CaryGreene

Metal, from Tins to Jigs to Casting Spoons- Everything You Need to Know

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3 hours ago, jjdbike said:

Thanks much!

I also caught that VMC in-line recommendation.

You sold me on the & the Daddy Mac Iron Candy.

Much respect & appreciation!

JD

Absolutely JD. Coincidentally, we're not exactly comparing an Apple to an Apple regarding the Simano Colt Sniper & the Daddy's Long Cast jigs. Reason being, Daddy's "only" offers .5 oz, 1 oz & 1.4 oz options. If we compared Daddy's 1 oz, it's a full 1/4 oz heavier than the Colt Sniper (both are 3" Long). Daddy's makes these jigs for casting distance. a 1 oz Daddy's will outcast the Colt Sniper in a comparable length, but the Colt Sniper will hang in the zone longer due to weighing less. 

 

Shimano doesn't offer a 2 1/2" model, where as Daddy's has that base covered. The Daddy's will be closer to the size of normal Silversides. Daddy's also has a more slender side profile, making it a better choice for Silversides. 

 

Daddy's is the right color for Rainbait, but is about twice the size of a Rainbait. A bait that large will actually work occasionally. But not consistently. I know this from Fly-Fishing. When I get the size right I catch more consistently than when I'm using a profile too large. This being the case, I'd advocate using certain Metals for certain species. I'd also recommend evaluating some local builder's work. Dan Tinman here on SOL has some promising looking designs but I haven't evaluated them or used them yet. We're really looking hard at the way a jig is constructed, how heavy it is, what the sheening is like, jig swimming action, eyes, durability, color schemes, light bouncing characteristics & a lot more. The evaluation criteria is pretty stringent. I highlighted below my faves but you may find a lot of people with different opinions than I. All purpose imitators are Deadly Dicks, Kastmasters, Swedish Pimples, Crippled Herring.etc. You can fish all fall long with just a few of these types of lures & just keep it really simple.

 

If I had to pick one single lure for Albies it would be a Deadly Dick or a Crippled Herring. If I was going to add two more it would be a Fish Snax Peanut & an Iron Candy Bullet, a Daddy's or a Hogy Heavy Minnow.

 

If you want to get into specific imitators, your ability to react goes up & you'll have better overall results.  The lures in Red would be priority lures IMO & as long as you had at least a couple realistic looking ones & a couple attractors you'd do fine. 

 

I'd also absolutely carry some white & some pink Fish Snax plastics with both swing heads & unweighted hooks. 

 

Bay Anchovies = Hogy Heavy Minnow or Crippled Herring. Fish Snax Peanut Jig, Iron Candy Bullet, Cabela's Real Image

 

Silversides = Daddy's Long Cast, Iron Candy Bullet, Fish Snax Albie Jigs, Iron Candy Cuta Casting Jig, Point Wilson Herring Dart (glow), Hogy Heavy Minnow, Hogy Epoxy Jigs, Deadly Dicks, Joe Bags Resin Jigs, Iron Candy Magic Missile, Colt Sniper

 

Peanut Bunker = Fish Snax Peanut Jigs, Point Wilson Herring Darts (great colors, but no brown back, waaahahahaha), Crippled Herring, Cabela's Real Image, Iron Candy Bullet, Daddy's, Hogy Peanut Bunker, Hogy Epoxy Jig, Charlie Graves Tins (1W, Peanut Bunker), Little Cleo, DOA Peanut Bunker, Colt Sniper, Kastmaster, Hopkins Shorty's

 

3"+ Sandeel = Graves D5, Point Jude Sandeel, Point Jude Pojee, Daddy's Long Cast 1 or 1.4 oz in Sandeel, 

 

In clear water on a nice, sunny fall day, Albies get selective. On windy days & in broken water, you have to help them find your lure. It helps to know what bait they're on also. Pay close attention. That's a key factor. 

Edited by CaryGreene

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12 mins ago, CaryGreene said:

Absolutely JD. Coincidentally, we're not exactly comparing an Apple to an Apple regarding the Simano Colt Sniper & the Daddy's Long Cast jigs. Reason being, Daddy's "only" offers .5 oz, 1 oz & 1.4 oz options. If we compared Daddy's 1 oz, it's a full 1/4 oz heavier than the Colt Sniper (both are 3" Long). Daddy's makes these jigs for casting distance. a 1 oz Daddy's will outcast the Colt Sniper in a comparable length, but the Colt Sniper will hang in the zone longer due to weighing less. 

 

Shimano doesn't offer a 2 1/2" model, where as Daddy's has that base covered. The Daddy's will be closer to the size of normal Silversides. Daddy's also has a more slender side profile, making it a better choice for Silversides. 

 

Daddy's is the right color for Rainbait, but is about twice the size of a Rainbait. A bait that large will actually work occasionally. But not consistently. I know this from Fly-Fishing. When I get the size right I catch more consistently than when I'm using a profile too large. This being the case, I'd advocate using certain Metals for certain species. I'd also recommend evaluating some local builder's work. Dan Tinman here on SOL has some promising looking designs but I haven't evaluated them or used them yet. We're really looking hard at the way a jig is constructed, how heavy it is, what the sheening is like, jig swimming action, eyes, durability, color schemes, light bouncing characteristics & a lot more. The evaluation criteria is pretty stringent. I highlighted below my faves but you may find a lot of people with different opinions than I. All purpose imitators are Deadly Dicks, Kastmasters, Swedish Pimples, Crippled Herring.etc. You can fish all fall long with just a few of these types of lures & just keep it really simple.

 

If I had to pick one single lure for Albies it would be a Deadly Dick or a Crippled Herring. If I was going to add two more it would be a Fish Snax Peanut & an Iron Candy Bullet, a Daddy's or a Hogy Heavy Minnow.

 

If you want to get into specific imitators, your ability to react goes up & you'll have better overall results.  The lures in Red would be priority lures IMO & as long as you had at least a couple realistic looking ones & a couple attractors you'd do fine. 

 

I'd also absolutely carry some white & some pink Fish Snax plastics with both swing heads & unweighted hooks. 

 

Bay Anchovies = Hogy Heavy Minnow or Crippled Herring. Fish Snax Peanut Jig, Iron Candy Bullet, Cabela's Real Image

 

Silversides = Daddy's Long Cast, Iron Candy Bullet, Fish Snax Albie Jigs, Iron Candy Cuta Casting Jig, Point Wilson Herring Dart (glow), Hogy Heavy Minnow, Hogy Epoxy Jigs, Deadly Dicks, Joe Bags Resin Jigs, Iron Candy Magic Missile, Colt Sniper

 

Peanut Bunker = Fish Snax Peanut Jigs, Point Wilson Herring Darts (great colors, but no brown back, waaahahahaha), Crippled Herring, Cabela's Real Image, Iron Candy Bullet, Daddy's, Hogy Peanut Bunker, Hogy Epoxy Jig, Charlie Graves Tins (1W, Peanut Bunker), Little Cleo, DOA Peanut Bunker, Colt Sniper, Kastmaster, Hopkins Shorty's

 

3"+ Sandeel = Graves D5, Point Jude Sandeel, Point Jude Pojee, Daddy's Long Cast 1 or 1.4 oz in Sandeel, 

 

In clear water on a nice, sunny fall day, Albies get selective. On winy days & in broken water, you have to help them find your lure. It helps to know what bait they're on also. Pay close attention. That's a key factor. 

Excellent and important info to have as I'm putting in orders now.:howdy::theman:

Thank you again!

JD

 

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3 hours ago, Southcoastphil said:

I tried various grits of paper, but they clogged almost immediately, hence the use of steel wool and pads.

 

YMMV.

Hi Phil,

 

If you have an old, scratched up tin, start by cleaning it some sudsy, warm water & use a scrub brush like an old toothbrush or a stout shop brush. This removes any gunk & exposes any scratches you'll have to deal with. 

 

If you have scratches, you need to remove them. To do that -- use course sandpaper designed for metal (320 grit or higher) Then, move to a finer grain. Hold the tin in a vice while sanding.

 

Once all scratches are removed, or if you don't have any or don't mind the ones you do have, the simple polishing method is to apply some polishing cream & buff with a rag or a green dish cleaning pad or heavy piece of felt. Then, clean it with a dry rag & if you have some chalk powder, use that to clear off excess polishing cream. 

5f23009ae95ab_Screenshot2020-07-30at1_16_27PM.png.3f205b86bf9a567d52e38f652da521bf.png

 

You can take your polishing skills to a much higher level if you have a handheld drill (cordless is best) or even better, a Dremmel. You can get a Rough, a Medium metal polishing head & a Soft felt polishing head & go to work on the Tin a bit. These are available on line & sold as kits usually This will get you where you want to be in terms of beautiful, glassy finish & it's how I do it at home. 

 

 

Pop on your safety glasses & a dust mask & a good pair of work gloves. Put the tin in a vice & go to work on it. Use a hard compound, black or brown. Then use Yellow, White & finally Black polishing compounds & clean after each polishing step with warm, soapy water.  You can obtain the various metal polishing compounds by using google & ordering online. This video is SUPERB!

 

 

 

Once you have a nice, clean, polished, gleaming Tin, you just have to maintain that shine. Periodic polishing helps prolong a Tin's life. You can also seal the Tin after polishing. Dipping it in Boiled Linseed Oil is an old time method. The theory was, Linseed Oil is basically a water sealant. Many plug builders will do this with a plug (30 second dip bath method). 

 

If you store your Tins in a dank, soggy environment, the Boiled Linseed Oil will actually help white mold to grow. You can leave Tins untreated or you can seal them, it's up to you. I seal them after I polish them. Not sure it really matters. The key is to polish & remove residual polish. 

 

Once you start polishing with a drill bit, you'll never go back to any other way of restoring metal shine. SOME guys even use grinding wheels. Kind of overkill for a Tin though, IMO. 

Edited by CaryGreene

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A modest chirp of disagreement, but only a modest one.  I think the Graves tins are best fished with a loop knot on the leader. Maximum action. No biggie either way.

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2 hours ago, Southcoastphil said:

@CaryGreene, I'm not making jewelry.

Nope, just polishing it! That second video is pretty cool. At the end he shows the black grit, the Dremmel & the polishing wheel combining to produce a glass like finish. I ordered the kit & the Dremmel 4 years ago & when I saw this video, I thought of guys who want to refurbish Tins & also keep then glowing like glass. The black grit produces amazing finishes on silver lures. Also works on gold. 

 

You find a lot of older lures here & there Phil. After sanding, you should consider polishing with a drill or a Dremmel. Easy peazy & the results are excellent. Or, you could use some Barkeepers Helper or the Metal paste & call it a day if you need a simpler solution. Pretty sure the Stripers won't care either way. 

 

I love my Tins gleaming so for me it was the Dremmel & the grit. Also started polishing brass with my kit & attacked all my steel tools as well. I have a lot of fun polishing up metal Tins & Metals. on rainy days. :) 

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9 mins ago, BrianBM said:

A modest chirp of disagreement, but only a modest one.  I think the Graves tins are best fished with a loop knot on the leader. Maximum action. No biggie either way.

I wouldn't argue your sentiments Brian. I change lures too much as I rotate so that's why I prefer an XL Ring to a clip for speed changes. It's a matter of personal preference I guess. 

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11 mins ago, BrianBM said:

The posts about the customized reel deserve their own thread.

I know. I kept it in here to keep it kind of exclusive but you're no doubt right. Jamie's video is soooo cool though. Love that guy! Most people on this website will probably never even see the thread, it's already buried in this one. Alas....I suppose I could put it in the Reels thread we did a while back. 

 

I kind of thought the Charlie Graves thread could live alone as well. But, it's all under one roof here I guess. 

Edited by CaryGreene

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Whats out there for light tackle tins?   1oz and under.

Summer time I fish light. 7-8ft rod. 10-14lb line. 1oz and under lures

 

  I'd love a sandeel tin that was 1/2 - 3/4oz.  Same with the Charlie Graves Sandflea. 

 

These are what I know of....

Charlie Graves J1. 

Kastmasters

Hopkins

@Dan Tinman peanuts & busters

Krocidile. 

Crippled Herring. 

 

But I'd love more options. Probably don't need more. But that's not fun at all

 

 

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21 hours ago, PSegnatelli said:

Whats out there for light tackle tins?   1oz and under.

Summer time I fish light. 7-8ft rod. 10-14lb line. 1oz and under lures

 

  I'd love a sandeel tin that was 1/2 - 3/4oz.  Same with the Charlie Graves Sandflea. 

 

These are what I know of....

Charlie Graves J1. 

Kastmasters

Hopkins

@Dan Tinman peanuts & busters

Krocidile. 

Crippled Herring. 

 

But I'd love more options. Probably don't need more. But that's not fun at all

 

 

The Graves Sand Flea is actually a pretty beastly Tin. At 2 1/2 oz it's too much weight to be considered viable for many beaches. Fish are mostly caught in the wash, in cuts, 150 feet & in. The shape of the sand flea is pretty cool but it's just too heavy. A smaller Sand Flea would be cool but we have a flood of other options to cover this base (see below). 

 

One thing you will notice about Surf Casting is that there is an "IDEAL WEIGHT RANGE" that we would prefer to be in. Charlie Graves certainly understood this. Most of his Pure Tin Tins are 1 1/2 oz to 2 oz which is perfect for Surf Casting. Because of the volume that his Tins have, they are very light & slow sinking. You get the added rod load & enjoy the correlating casting distance while at the same time getting to flutter through different cuts & feeding alleys. You have enough pop to reach over far off Sand bars also. 

 

Lighter lures won't do this as well with your standard Surf Rods. However & to your points Segs, a specialty rod will send a 1/2 Tin to the moon. I like a slightly longer stick for this purpose so I use the 8 1/2 ft 2-piece Ron Aara Lammy. Centruy makes a nice 8 1/2' 2 piece 1/2 oz to 2.5 oz Slinghot which is an ideal smaller lures rod as well. They are both ++ for this type of application you are talking about. 

 

As far as finding a Sand Eel  Tin 1/2 to 3/4 oz I think you might want to just use soft plastics with Jig Heads in that range. Small Diamond Jigs with tube tails are another option (no problem finding 1/2 oz & I've even seen 3/8 oz minis around. The old Polish Sand Eel was in the weight range you were looking for. I put it in this thread a while back, it's on page 19, post 272. They don't make it any more though. I have 5 of them to my name at this point. I carry one in my big plug bag. 

 

In addition to the lures you listed above, here are some other options:

  • Iron Candy Bullets - 3/4 oz & 2" long, nice all purpose silhouette, great for Peanut Bunker also. (rapidly becoming a must carry Metal - freaking catches fish)
  • Hogy Heavy Minnows - 1/2 oz & 1 1/2" good for Rain Bait, Silver-Sides & Peanuts (outstandingly effective)
  • Hogy Epoxy Jigs - 3/8 oz & 2 1/2", excellent for Silver-Sides (lethal summertime bait, Silver-Sides are almost always in the wash)
  • Fish Snax Peanut Jigs -  1/2 oz & 2", good for Rain Bait & Silver Sides (great lure, they need to do a 3/8oz 1" though, it would be amazing) That said, terrific Metal
  • Fish Snax Albie Jigs - .53 oz & 2 5/8" good for Silver-Sides (excellent Metal)
  • Cabela's Real Image Jigs - 1/2 oz & 2" good for Rain Bait, Silver-Sides & Peanuts (this lure has a cult like following among fishing department employees at Cabela's by the way - East Hartford, CT store). 
  • Iron Candy Cuta Casting Jigs - 1 oz 2 3/4", best in class casting performance & very good for Silver-Sides. Can be used as a searching pattern to work a beach & windy days have zero effect on this lure. Casts like it should be illegal, you'll feel like you should get a ticket.
  • Shimano Colt Sniper - 3/4 oz & 3 1'2", nice do it all larger profile jig. Ahi Brown is the best color. Absolutely catches fish. 
  • Point Wilson Herring Darts - 1 oz & 2 1/2", good for Silver-Sides & Peanuts. Pearl Bellies & gorgeous flash. Best in class deep jig but also swims really nice. Great balance. Can be cast & retrieved no-problemo. A pretty cool secret weapon jig. Most guys on the East Coast don't even know what they are. (unless they read this thread). Color assortment is really cool. 
  • Deadly Dick Standard Casting Lures - 1/8 oz to 1 oz (tons of sizes), 1 1/2" to 2" Awesome for what you're looking for. Similar to a Kastmaster. Really good for Peanuts.
  • LIttle Cleo Spoons - 8 sizes under 1 oz. Good for Peanuts in shallower water. Spoon really flutters nice & has enough oomph to cast okay too. Lots of uses for saltwater. Hardly anybody uses them.
  • Sweedish Pimples - 7 sizes 1 oz or under - comes in pearl which is a good saltwater color. Highly effective, great for bouncing through a cut or a bit deeper water. 
  • Krocodile Spoon - Lots of sizes under 1 oz & has a super flutter to it. Good for Peanuts. 

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On 7/30/2020 at 2:21 PM, CaryGreene said:

Hi Phil,

 

If you have an old, scratched up tin, start by cleaning it some sudsy, warm water & use a scrub brush like an old toothbrush or a stout shop brush. This removes any gunk & exposes any scratches you'll have to deal with. 

 

If you have scratches, you need to remove them. To do that -- use course sandpaper designed for metal (320 grit or higher) Then, move to a finer grain. Hold the tin in a vice while sanding.

 

Once all scratches are removed, or if you don't have any or don't mind the ones you do have, the simple polishing method is to apply some polishing cream & buff with a rag or a green dish cleaning pad or heavy piece of felt. Then, clean it with a dry rag & if you have some chalk powder, use that to clear off excess polishing cream. 

5f23009ae95ab_Screenshot2020-07-30at1_16_27PM.png.3f205b86bf9a567d52e38f652da521bf.png

 

You can take your polishing skills to a much higher level if you have a handheld drill (cordless is best) or even better, a Dremmel. You can get a Rough, a Medium metal polishing head & a Soft felt polishing head & go to work on the Tin a bit. These are available on line & sold as kits usually This will get you where you want to be in terms of beautiful, glassy finish & it's how I do it at home. 

 

 

Pop on your safety glasses & a dust mask & a good pair of work gloves. Put the tin in a vice & go to work on it. Use a hard compound, black or brown. Then use Yellow, White & finally Black polishing compounds & clean after each polishing step with warm, soapy water.  You can obtain the various metal polishing compounds by using google & ordering online. This video is SUPERB!

 

 

 

Once you have a nice, clean, polished, gleaming Tin, you just have to maintain that shine. Periodic polishing helps prolong a Tin's life. You can also seal the Tin after polishing. Dipping it in Boiled Linseed Oil is an old time method. The theory was, Linseed Oil is basically a water sealant. Many plug builders will do this with a plug (30 second dip bath method). 

 

If you store your Tins in a dank, soggy environment, the Boiled Linseed Oil will actually help white mold to grow. You can leave Tins untreated or you can seal them, it's up to you. I seal them after I polish them. Not sure it really matters. The key is to polish & remove residual polish. 

 

Once you start polishing with a drill bit, you'll never go back to any other way of restoring metal shine. SOME guys even use grinding wheels. Kind of overkill for a Tin though, IMO. 

Here is a little bit more info on polishing metals for anyone curious. Firs, here's a great video just to show you how effective a Dremmel tool can be. In this video, the dude is using the Flex Shaft attachment. A Dremmel Kit with the attachment is around $100 from a Hardware Store or a Home Depot. 

 

 

I've tried the Flitz polishing compound & it's really good as a general do it all polish. The guy in this video uses it so you can see how easy it is. If you want a simple solution, this would be pretty good for lures. Coincidentally, you can also polish plastic lures that get discolored with rust marks or mold...etc. 

5f26cf19b3a5b_Screenshot2020-08-02at10_33_59AM.png.45d032f0a2f7c3d2d8547026d95f2b22.png

 

If you lock a Tin down in a small hand held vise-grip you can use a cordless drill with a buffing wheel attachment also, that will give a pretty nice shine to any metal lure, no matter what it's made of or plated with. Simply coat the tin with the Fitz cream using a rag & then start buffing at a slow speed. Then increase speed once the compound is absorbed into the Buff Wheel. Buff Bits are necessary to attach the Buff Wheel. Buff Wheels are available in three basic grits. You may need to work with a slightly coarser Wheel first, then proceed to the softer one once you've removed serious oxidization. 

5f26d9722be79_Screenshot2020-08-02at11_16_13AM.png.09c8273b48f4bc4ccb06d0c556c8c8c7.png

 

Fitz makes a Buff Ball attachment also, but I've tried it on lures & it's pretty clumsy. The Wheels give better results imo. 

 

5f26ce68485be_Screenshot2020-08-02at10_12_32AM.png.ad27ca9d60f8247033a0530030f38c8e.png

Best results - I mean MIRROR finishes, are achieved with the Dialux polishing compounds & the Dremmel Flex Shaft Attachment. I made the at a glance to un-confuse people regarding polishing compounds & what metals they are good for.

 

My dad was a Shop teacher & he used to have me down in the shop at home working with all sorts of gizmos. One of them was the Dremmel. We also had a number of Grinding Wheels. These compounds are about $7.50 a brick or so - last I checked (even cheaper if you buy them in bulk). 

 

You can use a vice grip to hold the Flex shaft, then simply move the Tin or the lure. Or, you can grip the Tin firmly use move the tool around. Either way seems to work well. I kind of prefer moving the Flex Shaft tool myself while also manipulating the Tin. 

 

For Tins I like a two step polish process so I start with the Yellow (which is specifically for softer metals like Tin, which are called Non-Ferous) & then I use the Black to get that mirror like finish. 

 

Most fishing lures are Non-Ferous metals. (copper, lead, nickel, tin, titanium and zinc, and alloys such as brass). Certain metals just don't shine up well due to being extra soft & non reflective. Lead comes to mind. Others shine up very well. Tin & Brass for example. White metals are comprised of various alloys & generally, due to the composition being varied, will shine up best. However, don't sleep on Tin. It's white bright when polished. 

 

The Yellow compound also works great on plastic lures if you need to remove baked on crud. Cotton "mops" (that you screw the dremel attachment) or polishing bits & wheels are all you need. 

 

5f26d177a047f_Screenshot2020-08-02at10_44_27AM.png.1eb94cdca28580f251adfc59d9faf4c4.png

 

 

Screenshot 2020-08-02 at 11.03.58 AM.png

 

Now that we've looked at some solutions, here's why I like the Dremmel with the Flexible Shaft Adapter best for lure working, including polishing Tin & also polishing plastic lures. 

 

Dremmels spin at 5,000 rpm to 35,000 rpms. That's 20 to 30 times faster than a Drill. At those speeds, the Dremmel produces near miraculous results when it comes to polishing. In short, it's a baller tool. The Dremmel itself is a bit blulky, but the Flexible Shaft Adapter is a nice, handheld size & extremely fast. 

 

My fairly sweet Makita Cordless Drill spins at 2,000 RPM's on max setting. Enough to polish a Tin? Yes, it will do the trick. But the Dremmel can cut down through scratches & all sorts of crud. 

 

At the very least I'd recommend going with a Polishing Bit & a 2" wheel for a drill if you want to touch up lures & polish Tins. If you already own a Dremmel, then all you need is the Flexible Shaft Adapter & a few Polishing compounds (Yellow & Black for sure). The compounds definitely do produce superior two step results as compared to other pastes like the Flitz. The Flitz is nice on Chrome but if you're looking for a glass like finish, the Compounds are the way to go. 

Screenshot 2020-08-02 at 4.46.23 PM.png

Edited by CaryGreene

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5 hours ago, CaryGreene said:

The Graves Sand Flea is actually a pretty beastly Tin. At 2 1/2 oz it's too much weight to be considered viable for many beaches. Fish are mostly caught in the wash, in cuts, 150 feet & in. The shape of the sand flea is pretty cool but it's just too heavy. A smaller Sand Flea would be cool but we have a flood of other options to cover this base (see below). 

 

One thing you will notice about Surf Casting is that there is an "IDEAL WEIGHT RANGE" that we would prefer to be in. Charlie Graves certainly understood this. Most of his Pure Tin Tins are 1 1/2 oz to 2 oz which is perfect for Surf Casting. Because of the volume that his Tins have, they are very light & slow sinking. You get the added rod load & enjoy the correlating casting distance while at the same time getting to flutter through different cuts & feeding alleys. You have enough pop to reach over far off Sand bars also. 

 

Lighter lures won't do this as well with your standard Surf Rods. However & to your points Segs, a specialty rod will send a 1/2 Tin to the moon. I like a slightly longer stick for this purpose so I use the 8 1/2 ft 2-piece Ron Aara Lammy. Centruy makes a nice 8 1/2' 2 piece 1/2 oz to 2.5 oz Slinghot which is an ideal smaller lures rod as well. They are both ++ for this type of application you are talking about. 

 

As far as finding a Sand Eel  Tin 1/2 to 3/4 oz I think you might want to just use soft plastics with Jig Heads in that range. Small Diamond Jigs with tube tails are another option (no problem finding 1/2 oz & I've even seen 3/8 oz minis around. The old Polish Sand Eel was in the weight range you were looking for. I put it in this thread a while back, it's on page 19, post 272. They don't make it any more though. I have 5 of them to my name at this point. I carry one in my big plug bag. 

 

In addition to the lures you listed above, here are some other options:

  • Iron Candy Bullets - 3/4 oz & 2" long, nice all purpose silhouette, great for Peanut Bunker also. (rapidly becoming a must carry Metal - freaking catches fish)
  • Hogy Heavy Minnows - 1/2 oz & 1 1/2" good for Rain Bait, Silver-Sides & Peanuts (outstandingly effective)
  • Hogy Epoxy Jigs - 3/8 oz & 2 1/2", excellent for Silver-Sides (lethal summertime bait, Silver-Sides are almost always in the wash)
  • Fish Snax Peanut Jigs -  1/2 oz & 2", good for Rain Bait & Silver Sides (great lure, they need to do a 3/8oz 1" though, it would be amazing) That said, terrific Metal
  • Fish Snax Albie Jigs - .53 oz & 2 5/8" good for Silver-Sides (excellent Metal)
  • Cabela's Real Image Jigs - 1/2 oz & 2" good for Rain Bait, Silver-Sides & Peanuts (this lure has a cult like following among fishing department employees at Cabela's by the way - East Hartford, CT store). 
  • Iron Candy Cuta Casting Jigs - 1 oz 2 3/4", best in class casting performance & very good for Silver-Sides. Can be used as a searching pattern to work a beach & windy days have zero effect on this lure. Casts like it should be illegal, you'll feel like you should get a ticket.
  • Shimano Colt Sniper - 3/4 oz & 3 1'2", nice do it all larger profile jig. Ahi Brown is the best color. Absolutely catches fish. 
  • Point Wilson Herring Darts - 1 oz & 2 1/2", good for Silver-Sides & Peanuts. Pearl Bellies & gorgeous flash. Best in class deep jig but also swims really nice. Great balance. Can be cast & retrieved no-problemo. A pretty cool secret weapon jig. Most guys on the East Coast don't even know what they are. (unless they read this thread). Color assortment is really cool. 
  • Deadly Dick Standard Casting Lures - 1/8 oz to 1 oz (tons of sizes), 1 1/2" to 2" Awesome for what you're looking for. Similar to a Kastmaster. Really good for Peanuts.
  • LIttle Cleo Spoons - 8 sizes under 1 oz. Good for Peanuts in shallower water. Spoon really flutters nice & has enough oomph to cast okay too. Lots of uses for saltwater. Hardly anybody uses them.
  • Sweedish Pimples - 7 sizes 1 oz or under - comes in pearl which is a good saltwater color. Highly effective, great for bouncing through a cut or a bit deeper water. 
  • Krocodile Spoon - Lots of sizes under 1 oz & has a super flutter to it. Good for Peanuts. 

Thanks CG.    I'm a bit of an odd duck in my own unique world.  I have a few medical issue that affect my stamina.  So it's one reason I prefer to go light.  I can just fish longer.      

 

Anything I can do to minimize my exhaustion, I do.  Simple cast and retrieve lures sit higher on my go-to list than stuff I need to work.     

 Just tryin to work smarter not harder. 

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1 hour ago, PSegnatelli said:

Thanks CG.    I'm a bit of an odd duck in my own unique world.  I have a few medical issue that affect my stamina.  So it's one reason I prefer to go light.  I can just fish longer.      

 

Anything I can do to minimize my exhaustion, I do.  Simple cast and retrieve lures sit higher on my go-to list than stuff I need to work.     

 Just tryin to work smarter not harder. 

Happy to help Segs, That's one of the things I love about the Charlie Graves Tins. because of their mass to weight ratios they actually shink very slowly and you just flatter them home You don't have to do a lot. Between the Keel on the bottom of the Tin & the Rudder on the Top, they land correctly and then they start swimming & that Keel, with such a smooth sheen rides very unstable side to side yet it tracks straight ahead perfectly. The end result is an excellent fluttering action.

 

The Iron Candy Bullet has nice action that isn't hard to impart as does the Crippled Herring.

Edited by CaryGreene

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