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JaseB

*srsly important question for the gear heads

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In my first round of plowing with my 2003 Honda Foreman it developed a very loud valve slap.  Seems to be running ok. Maybe a 10-20% reduction in power, but that could easily be in my head and with the weight of plow, etc.

 

If I spend 6 hours pulling all the cowling off and then adjusting valves (if possible and assuming it would fix it) snow would already be too deep for me to push.  

 

Question: Am I going to do irreparable damage if I just dog it out and keep on plowing?   For reference, live at the end of a 2 mile gravel road in the mountains, driveway is 1/3+ mile long and STEEP.   If it gets away from me it's going to take something with tracks to clear it.  It might be 4+ days until I could find someone to get up here.   Have a 5 and 7 year at home and want to make sure if we have an emergency, broken bone sledding, etc.  I can get out. 

 

The value is about $2,500 give or take, thinking about just keeping on, but wanted to get any input. 

 

Thank you,

 

JB

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Can you park a car near the end(street) of driveway now while there's little snow . You can always walk to it in an emergency and gt to where you need to go

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This vvvvvvvvvvvvvvv is good advice.

 

Can you park a car near the end(street) of driveway now while there's little snow . You can always walk to it in an emergency and gt to where you need to go

Those Honda's are tough. Let me ask a question. What viscosity oil ya running? I know this may sound a little crazy....but think about it. If you're running the recommended viscosity it may be too thick for what you're doing. You're pushing snow. Extreme cold. Is the temp gauge running where it usually runs? Or is it running a little colder than normal? If it's running cold than the oil may be like molasses and not lubricating the top end.

 

Flip side of that coin. Is it running hot? If the undercarriage is getting packed with snow, or the fans getting impacted with snow, it may be running hot. Which in turn would thin the oil to the point the lifters are collapsing.

 

Seems to me, IIRC, that's a timing belt engine. Non-interference. If the belt has jumped a tooth, it's very possible you could get some spark knock/ valve noise/ loss of power.

 

My first question at this point though would be when do you hear the valve noise? Under acceleration? Sitting at an idle? Constant? Come and go? Answer these for me and I can make an educated guess. Cold start? Hot?

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Googled the valve adjustment for the foreman and it doesnt look that difficult but I did not see a time frame mentioned. You're sure its 6 hours ?

 

2mcfisher has a point about the oil. Check the level and condition of the oil first.

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The noise could mean a keeper fell off and your valve is slapping your piston. If and when the valve gets swallowed it will do catastrophic damage. Most likely rendering your quad useless. I would have been balls deep in that engine within minutes of when that noise appeared. If you run it chances are it's toast. The longer you run it the more potential damage you are doing. This is horrible timing. My crystal ball can not predict the future this time. May run for ever with the noise. Could quit after 5 minutes. 

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The noise could mean a keeper fell off and your valve is slapping your piston. If and when the valve gets swallowed it will do catastrophic damage. Most likely rendering your quad useless. I would have been balls deep in that engine within minutes of when that noise appeared. If you run it chances are it's toast. The longer you run it the more potential damage you are doing. This is horrible timing. My crystal ball can not predict the future this time. May run for ever with the noise. Could quit after 5 minutes. 

If a keeper had fell off he wouldn't have made it another 10 ft. Just as soon as the piston did a downstroke the valve would fall down, maybe all the way out, causing catastrophic damage when the piston came back up.

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The valves do not run in a vertical line with the piston. They have an offset travel. A keeper falls off the piston cannot drive it straight back up...crunch crunch kaput.

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