johndtuttle

Okuma Komodo SS 471P: First Look

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Posted (edited)

OK, another post giving a preview of another "new" reel introduced at ICAST 2016 and just coming into stock now at TD etc.

 

This is the Okuma Komodo SS a "400" sized LP baitcaster that uses an all stainless steel gear train and makes ~30 lbs of drag.

 

I put "new" in parenthesis because this is simply a larger version of the Komodo 364P that has been out for several years and is now considered a proven design. Okuma has updated the cosmetics and went to all stainless for an even tougher version that epitomizes the "small reel for big fish" concept. The reel weighs only about 16 oz but has the capacity (~250 of 65 lb) of a Spherogosa 8k but those weigh  22 oz...its not sealed of course, but it has massive cranking power for it's size. These reels are real powerhouses for their size and weight.

 

Got about ~250 yards of PP 65 lb on there:

 

P1120161_zpsogc9zxol.jpg

 

Next to a Revo Toro Rocket (more about that later). It looks much bigger but its not. They are both about the same height. The Komodo SS is just a little wider for more capacity:

 

P1120157_zpsiyag8k5m.jpg

 

Matte grey with black and silver:

 

P1120149_zpsvtqfywpk.jpg

 

Only ~16 oz with a 120mm power handle. This is the 471P or the 400 size in 7:1...

 

Still has a clicker for live baiting or slow trolling:

 

P1120184_zpsgafxegd4.jpg

 

One of the improvements over the older version is a much simpler method of adjusting the Centrifugal Brakes:

 

P1120164_zpsb1xmres0.jpg

 

 

Another cosmetic shot:

 

P1120166_zps1eveejxd.jpg

 

The Thumb Button opening into the body is well protected from splashes entering the reel:

 

P1120181_zps4u0klydo.jpg

 

Titanium Nitride coating for the line guide. That's a little wax left from spooling tightly with power pro:

 

P1120167_zpsvvefpkm1.jpg

 

Raceway for the brakes inside the graphite left side cover:

 

P1120169_zpsn69wicfg.jpg

 

Inside the gear box pure stainless steel beef:

 

P1120175_zpsvyfvawdl.jpg

 

Drag is well greased:

 

P1120176_zps2x2acyc0.jpg

 

Main gear is MASSIVE at ~54mm and a spool line height of only about 40mm. A Tranx (22 oz and a much larger reel) has a main gear (brass) that is only 50 mm with a much larger spool in proportion. The Komodo 471P SS should be the new king of cranking power and power transmission for it's speed (7:1 ~38" IPT).

 

P1120177_zpsvhxfxcse.jpg

 

Ok, so why are these reels so exciting to me? Cranking power to weight. Try to imagine a Penn Senator with the Main Gear 25% larger than the spool....or a spinning reel with a Main Gear 25% wider than the rotor width...you can't because the reality is that other reel geometries produce Gears that are working against spools/rotors that have much wider radii...a huge mechanical disadvantage. This is why every Bass Pro uses a conventional reel for crank baits...if you are casting and retrieving something with resistance this is the way to go. Think SP Minnows, Mag Darters and such fished fast...that is where these reels are a joy. Oh, and also with a big fish on. :)

 

Lets take a look under that bracket retaining the Main Shaft as it can be a problem area:

 

P1120179_zpsf5qm9tmt.jpg

 

Its well greased with a synthetic waterproof grease to protect that bearing in it's receptacle which is notorious in all of the LP reels for saltwater collection. Someday it would be nice to actually seal this area...:

 

P1120180_zps1w0l1hdj.jpg

 

Ok, so all of this is first impressions. I fished a Komodo 364p for over 2 years without a hiccup, but we will have to see if anything in the production of these larger models comes up....so far, very impressed.

 

If you haven't fished one of these you are missing one of the finest reels Okuma makes and not at all painful on the pocket. Top notch top to bottom and the Komodo SS can probably make an argument for "Best in Class for the Money" in this hyper-competitive segment of "Large Low Profile" reels albeit by a small margin over it's competitors. All of these reels are just that good, imho. :D
Edited by johndtuttle

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You should get the Tailwalk version and do a side by side!

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Various questions ....

 

John, I recall a prior post in which you remarked that, generally speaking, magnetic antibacklash systems are better for heavy payloads (8'n'bait, and such) but centrifugal systems are preferable for lighter ones (that is, plugs and such in moderate sizes and weights).

Assuming this to be so, I infer that the designers had plug casters in mind. For what market do you see this as optimal? Musky, yes, tropical plugging for tarpon and some snappers ... it's huge overkill for black bass.

 

You were very impressed by the drag design innovations in the last Revo Toro somethingorother that you reviewed. I see a big woven washer. What drag is Okuma claiming for this puppy?  (I'll discount it by half, but I'd like to know.) You had a reason for going with 65 lb. line, what do you contemplate catching with this?

 

What's the Tailwalk thing that Scoobydoo is talking about?

 

I wonder if Penn will ever stick a toe into this increasingly busy segment. The International baitcasters appear quite out of date.

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Posted (edited)

Various questions ....

 

John, I recall a prior post in which you remarked that, generally speaking, magnetic antibacklash systems are better for heavy payloads (8'n'bait, and such) but centrifugal systems are preferable for lighter ones (that is, plugs and such in moderate sizes and weights).

Assuming this to be so, I infer that the designers had plug casters in mind. For what market do you see this as optimal? Musky, yes, tropical plugging for tarpon and some snappers ... it's huge overkill for black bass.

 

You were very impressed by the drag design innovations in the last Revo Toro somethingorother that you reviewed. I see a big woven washer. What drag is Okuma claiming for this puppy?  (I'll discount it by half, but I'd like to know.) You had a reason for going with 65 lb. line, what do you contemplate catching with this?

 

What's the Tailwalk thing that Scoobydoo is talking about?

 

I wonder if Penn will ever stick a toe into this increasingly busy segment. The International baitcasters appear quite out of date.

 

Hey Brian, 

 

Centrifugal brakes are ideal for very light things because they brake more at the beginning then release to get max distance. But what this means is that very light plugs and bucktails down to 1/3 of an ounce can be handled by reels even this size (or a live bait). The 350 size handles down to 1/4 oz. Heavier stuff gets handled by the spool tension knob that works as a crude version of magnetic brakes, just a little harder to fine tune. Between the two it handles anything from 1/3 oz to 1 lb monster swimbaits. Some of the Largemouth Bass guys do use these as huge rubber has caught some record bass as well as huge Muskie.

 

I'll test the drag here in a minute with my hand scale. I bet it gets a large portion of the ~30 lbs listed at the top of the spool. It is a stack of 3 carbon fiber washers, I just dint pull them all out and photograph the whole stack.

 

I put 65 lb on there for Tuna to 100 lbs. Out here on the west coast guys do also often use all of the big LP baitcasters in a "Kelp Cutter" set up with 80 lb braid. You cast your weedless bait straight into the weeds and if hooked up you just use the rise and fall of the boat to saw through the bull kelp. I'll use it for throwing poppers and other baits to Tuna and Yellowtail mostly, but 65 lb is good all around.

 

Heavier braid is also a little more forgiving for all day casting in adverse conditions.

 

Scoobs is talking about the Tailwalk Elan which is very similar or the same (I have never seen one). Both this and (?) the Komodo SS are made in the Banax factory (?) not sure. The Komodo says made in Korea but I simply don't care about where it was made other than that but can ask Okuma if you want. Nothing about point of origin changes the strength of the build which is apparent as soon as it is opened up. Korea is a top maker.

Edited by johndtuttle

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Sweet! Joe do you think it'd do for offshore slow-jigging duty? Seems to fit the bill: high capacity, relatively quick retrieve, strong drag.

 

 

Hellz yes! :D

 

Ima use it for slow pitch flat falls etc.

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Hey Brian, 

 

Centrifugal brakes are ideal for very light things because they brake more at the beginning then release to get max distance. But what this means is that very light plugs and bucktails down to 1/3 of an ounce can be handled by reels even this size (or a live bait). The 350 size handles down to 1/4 oz. Heavier stuff gets handled by the spool tension knob that works as a crude version of magnetic brakes, just a little harder to fine tune. Between the two it handles anything from 1/3 oz to 1 lb monster swimbaits. Some of the Largemouth Bass guys do use these as huge rubber has caught some record bass as well as huge Muskie.

 

I'll test the drag here in a minute with my hand scale. I bet it gets a large portion of the ~30 lbs listed at the top of the spool. It is a stack of 3 carbon fiber washers, I just dint pull them all out and photograph the whole stack.

 

I put 65 lb on there for Tuna to 100 lbs. Out here on the west coast guys do also often use all of the big LP baitcasters in a "Kelp Cutter" set up with 80 lb braid. You cast your weedless bait straight into the weeds and if hooked up you just use the rise and fall of the boat to saw through the bull kelp. I'll use it for throwing poppers and other baits to Tuna and Yellowtail mostly, but 65 lb is good all around.

 

Heavier braid is also a little more forgiving for all day casting in adverse conditions.

 

Scoobs is talking about the Tailwalk Elan which is very similar or the same (I have never seen one). Both this and (?) the Komodo SS are made in the Banax factory (?) not sure. The Komodo says made in Korea but I simply don't care about where it was made other than that but can ask Okuma if you want. Nothing about point of origin changes the strength of the build which is apparent as soon as it is opened up. Korea is a top maker.

Banax makes some fine machines for sure.

I once owned the starion 400 years ago and they also make several more pieces that are similar right now.

I still have my pfluger trion -66L which is very close to the starion and made there as well.fast spool speed and the drawback was the Teflon drag washers which I swapped out to carbs and it was and still is a decent machine.

I am liking this new komodo on the real side.

what kinda money is this one at the moment?

 

 

H-H

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Banax makes some fine machines for sure.

I once owned the starion 400 years ago and they also make several more pieces that are similar right now.

I still have my pfluger trion -66L which is very close to the starion and made there as well.fast spool speed and the drawback was the Teflon drag washers which I swapped out to carbs and it was and still is a decent machine.

I am liking this new komodo on the real side.

what kinda money is this one at the moment?

 

 

H-H

 

 

Tackle Direct has the 364P size for $220 and this model 471P for $250.

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