dennysnook

Lost Striper in Florida?

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The St. John's River in Northern FL is one of the ten known spawning rivers for Striped bass. The St. J bass have been "pioneering" into the Gulf of Mexico ever since the water route from the St. Jriver across the Florida Panhandle.  I suspect that most striped bass caught on the eastern coast of Florida are St J River specific DNA. The next closest Striped bass Spawning River is the Savannah River in Northern GA.  

 

All the striped bass in the Gulf of Mexico will probably test out as St. J river dna.

 

All the West Coast of the US Pacific Striped bass can be DNA traced back to the Hudson River DNA that were transported in the 1880 and 1890's 306 in the early 80's and a larger group (1,000 to 1,300)

 in 1902 Fishermans Wharf in San Francisco weighted in 1,000,000 pounds of Striped Bass caught commercially in San Francisco Bay.

 

Pretty cool, huh!  The Hudson River DNA schoolies were netted in the Navesink River about 20 miles south of the Hudson Rivers entrance to the Atlantic Ocean. 

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Interesting somewhere south of Daytona I saw a huge truck with writing on it that proclaimed to have 12,000 gallons of hybrid striped bass on board. It was headed north on th 95 towards parts unknown yesterday.

Edited by joeg26er

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The coastal migratory stock of bass doesn't go much farther south than Cape Hatteras.

 

However, from there all the way around into Texas, there have historically been populations of striped bass endemic to local river systems, including the Santee in South Carolina (landlocked striped bass in the Santee-Cooper Reservoir there are unique among fresh water populations as having a natural origin, becoming landlocked when the dam creating the reservoir was built), the Altamaha, the St. Johns and, as some previous posters noted, other rivers emptying into the Gulf of Mexico.

 

Dams have hurt or extirpated many of the runs.  Genetic dilution from poorly-thought-out hatchery programs have harmed others.  So has bankside development, agricultural pollution, etc.  But many rivers retain remnant populations, and some, such as the St. Johns, still offer viable fisheries for native fish.

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What was the Striper at Sebastian Inlet caught on? Plug or bait?

Pretty sure it was on live shrimp. Will ask the guy for sure when I see him again, so if I don't report back it was shrimp

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If the southern range is the Carolinas then the St John's fish never migrate north. Purely endemic to that area?

Probably...there's also a Canadian population as well (Nova Scotia) which is thought to have very little migration pattern (more so up and down rivers as they spawn, but not a coastal north/south thing)....very adaptive fish

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Same thing with the native Coastal Georgia and Gulf populations. The migratory pattern is confined to the river systems and estuaries. During the warmer months they spend their time upstream in freshwater. As Winter approaches they make their way to the tidal portions of their range.   

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That's interesting. I read in the main forum about the Canadian fish but thought they still wintered in the Carolinas. Act like salmon returning to their birth place but don't appear to wonder too far.

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Such a fascinating, cool, wonderful, great Gamefish.

 

What a shame that a segment of people if left to their own devices would drive it to extinction

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Cool. I believe they ranged into the Gulf around to the Florida Pan Handle at one time.

 

I may have read that in the Nick Karas book. Somewhere else also.

 

I have that book.  He did document historic ranges that ran into Florida.

 

 

Edit...  Pulled the book from the shelf.  Not exactly the same as stripers here, and there may be more of them down there.

 

"All of Florida's striped bass, on both, Atlantic and Gulf coasts, are riverine rather than anadromous fish, and no transcoastal migrations are know to have occurred in modern times.  ...Naturally occurring populations and reproduction take place in three river systems on Florida's Atlantic Coast (St. Mary's, St. Johns, and Nassau rivers) and on the Gulf of Mexico coast in the Apalachicola river system."

 

"Occasional striped bass spawning occurs in Suwanee, Ochlockonee, Choctawhatchee, Escambia, and Blackwater rivers, also along the Gulf coast, have been verified."

 

"The most productive rivers are the St. Mary and Nassau, but the biggest fish (66lbs) came from the Apalachicola."

 

The Striped Bass  - Nick Karas, 1974

Edited by MaxKatt

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The coastal migratory stock of bass doesn't go much farther south than Cape Hatteras.

 

However, from there all the way around into Texas, there have historically been populations of striped bass endemic to local river systems, including the Santee in South Carolina (landlocked striped bass in the Santee-Cooper Reservoir there are unique among fresh water populations as having a natural origin, becoming landlocked when the dam creating the reservoir was built), the Altamaha, the St. Johns and, as some previous posters noted, other rivers emptying into the Gulf of Mexico.

 

Dams have hurt or extirpated many of the runs.  Genetic dilution from poorly-thought-out hatchery programs have harmed others.  So has bankside development, agricultural pollution, etc.  But many rivers retain remnant populations, and some, such as the St. Johns, still offer viable fisheries for native fish.

 

That's my understanding as well. Our SC stripers never (rarely) venture into open saltwater (the ocean). They're still caught close to inlets, but not much farther out than that. Their migration is up their river, not along the coast. From the limited research I've seen, each coastal river system in SC's stripers have unique DNA indicators. It would be interesting to see where this striper came from.

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That's interesting. I read in the main forum about the Canadian fish but thought they still wintered in the Carolinas. Act like salmon returning to their birth place but don't appear to wonder too far.

The Nova Scotian bass winter over in iced over lakes in Nova Scotia and return to Bay of Fundy in the spring .

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