Surfrat815

Anyone flounder fishing yet?

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I've been thinking of trying for them in my childhood summer blackback spots... if we caught them there in the summer back then.. wouldn't it follow that now(ish) would be a decent time to catch them now?

 

is that English?

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A sunny day, a change to outgoing tide about 10:30 -11 AM, then in the early to mid afternoon after the sun has had some time to warm the bottom, fish the shallow spots (2 -3 feet of water) in the estuary of your choice, chum up a lot, and you can likely have some luck. 

 

Later this week should bring the right weather conditions, but unfortunately, not the right tides. Late next week is better tide wise if the weather co-ops.

Edited by Steve in Mass

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A sunny day, a change to outgoing tide about 10:30 -11 AM, then in the early to mid afternoon after the sun has had some time to warm the bottom, fish the shallow spots (2 -3 feet of water) in the estuary of your choice, chum up a lot, and you can likely have some luck. 

 

Later this week should bring the right weather conditions, but unfortunately, not the right tides. Late next week is better tide wise if the weather co-ops.

Good analysis!

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That shallow? I may try.

 

I used to go to a certain spot on the South Shore and fish off a bridge over a shallow bay. Everyone would try to get as close to the channel as they could for the deep water.....me, not so much. I would walkout till I got to a spot that the bottom just disappeared from my view and set up there. While the other guys fishing the deeper water would stand there for hours with the skunk, or maybe 1-2 fish, I would catch half a dozen or more.

 

Flounder, being a bottom feeding flat fish, don't need real deep water. They can move along the shallows to find their food. And this early in the year on with conditions as I outlined above, the shallows warm up a whole lot faster than the deep water, making the fish more active in those areas.

 

I don't flounder fish as nearly much as I used to, but about 2-3 years ago I went to this spot at about this time of year (would have to check my old calendars) and came home with 4 nice keepers while the others got skunk. ;)

 

Biggest issue this time of year is getting sea worms (my preferred bait of choice), but if you call enough places, they can be had.

Edited by Steve in Mass

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I used to go to a certain spot on the South Shore and fish off a bridge over a shallow bay. Everyone would try to get as close to the channel as they could for the deep water.....me, not so much. I would walkout till I got to a spot that the bottom just disappeared from my view and set up there. While the other guys fishing the deeper water would stand there for hours with the skunk, or maybe 1-2 fish, I would catch half a dozen or more.

 

Flounder, being a bottom feeding flat fish, don't need real deep water. They can move along the shallows to find their food. And this early in the year on with conditions as I outlined above, the shallows warm up a whole lot faster than the deep water, making the fish more active in those areas.

 

I don't flounder fish as nearly much as I used to, but about 2-3 years ago I went to this spot at about this time of year (would have to check my old calendars) and came home with 4 nice keepers while the others got skunk. ;)

 

Biggest issue this time of year is getting sea worms (my preferred bait of choice), but if you call enough places, they can be had.

Thats true. And if you cant find seaworms what about bucktails and gulp? Any good at all this early?

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When I first moved to the Cape in that late 70's the flounder fishing from shore this time of year was unbelievable, fishing from the bridges was like being on a party boat. Your could fill a 5 gallon bucket in a few hours on a falling tide. The good part of the early season was that there weren't as many crabs stealing bait as there were when the water warmed up. That number of blackback flounder in estuaries on the Cape do not exist today, they disappeared in the 90's and have not rebounded.

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Thats true. And if you cant find seaworms what about bucktails and gulp? Any good at all this early?

 

 

I suppose nothing is impossible, but winter flounder really aren't apt to chase down a jig like summer flounder are. Have to remember, while related, they are different, and winter flounder small mouths with no teeth per se and scavenge the bottom to suck up their prey.

 

Short of sea worms, clam "lips" work as well as mussels and squid strips, just not as well. Some guys use night crawlers, but they don't last long in the salt water.

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I'm waiting for that water temp to come up a little more but the boat and flounder gear are ready to go. No more left in the freezer got to fill it up again. 

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With that cold early April (it seems we had April in March and then March the 1st two weeks of April)I had moved the launch date to April 25th (6 days from now) and that is still a GO! A few more days like yesterday should have the flounder on a tear. I'm looking forward to the next several months. Anyone else?

 

JC

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