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Rattles

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I was told by Brad Buzzi quite awhile ago to insert the rattle down the face to avoid cracking the glass. I though about what he said

and it seem perfectly logical to surround the rattle with foam. I've been doing that for as long as that tip was given to me and

I must say sometimes my Crease Flys don't make it back alive yet the rattle is still "clicking"......

It amazing. I tried embedding the rattle in epoxy, and bass still smashed the glass rattles. 

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It amazing. I tried embedding the rattle in epoxy, and bass still smashed the glass rattles. 

 

Not embedded in epoxy Pete........I attach the foam body to the hook as usual. Next I open the face of the Crease Fly and drop a few drops of CA down the sides and along the hook shank to secure the body to the hook. Then slide the rattle down the face and put a foam plug in the face and finish off with an epoxy coating. As I have often stated, Crease Flys are a disposable, a solid foam body has more strength and makes better popping noise. If a bass crushes your Crease Fly, and they certainly can crush and destroy them, who cares about the glass rattle? I want to catch fish.......you can always make another fly.

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Well thread is a year plus old.   Curious if anyone has accumulated any additional objective evidence during the last two seasons that rattles make a difference in their catch success ?    ie:  Anyone fish a two fly rig one fly with rattle and one fly without, or one of each after one another to determine if one was better with a rattle ?

 

One of the reasons I ask is that I came across some discarded materials that would be great for making some decent rattles but wondering if I should go through the time and effort.    I've read a lot of pros and cons so wondering if a rattle mostly catches the attention of the fisherman and not the fish ::::::

 

HT

 

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2 hours ago, Striperknight said:

I tried a couple of things with them but found the glass ones always break.

 

That's one of the reasons I was asking.   I have some ultra thin walled stainless Hypo tubing that when cut and assembled wouldn't be any heavier than the glass rattles and I can't deform the easily.  Would make excellent long lasting rattles but should I go through the bother to make a bomb proof rattle if they don't help much?

 

HT

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I had my guide in NOLA was sold on rattles in poppers and Crease Flys. He explained that the rattle gets the fish to come back after a miss...sometimes they don't...because the noise keeps them interested. I sometimes put rattles in and on a trip somewhere I'll have em.

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Glass rattle alternative, not sure how much noise it's gonna make, but at least it wont shatter, should work with many fly patterns

 

 

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10 hours ago, ferret said:

Glass rattle alternative, not sure how much noise it's gonna make, but at least it wont shatter, should work with many fly patterns

 

 

Ferret,

 

I'm working on a shatterproof solution now.   Have ordered up some materials and once I build and test I'll post here.  The Pyrex rattles make a great sound but every fly I've tied with one the rattle has broken after less than a half dozen fish no matter what technique found and used to secure them to my flies.    Nature of the glass I guess.  If my idea works I'm hoping they'll be virtually indestructible.   Primarily looking at the larger size for large Crease / Poppers and large nighttime bait fish imitations. 

 

HT

 

 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

@HillTop this is an interesting question. My most productive night fly did not have a rattle in it.  But it also only produced in shallow 6' deep or less conditions where it was relatively clear and calm water, or in a light edge where fish were getting a clear look at the fly. It is a fly designed to make a massive frontal push and I am convinced that is more important than a rattle.  If fished along surface with mono leader ans floating line it makes a wake similar to a redfin plug. Alewife variant of a Rich Murphy Conomo Special.

 

But I found in other situations I know the rattle fly was more effective.  But its really key that you use a retrieve that activated the rattle.  For example deep fast water my version of Rich Murphy' Rattlesnake out produced the Conomo and a beast fleye from andrew custom flies.  I fish a deep swing, but I tuck rod under arm and hold line with right hand.  I give very short jerks to the tight line 4-6" max.  This jerking action during swing activated the two rattles in fly and I found it got bit more often in deep inlets near bottom structure.

 

The second presentation I call rattling.  Its deadsticking a crab or lobster fly with rattles.  You lift rod until feel tension then shake tip to activate rattle for 30 seconds then deadstick more.  It was calling fish out of eel grass beds and boulder field edges.  Use a full sinking line too.

 

Lastly I was czech style nymphing big rattle crab flies.  I found shaking throughout drift caught way more fish than letting it true dead drift.

 

I use platic jig rattles from a lure making website now and they work as well as pyrex in my opion but dont break.

 

So if you fish a rattling fly on a swing or other presentation that is not jigging or activating the rattle its a total waste of time.  That is my experience last year.

 

 Now to make my night flies more effective I in corporate a head that pushes tons of water, a rattle, a tail

that creates an "action", a long silhoutte and a mesh portion somwhere to add scent to the fly.  The five componets together I believe will make the flies catch large bass better in the dark.  What turned me on to this different design focus for a night fly pattern was Rich Murphy.  Rich mentions all of these charateristics in his night fly pattern section of book and last year I exclusively fished his conomo special, two night patterns (Rattlesnake and Quarter Moon Special) and a black beast fleye.  The beast and conomo hit key points of pushing water and silhouette.  In addition to Rich's night flies I made these two original night fly prototypes to fish this season.  The jig with curly tail is the "Skinner Special" after John Skinner whos books made me into the bucktail and jigging gear fisherman I am today.  The double hook fly is called the "McKenna Special" as its designed to fish like his double rigged sluggo which is one of my all time favorite striper lures. Both flies come in at 11-14" depending on shape and size of tail.  The tails come on and off with a small twist clip so they can be changed to adjust action, fall rate, and overall silhouette of the fly.

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Edited by The Graveyard Shift

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Buy these at lure parts online.  They are rattles for skirted jigs.  The slot allows easier tying to hook.  You can also attach inside ez bod tube like I do or Bob P uses heat shrink tubing to attach these rattles off bend of the hook on his  flies.  I took example from Bobs instagram.  

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Great info.

I saw some somewhere where someone was putting beads in tubing then sealing the ends with uv cure to make their own rattles.

This was to avoid breakage.

I'd image the glass gives a much better rattle sound then the tubing, but I'm going play around with this a bit since I have a lot of silicone and hard tubing available from making tube flies.

SF 

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3 mins ago, Stonefish said:

Great info.

I saw some somewhere where someone was putting beads in tubing then sealing the ends with uv cure to make their own rattles.

This was to avoid breakage.

I'd image the glass gives a much better rattle sound then the tubing, but I'm going play around with this a bit since I have a lot of silicone and hard tubing available from making tube flies.

SF 

 

SF,

Just about what I'm going to do.    I have a few hundred 6 inch long very thin walled (only .005" thick) Stainless tubes that are the same diameter as the large Pyrex Rattles (5/32").  Had these at work for a project that never took off.

 

I think for a given length the SS tubing is actually lighter than the Pyrex but much stronger.     Found a discount ball bearing store online where I can buy oddles of all size stainless ball bearings for about a dime each in 100 pc quantities.   So I've ordered up 2 different diameters and will start testing when they arrive.   Nice thing is I can make a rattle as short or long as I want (entire hook shank on inverted fly possibly).  I'm thinking the sound, metal on metal, will be better than the Pyrex but time will tell.  If this works I'll have a lifetime of rattles at my disposal and eliminate the breakage problem.

 

HT


 

 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

9 mins ago, HillTop said:

 

SF,

Just about what I'm going to do.    I have a few hundred 6 inch long very thin walled (only .005" thick) Stainless tubes that are the same diameter as the large Pyrex Rattles (5/32").  Had these at work for a project that never took off.

 

I think for a given length the SS tubing is actually lighter than the Pyrex but much stronger.     Found a discount ball bearing store online where I can buy oddles of all size stainless ball bearings for about a dime each in 100 pc quantities.   So I've ordered up 2 different diameters and will start testing when they arrive.   Nice thing is I can make a rattle as short or long as I want (entire hook shank on inverted fly possibly).  I'm thinking the sound, metal on metal, will be better than the Pyrex but time will tell.  If this works I'll have a lifetime of rattles at my disposal and eliminate the breakage problem.


 

 

HT

Please post thoughts, results and pictures after you give the metal tubes a go.

SF

Edited by Stonefish

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22 hours ago, The Graveyard Shift said:

@HillTop this is an interesting question. My most productive night fly did not have a rattle in it.  But it also only produced in shallow 6' deep or less conditions where it was relatively clear and calm water, or in a light edge where fish were getting a clear look at the fly. It is a fly designed to make a massive frontal push and I am convinced that is more important than a rattle.  If fished along surface with mono leader ans floating line it makes a wake similar to a redfin plug. Alewife variant of a Rich Murphy Conomo Special.

 

But I found in other situations I know the rattle fly was more effective.  But its really key that you use a retrieve that activated the rattle.  For example deep fast water my version of Rich Murphy' Rattlesnake out produced the Conomo and a beast fleye from andrew custom flies.  I fish a deep swing, but I tuck rod under arm and hold line with right hand.  I give very short jerks to the tight line 4-6" max.  This jerking action during swing activated the two rattles in fly and I found it got bit more often in deep inlets near bottom structure.

 

The second presentation I call rattling.  Its deadsticking a crab or lobster fly with rattles.  You lift rod until feel tension then shake tip to activate rattle for 30 seconds then deadstick more.  It was calling fish out of eel grass beds and boulder field edges.  Use a full sinking line too.

 

Lastly I was czech style nymphing big rattle crab flies.  I found shaking throughout drift caught way more fish than letting it true dead drift.

 

I use platic jig rattles from a lure making website now and they work as well as pyrex in my opion but dont break.

 

So if you fish a rattling fly on a swing or other presentation that is not jigging or activating the rattle its a total waste of time.  That is my experience last year.

 

 Now to make my night flies more effective I in corporate a head that pushes tons of water, a rattle, a tail

that creates an "action", a long silhoutte and a mesh portion somwhere to add scent to the fly.  The five componets together I believe will make the flies catch large bass better in the dark.  What turned me on to this different design focus for a night fly pattern was Rich Murphy.  Rich mentions all of these charateristics in his night fly pattern section of book and last year I exclusively fished his conomo special, two night patterns (Rattlesnake and Quarter Moon Special) and a black beast fleye.  The beast and conomo hit key points of pushing water and silhouette.  In addition to Rich's night flies I made these two original night fly prototypes to fish this season.  The jig with curly tail is the "Skinner Special" after John Skinner whos books made me into the bucktail and jigging gear fisherman I am today.  The double hook fly is called the "McKenna Special" as its designed to fish like his double rigged sluggo which is one of my all time favorite striper lures. Both flies come in at 11-14" depending on shape and size of tail.  The tails come on and off with a small twist clip so they can be changed to adjust action, fall rate, and overall silhouette of the fly.

 

@Graveyard Shift,

 

Can you show me a photo of how you incorporate a rattle in your crab flies ?     I can't visualize doing so unless it's a really large crab fly or fairly small rattles.   Thank you.

 

Also I can't see where your technique of deadsticking for 30 seconds gives you a corresponding rattling action on your fly for 30 seconds.  It's just hard to imagine that shaking the rod tip will transmit like energy all the way down the fly line, leader & tippet to actually move the fly any appreciable amount.  Once you start the technique you've probably moved the fly initially, set slack in the line and subsequent shakes probably don't affect the fly, at least as how I'd visualize it.   Having never done this it's only an uneducated guess.   I think I'd want to try it parallel to the beach somewhere with varying lengths of line out to see if I could actually see the end result for the applied effort.    

 

Now short quick strokes of your line, yes I see that as activating the rattles.   This is one of my re-purposed rattle/hook combinations from a crease fly that got destroyed and one of the few rattles that didn't break.  I like tying these on a popper hook as the offset bend allows angular placement of the rattle so the balls run up the ramp on a quick strip movement and then gravity does the rest.    Noise easily verified by holding this in my hand resting on the desktop and quickly moving my hand flat against the desk in a quick linear fashion with an abrupt stop. Sound is quite evident.  I try to place all my rattle in a like angular fashion to take advantage of the stripping motion.

 

hookrattle.jpg.047db6b27e1dc20aaba5a353f6d707bc.jpg

 

 

 

HT

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Posted (edited) · Report post

2 hours ago, HillTop said:

 

@Graveyard Shift,

 

Can you show me a photo of how you incorporate a rattle in your crab flies ?     I can't visualize doing so unless it's a really large crab fly or fairly small rattles.   Thank you.

 

Also I can't see where your technique of deadsticking for 30 seconds gives you a corresponding rattling action on your fly for 30 seconds.  It's just hard to imagine that shaking the rod tip will transmit like energy all the way down the fly line, leader & tippet to actually move the fly any appreciable amount.  Once you start the technique you've probably moved the fly initially, set slack in the line and subsequent shakes probably don't affect the fly, at least as how I'd visualize it.   Having never done this it's only an uneducated guess.   I think I'd want to try it parallel to the beach somewhere with varying lengths of line out to see if I could actually see the end result for the applied effort.    

 

Now short quick strokes of your line, yes I see that as activating the rattles.   This is one of my re-purposed rattle/hook combinations from a crease fly that got destroyed and one of the few rattles that didn't break.  I like tying these on a popper hook as the offset bend allows angular placement of the rattle so the balls run up the ramp on a quick strip movement and then gravity does the rest.    Noise easily verified by holding this in my hand resting on the desktop and quickly moving my hand flat against the desk in a quick linear fashion with an abrupt stop. Sound is quite evident.  I try to place all my rattle in a like angular fashion to take advantage of the stripping motion.

 

hookrattle.jpg.047db6b27e1dc20aaba5a353f6d707bc.jpg

 

 

 

HT

HT I will post a crab and lobster fly if I get a chance to tie.  Life has been crazy.  The fly weighs 3/8 oz it takes a lot to move it and I fish it on a 11' 10wt.  I use a long leader that is a combo of floro and braided line for sensitivity and cutting through current with maximum strength.  The approach is borderline so not for a fly purist.  But it is delivered with a fly cast so still fly fishing.  It uses foam to lift the rear of hook so it taps nicely along bottom when you twitch to activate rattle. The lobster seemed to be the better rattler so will make one of those and post.  Its a variation of Rich Murphy's pattern.

 

I decided for dead drifting crabs flies are superior to lobsters because green crabs tumble and cannot swim.  Lobsters swim so a dead drift approach is not great.  rattling a lobster tight line looks like it moving along bottom it also snags a lot.  I have a crab I use for dead drifting it uses no rattles, very little weight, and is almost all mesh tubing.  I sink it with split shot under a glowing strike indicator in inlet current flows.  The split shot snag less than a weighted fly and keep fly close

to bottom.  the mesh is perfect for adding scent if one chooses.  Pro-Cure Shedder Crab is the way to go.  molting produced a particular scent bass cannot ignore.  The larger than normal profile helps keep schoolies from taking the fly keeping it in water for big girls, but large schoolies will eat both the crab and lobster from time to time

 

The lobster and dead drift crabs are on 7/0 owner jig hooks.  it will make sense when you see the flies.  I attached a picture of a medium size crab at 2.5"wide carpace. The really large ones are almost twice this size. The crabs seem to molt in size order for reproduction with largest ones in early July with the classes getting profressively smaller.  I found a scientific study on green crabs that confirms my field observations.   So my crab flies are 4.5" wide tip to tip of carpace and 1.5" deep.

DE3A0BDB-5FD7-4C4A-B913-5FAC4DBA0C83.jpeg

72E85565-A177-4452-A27C-A357ABA39A61.jpeg

Edited by The Graveyard Shift

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