Trainman327

Snakeheads

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90 posts in this topic

1 hour ago, Pylodictis said:

Like I said, "Your points and arguments become weaker and weaker as you have brought complete discredit to your stance and view points the more you have talked. I got you where I wanted you and you wholeheartedly complied, that is good enough. ".

 

Tell me, what more is there to be said by me?

That psychological BS doesn't work on me.  I ignore personal attacks.  I ignore leading questions.

 

If you want to state facts, go ahead.  We are waiting.

 

Read post #69 for facts.  Those are the premise for my stance.

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9 minutes ago, reflection said:

That psychological BS doesn't work on me.  I ignore personal attacks.  I ignore leading questions.

 

If you want to state facts, go ahead.  We are waiting.

 

Read post #69 for facts.  Those are the premise for my stance.

 

There are no personal attacks, I am just stating fact. Big difference.

 

It is obvious that you intend to bring nothing to this site, forum, or thread other the argument for argument sake.

 

And you still are avoiding every question I have posed.

Edited by Pylodictis

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The facts that I listed are in post #69 for all to see.

 

You are entitled to your personal opinion (and so am I) but that doesn't change the facts.  So what are you arguing about?  Geeze

Edited by reflection

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After they stock the Alleghaney...could they stock some local NJ lakes.....I'd gladly replace largemouth with snakeheads!!!

Hell stock all the trophy trout lakes with em!!!!

 

That said...nobody knows accurately how they effect the ecosystems they've been introduced to.

 

Are they agressive...sure...Do they tear up fish tanks...absolutely.

 

Do they decimate bass populations....Not that I can tell.  But bass guys swear Muskies kill all their bass too!   TO the extent guys shoot em on some lakes at night.

 

I understand what both of you guys are saying.   

 

Both of your arguments seem specutlative.  BUt the fact is.  They are here...and they are not going anywhere anytime soon.   I hear they taste great....I've chosen to release those that I've caught...and plan to do so in the future.

 

How bout stock em in carp infested lakes.   See if they eat them!

 

Sucks that we got the brown snakeheads and not the Beautiful and huge black blue and white ones.

 

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3 minutes ago, reflection said:

The facts that I listed are in post #69 for all to see.

 

You are entitled to your personal opinion (and so am I) but that doesn't change the facts.  So what are you arguing about?  Geeze

I think the only facts are that they are non native....agressive....and like makin babies

 

Other than that....anyone can do whatever they want with them......catch & release or grill and release.

 

I have not heard of any negative impacts of them....

 

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51 minutes ago, scoobydoo said:

After they stock the Alleghaney...could they stock some local NJ lakes.....I'd gladly replace largemouth with snakeheads!!!

Hell stock all the trophy trout lakes with em!!!!

 

That said...nobody knows accurately how they effect the ecosystems they've been introduced to.

 

Are they agressive...sure...Do they tear up fish tanks...absolutely.

 

Do they decimate bass populations....Not that I can tell.  But bass guys swear Muskies kill all their bass too!   TO the extent guys shoot em on some lakes at night.

 

I understand what both of you guys are saying.   

 

Both of your arguments seem specutlative.  BUt the fact is.  They are here...and they are not going anywhere anytime soon.   I hear they taste great....I've chosen to release those that I've caught...and plan to do so in the future.

 

How bout stock em in carp infested lakes.   See if they eat them!

 

Sucks that we got the brown snakeheads and not the Beautiful and huge black blue and white ones.

 

Good point and you are correct in saying that even my stance is speculative, I like to speculate that most concerns are way over hyped especially in the case on the snake head. Subjectively and objectively, I just haven't seen anything to suggest that they currently or will eventually pose a significant threat to ecosystems that they have been introduced into. The peer reviewed articles I have read seem to suggest this, but the researchers do always add that (just like you said) the true impact they will have in the Chesapeake tidal waters is not fully understood at this point.  

 

I also just like to take the stance that the worst thing that could happen is that in 50 years our grand kids will be going to snake head tournaments just like people go to see walleye and bass tournaments now. They are definitely an incredible fish that deserves more then to be immediately put on the list for species deserving of persecution, but should be recognized as an incredible sporting opportunity just as peacock bass, lmb, musky, etc... have in locations where they have been introduced.

 

I think we, as humans, like to have different creatures that we like to apply a boogy man title too. The alligator gar suffered from this kind of label and was persecuted even though it was a native fish. Could you imagine being able to take a trip to the upper Ohio and try catching those massive fish on a fly rod if they had not been pushed to extinction due to the over hyping of the threat they posed to other game fish? 

 

Snake heads should be enjoyed.:)

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Heard from a friend there are now several varieties of snakeheads in the tribs off the Rapp.  One from South America.

Edited by JaseB

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On ‎9‎/‎6‎/‎2017 at 11:23 AM, JaseB said:

Heard from a friend there are now several varieties of snakeheads in the tribs off the Rapp.  One from South America.

 

That is odd as there are no snakeheads that are native to South America.

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I've got a question about what I think might have been a snakehead my son and I witnessed. It was across the street from our old house in Falls Church, Va where there is a county park with a walking trail near a creek. We made our way down to the creek one day. The water was about a foot deep, with rocks interspersed: typical creek. As soon as we got to the water edge, a "fish" I'm guessing a foot long rose up and tail-walked what I would estimate 40-50 yards in about 2 or 3 seconds. It was one of the strangest things either of us have ever seen. Really didn't get a good look at the fish because it happened so fast and was a little bit shocking. Does this sound like it could have been a snakehead? What else could it have been? It tail-walked across both the water and rocks ...

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Many good points made here. It’s not news that they are invasive, along with the majority of the other gamefish in the Chesapeake watershed. They’ve staked their claim, and they’re not going anywhere. Embrace them! They are a blast to fish for, they taste great, and our beloved LMB and many other game fish rely on the fry as forage. 

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On 3/17/2017 at 2:43 PM, Trainman327 said:

Has anyone caught Snakeheads in the upper bay, Susquehanna River or the flats. I have heard a few reports of them being caught off Elk Neck State Park, the North East Creek and by Port Deposit, but I don't trust the sources. I have also seen the USGS reports map, but that's not entirely accurate because not all fish caught are recorded. I'm interested in any first hand accounts.

Simple answer is yes they are being caught there as well now.

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On ‎2‎/‎2‎/‎2019 at 11:33 AM, dzlram said:

Simple answer is yes they are being caught there as well now.

Back when this was originally posted, I was just hearing stories on the periphery. Now I have seen it first hand. Caught my first Snakehead from the pier in Charlestown, Cecil county in early September 2018 on a 6" silver Rapala. It was only about 15" long, but was a snakehead none the less. I'm waiting to see them in the grass bed by the lighthouse in Havre de Grace, but none yet. I cast all around that area several times a week, in the evening, for most of the summer. Plenty of LMB and occasionally a Pickerel, but no Snakeheads yet. It's just a matter of time.

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It's possible they can be around the flats if plenty of freshwater is available. Considering their tolerance to saltwater being low, I doubt that they would consistently be at the flats. Your best bet is higher up into the flats closer to the dam. 

 

10 years ago I was catching them at the point of inception in Bowie Crofton right behind the post office. DNR would pay me by the lb to harvest for them. Parents told me that they eat snakeheads in Asia and they are delicious. So I started to give them out for ppl to eat. Sadly they posioned the pond. 

 

They are aggressive but I wouldn't say they are invasive as DNR states. Their adaptability makes them a threat to the ecosystem obviously. 

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I just found this article and would like to weight in.  I grew up in Vietnam where snakeheads are 'naturalized'.  They are aggressive and territorial, but if you give them sufficient body of water, they do not cause much problem to the other fish population.   The stories about snakeheads kill and eat other fish in tanks are because of their territorial nature and the tanks are not large enough space for them.  Snakeheads will fight and eat other snakeheads entering their territories, so in a way, their population are self-controlled. 

 

We have small lakes full of farmed tilapia and there's usually a couple of lurking snakeheads in it.  there are never too many snakeheads in any enclosed body of water because they are very territorial, even against their own kind.   They spawn a lot of fries, but fewer numbers survived to adult, just like many other species.  The farmed tilapia population do not get eaten to extinction.

 

Yes, snakeheads are delicious grilled, fried, baked, or braised.  It has been awhile since I eat snakeheads, but I think they taste/smell like halibuts but have some of the toughness of catfish.

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