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Leuschbean

Stripers by boat

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EEEEEEEEEEEELS

 

Especially because you can play games with them, my favorites being:

 

"catch the eel wriggling around the boat"

 

"hook the eel"

 

and the perrenial classic...

 

"untangle the eel ball"

 

God they're fun.

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ok i shouldve included eels, What kind of artificial stuff (plugs, plastics, Jigs, Teasers, spinners etc.) can i use from a boat so i have something to play with while my rods in the holder

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If you can catch them for shore with "Whatever" what makes you think you can't cast & use them on a boat? -except now your casting towards the shore.

 

If your trolling ... the biggest problem with trolling "Whatever" from a boat is speed. You have to go slow then slow down some more.

 

The reason Tube & Worms work so well in a kayak is because they are ssslllloooowwww.

 

2 mph top speed trolling for stripers.

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As stated above, anything that you can use from shore you can use in your boat provided that your not in deep water.

 

For deep water I like to use bucktails and pork. You can use lima bean bucktails to get deep faster and stay there and retreive them like you do from shore. Braided lines work well with this method. I've caught many bass, blues, and fluke this way. Other jig options are to use Diamond jigs, Crippled Herring, Mega Bait, etc. Using these you drop the jig to the bottom reel up fast six or so cranks, drop it back a few feet and continue till you're almost to the top, then repeat the process. This method works best when the fish are stacked and there's more competition for food.

 

When you have a good current a very productive method is to use a light bucktail on a three way rig and drift. I also use large plastic bucktails instead of lead ones. This is how most fish is caught in the Gut and the Race.

 

Another great option is to use a fly rod with a full sinking line or tip. This is far and away the most fun and can be very productive in water less than 40 feet and slower currents, and you don't have to be an expert fly rodder to do this either. It's best to anchor and cast up current and let your fly sink to the strike zone before working the fly.

 

Since I had twins almost two years ago this is how I do the majority of my bass fishing since the bait shops are usually closed when I get back home from NYC.

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