Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
J

Loss of virility

Rate this topic

25 posts in this topic

OK now that I have you attention..... I actually have a question regarding the virility of older Striped Bass.

 

I recently read somewhere that at a certain age Stripers become less fecund (fruitful in offspring). In other words....less capable to procreat as age increases.

 

Does anyone know anything about this? Or where I can look to read more?

 

Please limit the replies to Stripers.

Or am I asking too much?

 

 

[This message has been edited by JayR (edited 03-22-2003).]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's the opposite, exactly. Larger female striped bass have more and larger eggs than the younger spawners. The young that hatch from those larger eggs have a higher survival rate than smaller young from younger spawners. Not to mention, a LARGE female spawner is passing on LARGE fish genetics. Not all bass are likely predisposed to grow LARGE. Some likely have genes that are more likely to make weak, small or even sickly young. The simple fact that a female grew to say 50# means that the genes she would pass on to her young are more genetically likely to be able to grow that big as well.

 

The big fish aren't fecund argument is a lie designed to support the killing of big fish. It's so tackle shop heros can ease their conscience a bit and sleep at night after weighing in their 10th 30pound bass for the season, making sure the tackle shop new how to spell their name correctly for when the newpapers call in the morningwink.gif

 

I'm hoping Flounder responds, he has all the official stuff that explains this better than I can smile.gif

 

TimS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The big fish aren't fecund argument is a lie designed to support the killing of big fish. It's so tackle shop heros can ease their conscience a bit and sleep at night after weighing in their 10th 30pound bass for the season, making sure the tackle shop new how to spell their name correctly for when the newpapers call in the morningwink.gif

 

I'm hoping Flounder responds, he has all the official stuff that explains this better than I can smile.gif

 

TimS

 

I hope so too about Annodyte wink.gif .

It seems all I hear is that at a certain age stripers are less likely to produce. I have read this in books authored by some "experts", I believe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually Tim that was my understanding as well but the article had me thinking and I would like to re-read it. Just can't find it. I would certainly like to see what material had been referenced.

 

I would like to know more about the subject.

 

So if anyone knows of any studies that have been completed, I would be most apreciative.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

II have read this in books authored by some "experts", I believe.

 

There's a lotta times when fishing "experts" like to think they are biologistswink.gif Good thing biologists don't write stuff as if they were fishing experts, ain't it? wink.gif

 

TimS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fecundity is related to body size. Simply put:

Bigger fish = more eggs

 

Bigger fish have more energy to put into reproduction than smaller fish. But there is also a risk of death when a fish puts a lot of energy into reproduction. Thats what the Pacific salmon do: they put all their energy into one spawn, hope its successful, then they die.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not 100%, but I would think that when a fish is near the end of its natural life span, there would be a slight dropoff in fecundity. But thats not a problem since we don't see many bass that old.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

WOW! cwm24.gif I am shocked! I had no idea this was the case. I too always though the LARGE was almost unable to reproduce. I guess I've been a victim of some sort of rationalistic brainwashing scheme purported and perpetuated by the masses. cwm31.gif Anyway, doesn't much matter to me. My biggest last year was a 24#er which was of course promptly released. When I land that 50#er of my dreams we'll revive this thread because I don't know what I'd do at that point!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am stil on the fence with this one. I know of no other animal that is virile throughout life. All other animals slow down and become infertile Why would fish be different?

 

I really would like to se some studies that have been done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll try to find one but there are several studies on older bass showing that while they certainly produce more and larger eggs they also slow their reproduction as they get older. Instead of every year, it may be every other year or every 3 years that they reproduce. No one really knows if they get to a point where they may stop reproducing.

 

As Jay stated no animal can continue to reproduce more and more every year. Eventually we all get old and less productive. The question is what is the real lifespan of a bass. Are the 40-50 lbers in their prime or are they getting old. Personally I think old age for them begins to set in on the 60+ pounders. The 40's and 50's are in their prime.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not about stripers but a nice study back in the 80's,Jeff Ross & Tonya Stevens examined two old red drum females that were 49 & 51 and they were senescent, i.e., gonads had atrophied.

 

However they also had a 51-year-old fish that had just spawned.

 

Does anyone have any contacts with striper biologists? I'm sure they could answer this.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't like to go against convention. But I will tell something I was told back in 1998. I would run across ever now and then while fishing Stripers in the fall on the James River Pier, they were 18-23 ich fish. He said he had worked in a hatchery during the recovery. I asked him what would have happened with the huge fish that was rummored to have been caught in MD(if in season it would have been a new world record) the past spring, and his remark was that it may lay eggs but they probably would not hatch. They had found that the Females between 32 and 38 inches worked best. Now he did point out that it could be do the stress of capture and moving to the hatchery that complicated the issue. Now I do know a couple of other people that may have better(documented info) that I have not bothered to ask. I throw this out there for what ever it is worth. It is nothing more than hearsay, from someone who seemed geniune. It also fits with most other anamals. Now if you ask me how would the eggs of a 20 inch fish (we have them spawning) vs a 34 inch fish it would be hands down in the 34 inch fishes favor. Now for the gene pool, the larger fish that sucessfully spawns at say 40-50 inches its genes will be truly adding large fish genes to the pool assuming the male it breeds with has like genes.

OH by the way I landed 6 fish over 40 inches on the beach at Sandbridge tonight(out of 10) all were released since their bellies were fat, a very short night. Thanks slipnot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tim, you state a LARGE female spawner would pass on LARGE fish genes. But why not the smaller fish too. Obviously a larger female has had a longer life than a smaller one, whos to say the smaller one, when she reaches the age of the larger female would not be 10 inches longer, giving her offspring larger genes to work with.

Why wouldnt a younger females offspring have a good shot at survival verses an older female? That does seem quite opposite of what we all are used to. Tick-Tick....Tick-Tick...thats the ole Biological clock ticking.

 

AllenC

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.