Jep11

What a Carpy season

83 posts in this topic

I should be wasting more time chasing carp, those are impressive catches. They have lots of fight in them too, for me, I don't eat them or need them so they go back. Friend of mine used to make dough balls out of bagels, whiskey and corn, it was a good mixture as the carp loved it. Thanks for sharing and putting thoughts in my head.

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I was throwing a white popper and up from the deep comes this black and orange fish and hits it, but I pulled the popper to soon. I never thought I would see the day.

A few years ago I began seeing what looked like orange koi swimming around, this one looked like a koi crossed with a carp.but never before did I see one go for a popper.

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Carp are brown/bronze in color.

Any fish with bright colors (orange, black and/or white) are goldfish. Koi are just a specific breed of goldfish.

 

The problem most people have is presuming they are one and the same....which they aren't!

 

Goldfish are more of a problem than carp, as goldfish are known to eat EVERYTHING. They eat vegetation, they eat small fish, they eat fish eggs!

Carp are primarily bottom feeders, content to root around for small crustaceans and insects in and around plant roots. That's why they are seen "tail-waving" in shallow waters.

 

Carp, although an introduced species, is far less invasive than goldfish. Oh, and they fight a hell of a lot better too!!!

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Humans had no effect. The waterway in question was totally and exclusively affected and ruined by carp as they hoovered the bottom clean,killed all the plant life by smothering it w silt from their endless rooting and basically ate all the food in the stream. It's a smallish stream,about a mile and a half in length to the base of a waterfall where no fish get up past it. The larger stream it flows into used to have no carp in it in the sixties,but they started moving in in the 70s and by the mid 80s it was a muddy carpfest. The small stream used to have excellent pan fishing and the rare local pickerel population,all gone,replaced and out competed you carp.

I'll bet my next paycheck all yall arguing for carp are too young to have ever seen a waterway w/o carp. Heck,I bet ain't none of yall was even born before 1980!

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Carp are brown/bronze in color.

Any fish with bright colors (orange, black and/or white) are goldfish. Koi are just a specific breed of goldfish.

 

The problem most people have is presuming they are one and the same....which they aren't!

 

Goldfish are more of a problem than carp, as goldfish are known to eat EVERYTHING. They eat vegetation, they eat small fish, they eat fish eggs!

Carp are primarily bottom feeders, content to root around for small crustaceans and insects in and around plant roots. That's why they are seen "tail-waving" in shallow waters.

 

Carp, although an introduced species, is far less invasive than goldfish. Oh, and they fight a hell of a lot better too!!!

Tim, you got your koi/goldfish backwards.  All koi are fancy colored carp.  Goldfish are well, just that, gold fish (through selective breeding).  After a few generations in the wild goldfish revert back to their natural, olive/brown coloration.  Goldfish rarely get over 2lbs and are FAR less common in the wild than common carp.

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I've seen goldfish that were 5, 10 and some close to 20 lbs.

Goldfish continue to grow as long as they have enough room and food.

Goldfish and Koi are part of the same "branch" of the family tree, and carp are another branch.

I have fished for carp and "released" goldfish (as there are no such thing as "wild" goldfish) and they both have different feeding habits.

Goldfish feed on whatever they can, and WILL feed on the surface regularly.

Carp feed on whatever they can find on the bottom. They root around weed roots for insects and small crustaceans.

The ONLY times I've seen a carp at the surface were when they were tail-finning while feeding in shallow waters, sitting in shallow waters or jumping (breaching).

If you didn't know what to look for, you'd probably miss seeing them until they see you and take off like a rocket!

Many of the ones I see in the waters I fish are big, REALLY BIG carp! Heck, I've had one ram my kayak years back when I was kayak fishing one of my favorite night time ponds.

It didn't see me until I was right next to it, and it bolted at my bow, thumped into it and continued on, leaving me laughing my arse off!

 

If they weren't so selective about when and where they will feed, I'd fish for them more often.

 

Check out the Jamaica Pond thread in the MA forum, and they mention a huge goldfish that had been living there for years.

I've seen it (years ago) and it was at least 3 feet long and 20+lbs. back then!

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No, Common Carp and koi are the genetically the same species Cyprinus carpio.  Koi are intentionally bred carp, selected to be brightly colored.  Goldfish are Carassius auratus, different species of fish.  Both are in the minnow family (Cyprinidae).  5, 10, and 20lb "gold" fish are Koi not Goldfish.  Some of the largest Goldfish on record are around 16inches and 5lbs.  And yes there is such a thing as 'wild' Goldfish.  They're not native to N. America but were introduced here in the late 1600s and now have established breeding populations all over the US.

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Not to split hairs, but saying that carp and koi are the same species (maybe part of the same, but possible different sub-species) would be like equating that although they are all dogs, a Yorkie, a bulldog and a Great Dane are all same.

That's the point I should have been stressing.

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I should be wasting more time chasing carp, those are impressive catches. They have lots of fight in them too, for me, I don't eat them or need them so they go back. Friend of mine used to make dough balls out of bagels, whiskey and corn, it was a good mixture as the carp loved it. Thanks for sharing and putting thoughts in my head.

 

If at some point you do want to try them, here's a great recipe:

 

Marinate several carp filets overnight in a mixture of low sodium soy sauce, a little orange juice, a pinch or two of garlic, and some cilantro

When ready, place the filets on a cedar plank, add some salt and pepper

Cover in tinfoil and broil lightly at 300 - 325 in the oven for 10 - 15 minutes

Remove from oven, throw away the carp and eat the plank

 

Bon apatite!

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Here in MN, it is against the law to release carp, so most of them end up rotting on the banks of the river. Okay, knowing that it is illegal to release carp, it is f'ing distasteful to leave them rotting on the banks of the river.

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Carp are brown/bronze in color.

Any fish with bright colors (orange, black and/or white) are goldfish. Koi are just a specific breed of goldfish.

 

The problem most people have is presuming they are one and the same....which they aren't!

 

Goldfish are more of a problem than carp, as goldfish are known to eat EVERYTHING. They eat vegetation, they eat small fish, they eat fish eggs!

Carp are primarily bottom feeders, content to root around for small crustaceans and insects in and around plant roots. That's why they are seen "tail-waving" in shallow waters.

 

Carp, although an introduced species, is far less invasive than goldfish. Oh, and they fight a hell of a lot better too!!!

It is just like how people get smallmouth buffalo mixed up with carp. They are not the same species, nor the same genus, but they are 100%native to our waterways.

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Here in MN, it is against the law to release carp, so most of them end up rotting on the banks of the river. Okay, knowing that it is illegal to release carp, it is f'ing distasteful to leave them rotting on the banks of the river.

I find those kind of laws to be unnessesary. The carp are here to stay, might as well let them continue to support the food chain.

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If at some point you do want to try them, here's a great recipe:

 

Marinate several carp filets overnight in a mixture of low sodium soy sauce, a little orange juice, a pinch or two of garlic, and some cilantro

When ready, place the filets on a cedar plank, add some salt and pepper

Cover in tinfoil and broil lightly at 300 - 325 in the oven for 10 - 15 minutes

Remove from oven, throw away the carp and eat the plank

 

Bon apatite!

You eat carp before?

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I've seen goldfish that were 5, 10 and some close to 20 lbs.

Goldfish continue to grow as long as they have enough room and food.

Goldfish and Koi are part of the same "branch" of the family tree, and carp are another branch.

I have fished for carp and "released" goldfish (as there are no such thing as "wild" goldfish) and they both have different feeding habits.

Goldfish feed on whatever they can, and WILL feed on the surface regularly.

Carp feed on whatever they can find on the bottom. They root around weed roots for insects and small crustaceans.

The ONLY times I've seen a carp at the surface were when they were tail-finning while feeding in shallow waters, sitting in shallow waters or jumping (breaching).

If you didn't know what to look for, you'd probably miss seeing them until they see you and take off like a rocket!

Many of the ones I see in the waters I fish are big, REALLY BIG carp! Heck, I've had one ram my kayak years back when I was kayak fishing one of my favorite night time ponds.

It didn't see me until I was right next to it, and it bolted at my bow, thumped into it and continued on, leaving me laughing my arse off!

 

If they weren't so selective about when and where they will feed, I'd fish for them more often.

 

Check out the Jamaica Pond thread in the MA forum, and they mention a huge goldfish that had been living there for years.

I've seen it (years ago) and it was at least 3 feet long and 20+lbs. back then!

The challenge of catching such a selective fish is just as fun as the battle.

 

It is one thing to catch the 10lb and even the 20lb carp, they are relative babies. Catching the biggest of the big carp, 30lbs and up is where things become ultra challenging. Only one fish is said to be more intellegent then the common carp, those would be your buffalo. Catching these guys once they have been around the block is no easy feat, it is part of the reason European carp fishing techniques are some of the most complex methods of fishing around. At that level, corn on a hook just doesn't cut it anymore. Lol!

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