CaryGreene

Metal, from Tins to Jigs to Casting Spoons- Everything You Need to Know

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Cary, like Rookee, I fish the South Shore's open beaches, inlets and back bays near inlets. I can't physically maintain balance on riprap or jetties, or wade much beyond my knees. I look to tin to lend me the distance that this costs, as much as anything else. A tin that flutters is every bit as nice as a plug's motion, IMHO, and in daylight - meaning once the sun is actually up - I fish with a tin two-thirds of the time. Extracting the best action from a tin requires a bit more attention then people seem to give to them. With that in mind, I prefer to fish a tin on a loop knot.  Fluorocarbon seems stiffer, per pound test, then mono, and for that reason my running line usually ends in a swivel and 3' of fluorocarbon, with a tin on a loop knot.

 

If your tin comes within sight with a few baitfish following, you're doing it right. Ralph Votta has remarked on this at shows I've attended, and who knows more about tin them he? Not I.

 

I fish Mt. Sinai Harbor, McAllister Park, Miller Place Beach and a few other places in the neighborhood on the North Shore, but tend to do that with a flyrod first.

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The Shimano Waxwing isn't metal. It does kill 'em when they're around. I watched bluefish hunt it down in some clear water on a boat. It was quite remarkable. Yep they're expensive and they don't cast well but the action is very good.

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P.S.  Diamonds with tubes are also, IMHO, generally fished too fast and in too unbroken a retrieve. Let them bump bottom, retrieve at a reasoned pace ... My $0.02.

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A fair bit of work went into that first post. Thank you, Cary.

 

IMHO the leading mistake made by most casters is that they fish tins entirely too quickly. Even with bluefish, a tin should be fished slowly enough to flutter. It's NOT the same as using a diamond jig on a partyboat. If in doubt, stop and let it flutter on a slack or semi-slack line. If the bottom permits, hit the bottom often, exactly as you would with a bucktail.

 

 

Sure did, and he deserves kudos.  :th:

 

Having grown up in RI, doesn't bother me to see that Pt. Jude stuff either.

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Great list.  Impossible to really rank or pick a favorite - it will change from night to night and over the season.

 

Two more to think about.

 

John Skinner got me using a variant of the diamond jig - a spoon jig with a tube attached when sand eels are around. More action than a diamond jig. (Terminal Tackle Company online if not in your shop.)

 

3659_255_large.jpg

 

 

 

 

Roberts Rangers.  Okay, they are a hunk of plastic and not a hunk of metal - but they cast a mile, and sink a little slower than metal would - try the bounder (1 3/4 oz.), or whistler (2 1/2 oz.) when peanut bunker are around - especially if blues are in the area. For those who never got over kindergarten art - easy to add eyes, gills, spots, stripes with a sharpie magic marker. 

 

Whistler-White-With-Red-Stripe.jpg

Edited by charliestriper

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Cary, like Rookee, I fish the South Shore's open beaches, inlets and back bays near inlets. I can't physically maintain balance on riprap or jetties, or wade much beyond my knees. I look to tin to lend me the distance that this costs, as much as anything else. A tin that flutters is every bit as nice as a plug's motion, IMHO, and in daylight - meaning once the sun is actually up - I fish with a tin two-thirds of the time. Extracting the best action from a tin requires a bit more attention then people seem to give to them. With that in mind, I prefer to fish a tin on a loop knot.  Fluorocarbon seems stiffer, per pound test, then mono, and for that reason my running line usually ends in a swivel and 3' of fluorocarbon, with a tin on a loop knot.

 

If your tin comes within sight with a few baitfish following, you're doing it right. Ralph Votta has remarked on this at shows I've attended, and who knows more about tin them he? Not I.

 

I fish Mt. Sinai Harbor, McAllister Park, Miller Place Beach and a few other places in the neighborhood on the North Shore, but tend to do that with a flyrod first.

Nothing like an pretty, open beach to challenge you. I love it when fish show up and then come back around again. How fun. Wow, I think it's time to get out there, I'm ready!! Tired of being cooped up. Great points about getting better action with a loop knot and dealing with the potential line twist by using the swivel a ways back.Hope you have a great season Brian!  

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The Shimano Waxwing isn't metal. It does kill 'em when they're around. I watched bluefish hunt it down in some clear water on a boat. It was quite remarkable. Yep they're expensive and they don't cast well but the action is very good.

I had the paint come off one and it looked like metal! My bad. What is it anyway? They sure are gaining in popularity. The boat guys caught on to them first, now they are hitting the shore. I was surprised on my last trip to the Cape Cod Canal, the Wax Wings were dangling from a few rods every now and then. 

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Sure did, and he deserves kudos.  :th:

 

Having grown up in RI, doesn't bother me to see that Pt. Jude stuff either.

Thank 'ya Patchy,

 

Throwing Metal is pretty fun. I can remember when I saw somebody hucking a tin when I was a kid, then a Tyrannosaurus Rex chased us. hahaha. I'm not that old though! Seriously though, I was like, wow....look at that. How cool. He had a belt with a little pouch. That's it. Pretty sweet and pretty dirty way to do business right. 

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P.S.  Diamonds with tubes are also, IMHO, generally fished too fast and in too unbroken a retrieve. Let them bump bottom, retrieve at a reasoned pace ... My $0.02.

 

Also great to know Brian. Have you tried the little sized Diamonds much? They are really good. Slowing them down from shore makes good sense. 

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Thanks for all the work that went into OP, will be checking this out again when i'm not on a tablet.

Absolutely Luggernaut. Just trying to do my part to keep us from mutiny! It's time to get fishin!

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Great list.  Impossible to really rank or pick a favorite - it will change from night to night and over the season.

 

Two more to think about.

 

John Skinner got me using a variant of the diamond jig - a spoon jig with a tube attached when sand eels are around. More action than a diamond jig. (Terminal Tackle Company online if not in your shop.)

 

3659_255_large.jpg

 

 

 

 

Roberts Rangers.  Okay, they are a hunk of plastic and not a hunk of metal - but they cast a mile, and sink a little slower than metal would - try the bounder (1 3/4 oz.), or whistler (2 1/2 oz.) when peanut bunker are around - especially if blues are in the area. For those who never got over kindergarten art - easy to add eyes, gills, spots, stripes with a sharpie magic marker. 

 

Whistler-White-With-Red-Stripe.jpg

 

Agreed, I only ranked them to be controversial! hahaha. I was waiting for a Roberts Ranger to show up here! Hey, I put the Waxwing in this category so we have to allow the Ranger too!. Nice lure up top. Those tube tails are crazy. Bass freeking love 'em.

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