Sudsy

We welcome Rep Frank Pallone and his challenger Brent Sonnek-Schmelz to a question and answer forum

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This thread will serve as the forum.......... 

 

They will each be stopping in throughout the day tomorrow, Friday Nov 4th, to answer our questions.

All questions are fair game. not just fisheries issues

 

The only rule is that all posts are civil and respectful, posts deemed otherwise will be removed.

 

 

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Hello Brent- good luck in the upcoming election.

What are your thoughts on beach replenishment and its affects on the ecosystem along the new jersey coast?

 

Thanks

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Congressman Pallone, why is the ACOE allowing Municipalities, who have signed on with the State of NJ and agree to the ACOE regulations in order to receive the restoration sand from the Elberon to Loch Arbour Reach Project, to create ordinances limiting parking to residents only in areas adjacent to the restored beaches?

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Congressman Pallone, with global warming resulting in rising sea levels why would you continue to fight for funds for beach replenishment which is at best a temporary fix at the cost of millions of tax payer dollars and the destruction of the marine environment?

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Since one of you will be in Washington this national tidewater access question is one I'd like to have an answer to.

I have always wondered why access laws are controlled by the states and are allowed to vary so widely. They are all supposed to be based on our "unalienable rights" as spelled out in the Public Trust Doctrine.

How can some states, New York and Connecticut for example, completely ignore this and make access to tidal lands so difficult ?

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That is quite a large question, but an important one.  The quick answer is that while beach replenishment is important for a variety of factors - shore protection, tourism, etc. - I think it is being done in completely the wrong way in New Jersey.  Our technique seems to be to suck up sand, dump it in a pile, push it in a straight line, then wait for a storm to drag it away so we can do it again year after year.  

 

This process results in damage to ecosystems on the beach, along the surf, where the sand is retrieved and where the sand ends up.  For the surfers and fishermen/women who use our shore daily, it is devastating.

 

I am positive there are better ways to solve our "beach problem." First, we have to accept that beaches change daily, there can never be absolute permanence.  Second, we should investigate how to use structure, dunes and the natural ebb and flow of sand to create sustainable beaches.  There are other ways, and not exploring them while committing to a 50 year plan of brute force beach replenishment is a bad idea.

 

Hello Brent- good luck in the upcoming election.
What are your thoughts on beach replenishment and its affects on the ecosystem along the new jersey coast?

Thanks

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Good morning gentlemen,

 

IBSP - this is another restricted access question.

 

Context: Other muscle-powered craft seem to be allowed to launch from ocean-side IBSP beaches but kayakers not. We kayakers are not asking for carte blanche, and are keenly aware of the possible dangers involved with each trip. All we're asking for is a single designated launch site adjacent to one of the parking lots. There is precedent in other NJ Parks as well as other State's parks.

 

The results of the most recent attempt by one of our members:

 

http://www.stripersonline.com/surftalk/topic/636338-ocean-access-ibsp/

 

 

The Question: If you were elected, would you do whatever is necessary to get the park equally accessible to all fisherfolk, irrespective of their personal preference of methodology?

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I agree with you.  Use of the water and coastline requires adequate access. Personally, my preference is for the Oregon model which provides for virtually unfettered access along the whole coast. 

 

In New Jersey, the standard set in Matthews v. Bay Head is a good one.  But we need to be vigilant to prevent towns from reducing access over time, as we see happening in deal and Long Branch.  Access should also include adequate parking - such as on public streets.

 

The problem flows back to the common law foundations of the Public Trust Doctrine.  It has developed over time in different ways in different places, which has resulted in the various interpretations and levels of enforcement.  Since these are local issues, state rules hold.

 

That said, there are ways the federal government can nudge the states towards more access.  An example is how the federal government used the carrot of highway funds to get states to increase the drinking age to 21.  I would favor having federal funds dedicated for beach replenishment, dredging and other coastal improvements be dependent on the state providing adequate beach and shoreline access and use.  

Wealthy homeowners along the beach don't own the view, the beach or the water.  They shouldn't get to set the rules on access. 

 

 

 

Sudsy, on 03 Nov 2016 - 9:11 PM, said:

 


Since one of you will be in Washington this national tidewater access question is one I'd like to have an answer to.

I have always wondered why access laws are controlled by the states and are allowed to vary so widely. They are all supposed to be based on our "unalienable rights" as spelled out in the Public Trust Doctrine.

How can some states, New York and Connecticut for example, completely ignore this and make access to tidal lands so difficult ?

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Yes, I support access for all types of craft and use.  The key factor in limitation for me is whether a person puts someone else at risk - i.e., surfing/paddling on a dedicated swimming beach could be dangerous to others.  But if the risk is entirely personal, then all people are free to make their own decisions and should be able to drop in a kayak.

Good morning gentlemen,

IBSP - this is another restricted access question.

Context: Other muscle-powered craft seem to be allowed to launch from ocean-side IBSP beaches but kayakers not. We kayakers are not asking for carte blanche, and are keenly aware of the possible dangers involved with each trip. All we're asking for is a single designated launch site adjacent to one of the parking lots. There is precedent in other NJ Parks as well as other State's parks.

The results of the most recent attempt by one of our members:

http://www.stripersonline.com/surftalk/topic/636338-ocean-access-ibsp/


The Question: If you were elected, would you do whatever is necessary to get the park equally accessible to all fisherfolk, irrespective of their personal preference of methodology?

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That is quite a large question, but an important one.  The quick answer is that while beach replenishment is important for a variety of factors - shore protection, tourism, etc. - I think it is being done in completely the wrong way in New Jersey.  Our technique seems to be to suck up sand, dump it in a pile, push it in a straight line, then wait for a storm to drag it away so we can do it again year after year.  

 

This process results in damage to ecosystems on the beach, along the surf, where the sand is retrieved and where the sand ends up.  For the surfers and fishermen/women who use our shore daily, it is devastating.

 

I am positive there are better ways to solve our "beach problem." First, we have to accept that beaches change daily, there can never be absolute permanence.  Second, we should investigate how to use structure, dunes and the natural ebb and flow of sand to create sustainable beaches.  There are other ways, and not exploring them while committing to a 50 year plan of brute force beach replenishment is a bad idea.

 

 

As a follow up to this. For both candidates.

 

Have you or would you consider reaching out to certain grassroots organizations with proven track records of establishing and maintaining a natural barrier system for beach protection in the southern Ocean County beach area? Both Midway beach and Island Beach State Park are prime examples of proper use of land buffers which help to limit beach erosion due to storm impact.

 

These groups, along with participation from local government and the general public, can kickstart the development of natural options which would provide a long term approach to the issue. These solutions would then become self maintaining rather than requiring the constant outlay of taxpayer dollars for decades to come.

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I have not reached out as I am still a private citizen.  But yes, I would.  That is exactly the type of discussion that should occur.  The discussions should be wide ranging.  We should be speaking to people in Australia and other countries who are going through this as well, too.  

 

 

As a follow up to this. For both candidates.

 

Have you or would you consider reaching out to certain grassroots organizations with proven track records of establishing and maintaining a natural barrier system for beach protection in the southern Ocean County beach area? Both Midway beach and Island Beach State Park are prime examples of proper use of land buffers which help to limit beach erosion due to storm impact.

 

These groups, along with participation from local government and the general public, can kickstart the development of natural options which would provide a long term approach to the issue. These solutions would then become self maintaining rather than requiring the constant outlay of taxpayer dollars for decades to come.

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A big thank you to both gentlemen for joining us. Anyone who spends anytime at the shore knows what a colossal waste of money and effort beach replenishment is. It destroys the ecosystem and provides short term relief. It's time to start using the term "strategic retreat" and use that beach replenishment money to buy out properties and create open spaces. It works in North Jersey along the rivers that are flood prone and open public space is created. Have either of you given any thought to this solution?

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In Coney Island the ACOE is building stone breakwaters to protect the infrastructure

Why are they removing the stone breakwaters (jettys) here ?

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I understand your feelings on the matter.  Strategic retreat would be a solution of last resort, be incredibly expensive, and have a lot of pushback from home owners.  It will also require changing roadways that run close to the shore.  I don't think we are there yet along our coast.

 

 

A big thank you to both gentlemen for joining us. Anyone who spends anytime at the shore knows what a colossal waste of money and effort beach replenishment is. It destroys the ecosystem and provides short term relief. It's time to start using the term "strategic retreat" and use that beach replenishment money to buy out properties and create open spaces. It works in North Jersey along the rivers that are flood prone and open public space is created. Have either of you given any thought to this solution?

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