dennysnook

Lost Striper in Florida?

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Wow, I just saw it on the report for SI. I bet the snow birds down there on the jetty were scratching their heads on that one. Snook and Striped Bass together...who would have thought?

 

Yesterday we had quite an interesting catch off the north jetty. A Striped Bass! A camera-shy angler landed the 31+" fish from the north jetty and it caused quite a stir among the locals. Many regulars who have fished the inlet for a lot of years have never seen a striper. You never know what you're going to see at the inlet! The photo is courtesy of Sally Baughman of Jackson Hole, WY. Thanks Sally!

 

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7 dorsal spines, dont sb usually  have 8 or 9?

I think you're right...that's why I'm not ruling out that maybe it's some kind of hybrid...although I'm not ready to call it a hybrid just yet

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Cool. I believe they ranged into the Gulf around to the Florida Pan Handle at one time.

 

I may have read that in the Nick Karas book. Somewhere else also.

The Gulf race of Striped Bass still exists. Unfortunately when the Jim Woodruff Dam was built(1960's) to create Lake Seminole it cut off access to the Flint River and Chattahoochee River. The native Stripers would migrate from the lower Apalachicola River drainage to the Flint and Chattahoochee every Spring. They used those two rivers as thermal refuges in Spring/Summer. Natural springs and deep pools keep the water significantly cooler than the tidal rivers and estuaries to the south(closer to the Gulf). Ideal habitat for fish trying to beat the summer heat. That region also served as a spawning ground and nursery. Some of the native Bass still manage to successfully breed and produce offspring but not many. Hatcheries help supplement the population by releasing Stripers that are at least partially genetically Gulf race. 

St. John's River in Jacksonville had them in the early 70s.

It still does as far as I know. 

Edited by kayakkrazy

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I saw some just last week that were caught on Amelia Island, which is the northernmost tip of Florida. 

Could be Stripers from the St. Johns River. The Altamaha River(SE Georgia) may also be a possible source. It has a sizable population of native Striped Bass. 

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The Gulf race of Striped Bass still exists. Unfortunately when the Jim Woodruff Dam was built(1960's) to create Lake Seminole it to cut off access to the Flint River and Chattahoochee River. The native Stripers would migrate from the lower Apalachicola River drainage to the Flint and Chattahoochee every Spring. They used those two rivers as thermal refuges in Spring/Summer. Natural springs and deep pools keep the water significantly cooler than the tidal rivers and estuaries to the south(closer to the Gulf). Ideal habitat for fish trying to beat the summer heat. That region also served as a spawning ground and nursery. Some of the native Bass still manage to successfully breed and produce offspring but not many. Hatcheries help supplement the population by releasing Stripers that are at least partially genetically Gulf race. 

It still does as far as I know. 

:howdy:

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St. John's River in Jacksonville had them in the early 70s.

 

That's what I was about to type, although i didn't have a time frame.  I've never fished the St. Johns, only read a handful of accounts stating that it has (had?) a striper fishery.  I think I saw someone targeting them on one of the 90's TV shows, but could be mistaken.

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The Gulf race of Striped Bass still exists. Unfortunately when the Jim Woodruff Dam was built(1960's) to create Lake Seminole it cut off access to the Flint River and Chattahoochee River. The native Stripers would migrate from the lower Apalachicola River drainage to the Flint and Chattahoochee every Spring. They used those two rivers as thermal refuges in Spring/Summer. Natural springs and deep pools keep the water significantly cooler than the tidal rivers and estuaries to the south(closer to the Gulf). Ideal habitat for fish trying to beat the summer heat. That region also served as a spawning ground and nursery. Some of the native Bass still manage to successfully breed and produce offspring but not many. Hatcheries help supplement the population by releasing Stripers that are at least partially genetically Gulf race. 

It still does as far as I know. 

 

Awesome!

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Yup, there are still a few native gulf striped bass.  They mostly live in the rivers that drain into lake pontchartrain, at least in Louisiana. This is the time they are usually caught.  I understand they need to find place in the river with natural springs to keep cool most of the year.

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Could be Stripers from the St. Johns River. The Altamaha River(SE Georgia) may also be a possible source. It has a sizable population of native Striped Bass. 

I'm not 100% sure about the geography down here yet, but these guys were unloading in St. Mary's Georgia, but had been fishing in the body of water from where I could see the Fernandina power plant.  Me, I fish on Summer Beach where I've been catching whiting and the occasional bonnet head shark.  I'm waiting for the real fish to come in before I head back north the second week on April.   The water is getting warmer every week, so maybe there's hope. 

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In the 1960's we would catch stripers in the Saint Simons Island area of S.E. Georgia.    The Altamaha river delta was a great place.  My Uncle caught a 44 pound female: He was trolling a big Creek Chub Pikie in the brackish water near Darien.  They were in the Crooked River and the ST. Marys river also.

 

We would catch them over the oyster bars, drifting live shrimp under a slip float.   Red drum on one drift, striper on another.   Those were the real "good old days".

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Here's a pic of the UK striper....it was only 2 1/2 lbs and for the most part, looks like any other striper....except it eye seems strange...maybe bigger than normal (proportionally)???

fish knew he someone 's going to take a picture

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