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aae0130

Duralux

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Back when I was building (mostly poppers and gliders) I tried the easiest top coat for me. Polyacrylic.    That was garbage. It would disintergrate rapidly and what stayed on made my whites turn amber. 

 

I then started using Devcon 2 ton 30 minute. It worked but it was hard to apply evenly and I had to flip because I didn't have a turner or room to have one. Some would come out lumpy and others would get strands of acid brush and all sorts of stuff that I think was actually in the brushes. It also was unable to stand UV but held up longer then Polyacrylic.

 

One thing about the Polyacrylic that I liked is that it went on easily and always looked good when first done. It is definitely not water proof and can not handle any UV as my whites would discolor in minimal sun exposure.

 

I want to start building again as I have the bug again. I was thinking about using Bob Smith 30 minute which I have read good things about. However I will need to rig up some kind of turner. Someone I know told me they mad some lawn furniture a while back and coated it with Duralux Spar Varnish. I have seen this stuff in Home Depot. I was wondering if anyone has tried it and if it holds up over acrylic paints? Some varnishes I have seen over the years are amber fromm the get go. The HomeDepot listing sates it goes on clear.

 

This is the stuff (I think) 

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Duralux-Marine-Paint-1-qt-Clear-Spar-Varnish-M738-4/205127238

 

If anything, it may make a good sealer.......

 

 

I am interested to know if anyone has used it for top coat or for sealing wood.

Edited by aae0130

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Varnish is what was used before epoxy finishes were developed. Polyureathane floor finish is very durable as well

Edited by XBMX

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Stay away from 30 minute epoxies. As a general rule, the faster the cure the more brittle and sloppy the end result. You want a slow, steady cure for neat and durable finishes.

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Thanks gents.     Oddly enough I ended up with two posts on the same subject. Thats what happens when I start drinking some Jack while Im on the computer......

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