to give one bit of critique on the video; cut down on some of the mundane footage, ie, the chopping of the veg, etc.

Keep it up!

 

I suppose in the modern context I am classically trained...in a culinary school! Though of course you hone most of your techniques on the job. These days you would probably have to come up through the kitchens in France or big European cities to claim classical training in the traditional sense. 

I take your point re the mundane footage, but people seem to enjoy the slicing/dicing. Thanks for the feedback!

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Looks awesome.  I made soupe de poison using sea robin racks. It was delicious.  

Just curious, debut why do you use the tiny slicing knife for cutipting up the vegetables?  As a trained chef, I would have thought you would use a large chef's knife.

thanks for posting the video.

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thanks for posting this.  

Do you think blue crab would be a decent sub for the shrimp?  shells to build the broth add partially cooked lump back in to broth about the same time you put the shrimp in on simmer?

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18 hours ago, HKJonathan said:

Looks awesome.  I made soupe de poison using sea robin racks. It was delicious.  

Just curious, debut why do you use the tiny slicing knife for cutipting up the vegetables?  As a trained chef, I would have thought you would use a large chef's knife.

thanks for posting the video.

You know, I used a 10 and 12" chefs knife for years...now most of my prep is veg prep, and in relatively small quantities...I just find it easier and actually quicker to use a small, thin blade that runs through produce quickly. Using a back-slice on almost everything, instead of that classic rolling cut really preserves your knife's edge as well, esp if you use a soft cutting board. I'm too lazy to constantly be honing/stoning my knives lol. 

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