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Southcoastphil

Question on sealing beat up plugs

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Greetings all.

 

As a woodworker, I mix up all sorts of concoctions for finishing all types of projects, including refinishing tables and furniture. These are often some combo of pure mineral spits, varnish and BLO, as a function of the task at hand.

 

I have a number of pretty beat up wooden plugs, which I want to seal to prevent water logging. 

 

Note that (at risk of being publicly tarred and feathered here!) I'm not looking to repaint most of these plugs, just to seal them against water ingress.  (There are, however, a few plugs that I will want to completely strip, seal, primer, colors, and clear coat.)

 

Is there any reason that I couldn't use a thin mix to soak into the wood and waterproof it?  I'm thinking spar for the varnish component, since its less brittle/more flexible than traditional varnishes, which means that I could use latex rattle can paint for the few plugs that I intend to repaint.

 

I envision a thorough cleaning of the plug, gently scraping off any flaking paint, a wipe with a little bit of MS, warm up the plug in a low oven, then apply the "medicine" with a brush, prolly doing a couple of coats.

 

Looking forward to your thoughts.

 

TIA, as always, for your help.

 

Phil

 

 

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what i do is just use the left over epoxy from each batch I spin. I just brush it on my beat up plugs in all the areas that are beat from hooks and rocks. I don't paint them just brush on a light coat and hang them scars and all. I might do a few coats if real bad hook rash. Works great .

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what i do is just use the left over epoxy from each batch I spin. I just brush it on my beat up plugs in all the areas that are beat from hooks and rocks. I don't paint them just brush on a light coat and hang them scars and all. I might do a few coats if real bad hook rash. Works great .

that how i do it too

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Same-ish here. If I ain't doing a total re-paint, I'll flake off loose paint, maybe a light spot-sand (but remove dust) and hit the beat up areas with an epoxy coat. Later, I'll re-coat the entire plug with epoxy.

 

The hook-rashed or beat up spots need to be very clean and dry, in my experience...or epoxy may not fill voids and adhere well. Really, the whole plug needs to be clean and dry, or you might be wasting your time.

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I'm trying to touch up / re-seal some old as well. I've used some West Systems type epoxies on boats and syringe type 2-parts to seal red fins after loading, etc. But could someone steer me towards some specific brands or types of epoxies you guys use for wood plugs. And are there colored epoxies or can it be added into the mix? Or epoxy it, then paint it after? 

 

Please forgive my ignorance and thanks in advance for any info.

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I'm trying to touch up / re-seal some old as well. I've used some West Systems type epoxies on boats and syringe type 2-parts to seal red fins after loading, etc. But could someone steer me towards some specific brands or types of epoxies you guys use for wood plugs. And are there colored epoxies or can it be added into the mix? Or epoxy it, then paint it after? 

 

Please forgive my ignorance and thanks in advance for any info.

I found some answers for myself after searching the threads more thoroughly.

 

Sounds like Etex, System 3, Bob Smith, Devcon and Liquid Fusion, Hard as Nails are some of the products being used for sealing or touching up lure bodies - and I'll do some reading on the different products / techinques.

 

I'm obviously not experienced with the paints / finishes side of lure craft (or any of it really), but would like to learn, so if anybody can point me towards good tutorials or specific threads that cover this stuff  it'd be a help.

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I'm still wondering, per my initial post, why I wouldn't want to first seal the wood with some mix (multiple coats) of BLO, varnish and MS, thinned to allow for max penetration INTO the wood, followed by primer, paint, and protective topcoats like the epoxies I see mentioned above and elsewhere.  

 

It seems (well to me) like use of a *penetrating* sealer would offer better resistance to water absorption than having that barrier to water absorption in the topmost level of the various finishes, for the latter can be immediately compromised with a couple of whacks from anything from hooks to teeth to rocks.

 

Has anyone tested this?

 

I recognize that I am a complete NOOB when it comes to working on wooden plugs, and that I sincerely appreciate all of the advice, insights and ideas shared by all of you savvy plug makers. 

 

My hypotheses are based on my experience with finishing and refinishing wood, both for myself and for my customers.

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Ok when I read your post initially I thought you were just asking about resealing.

There have been some tests done but the ones I'm thinking of we're done with an array of sealers applied from bare wood. I can't remember which sealer got the high ratings but most if not all, do a seal coat of some sort after all drilling and sanding on bare wood. I lately have been soaking in spar thinned with mineral spirits.

Now when you are just recoating a beat up plug with a topcoat of some sort, I would try some soaked in a sealer and then top coated and some with just the topcoat. See how it goes. You may be looking at adhesion and flaking issues with the soaking method. Not sure.

Myself, I think on the ones you are just wanting to reseal , I would just do that and not soak them. Initially there was most likely a bare wood seal step done on them.

I hope I understood your question. Good luck

Edited by wvbud22

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Howdy, Granite,

 

Is that as in Granite State?

 

Please, no worries at all about hijacking.  I found your questions and comments to be spot on.  There are so many savvy folks here willing to help that its amazing. All good, OK?

 

WVbud,

 

A mountaineer?! 

 

Perhaps I was indeed unclear in my initial post. 

 

Some used plugs I just want to seal against water ingress, because the rest of the finish (paint plus top/clear coat of whatever material) looks pretty much ok.  For those, I'll select some sort of epoxy I guess, based on the great responses I've seen here (meaning both to this thread and on SOL in general). 

 

For some of the other (as in "beat to H3LL") plugs, I'll strip them first, then apply some magic mix or soak them in it prior to applying primer, paint, sealer.

 

You left me hanging buddy, with your unfinished (oh, sheet, bad pun) comment:

"I lately have been soaking in spar thinned with"

Pure MS?  MS and BLO?    Other?

 

SCP

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I did an edit. I forgot what I was thinning with and had to go look. It's mineral spirits.

I haven't had much luck with the recoats mostly because I don't put the time in to scuff them. I just put the hard as nails on mostly to get them back in the water. The ones I recoated with epoxy peeled off in layers. Should take time to do it right. I now have a larger Arsenal and may try some more this year.

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Mountaineer,

 

Makes sense to me.

 

I have enough old plugs (recently acquired) that I can leave a bunch of them out of rotation and use them for testing purposes.  I'll research the various woods used, then test my mad scientist stuff on some dowels or scraps of those species.  

 

As for the "touch up" sealing, I plan to treat them the same as i do any other refinishing/blending job. 

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