optimist

Ospreys are back !

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Confirmed the osprey sighting at Silver Spring this morning ! 

I actually took a picture of it Monday with my phone, after it took off, but it is practically over the pond at that point.  Not sure if it will show, but I will post it.

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I actually took a picture of it Monday with my phone, after it took off, but it is practically over the pond at that point.  Not sure if it will show, but I will post it.

Arg...How do i get these pics to turn?!

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hmm...aha!  The 1600x900 looks like it will work and you'll still be able to see him...though I got more pics of him in the nest this morning.

Thanks G!

post-60535-0-38276400-1490834426.jpg

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did you just assume the ospreys gender!? :mad:  :mad:

I read that the male shows up first and the female shows up a few days later.  They were right on schedule.

 

newyorkwild.com:

 

Breeding

The breeding habitats in North America are rivers, lakes, wetlands and coastal marshes. Adult male Ospreys arrive on their nesting territories a few days before the females.  This nest is in the general area of the nest from which they fledged and was built or used the year before.  Osprey will build nests on dead trees, rock outcrops, buildings, buoys, electric towers, pier pilings, and man-made platforms, i.e. almost anywhere near water. Osprey nests are a bulky mass of sticks often five feet in diameter and two to seven feet thick.  They seem to prefer nesting sites with clear visibility and an abundant food supply. Osprey seem to form loose colonies.   The number of nests in close proximity and the distance between nests seems to be determined by food abundance. Soon after his arrival at the nest, the male starts sky-dancing over the nest.  During this aerial display the male flies sharply up rapidly beating his wings and often carrying a fish or nesting material.  At a height of several hundred feet the bird hovers with tail fanned and talons dangling. He then dives down to varying distances and quickly ascends to repeat the hover several times, often uttering a creee or cheeerk call.  The sky-dance display is preformed frequently before the arrival of the female and continued less frequently after her arrival.  The sky dance seems to have two functions, a territorial display and to advertise for a mate. The return of both birds to a nest appears to be a function of territorial fidelity more than pair bonding.  The arrival of the female is followed by a period of courtship that can last for up to three weeks.  During courting the pair spends time on the nest together, as well as mate-feeding and copulating. Soon after the female’s arrival, the male starts to bring all of her food.  The female may take the food to a perch to eat, returning after her meal with material to line the nest.  Copulation may take place after the mate feeding ritual and is often preceded by a mating display by the male, female or both.  The female’s display posture has slightly drooped wings, horizontal body and tail pointed up and to one side.  The male might turn his back to the female, and spread his wings out and down with tail depressed.

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there here on the seekonk river just got here really, seeing the eagle's more...........my guess is its a late start to the season

Geezeee ya know stuff.Soone we shall call, ya'' a swampa,,,! JOKES aside brother , your seeing the way.

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