beret

Deep Diving Metal Lip Swimmers

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46 posts in this topic

4 hours ago, sauerkraut said:

This is a great post.  But, many of the fish/catch pictures illustrate a pet peeve of mine.  

IMO:  I really hate pulling in a bass sideways-- with the 2nd treble caught in the eye socket, side around the pectoral fin, or under the gill plate opening.  My favorite way of rigging is removing all hooking beyond a single front treble.  And I supersize this single treble.  I even do this with Dinner Catcher length needlefish.

 

 

To each his own.

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6 hours ago, Bill Couch said:

To each his own.

Mr. Couch,maker of the CCW[concealed carry weapon],,,,do you like to use your deep swimmers slow rolled against the current like I do?

HH

Edited by Heavy Hooksetter

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15 hours ago, Bill Couch said:

I make some that get down to 15ft. Great in heavy current and boat plugging. Yes correct wood selection and weight placement are critical in a good deep diver.

 

20190407_202146.jpg

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20190602_152758.jpg

 

 

Always loved you're work Bill, these look like they'd murder off a large inlet jetty.

 

 

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4 hours ago, Heavy Hooksetter said:

Mr. Couch,maker of the CCW[concealed carry weapon],,,,do you like to use your deep swimmers slow rolled against the current like I do?

HH

I like to do many things with them. These DP3'S (deep plug size 3) can be swam slowly in calm water near the surface or cranked down to 15ft. They have a tight wiggle when retrieving fast or in current. If casting near deep structure they dig in on the first crank so you instantly get life throughout the whole cast.

Last spring in a boat we lost our electronics so we were fishing blind and could only look for surface action. We trolled these and some of my Giant Jointeds and when we got bit we stopped and casted to fish. 

My Giant Jointeds easily reach 12ft also.

 

IMG_2785.jpg

20190417_202329.jpg

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10 hours ago, Bill Couch said:

I like to do many things with them. These DP3'S (deep plug size 3) can be swam slowly in calm water near the surface or cranked down to 15ft. They have a tight wiggle when retrieving fast or in current. If casting near deep structure they dig in on the first crank so you instantly get life throughout the whole cast.

Last spring in a boat we lost our electronics so we were fishing blind and could only look for surface action. We trolled these and some of my Giant Jointeds and when we got bit we stopped and casted to fish. 

My Giant Jointeds easily reach 12ft also.

 

IMG_2785.jpg

20190417_202329.jpg

good work M8,,nice action and shots.

HH

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On 9/19/2019 at 11:14 AM, sauerkraut said:

This is a great post.  But, many of the fish/catch pictures illustrate a pet peeve of mine.  

IMO:  I really hate pulling in a bass sideways-- with the 2nd treble caught in the eye socket, side around the pectoral fin, or under the gill plate opening.  My favorite way of rigging is removing all hooking beyond a single front treble.  And I supersize this single treble.  I even do this with Dinner Catcher length needlefish.

 

 

Agreed. Metal Lips always seem to beat the **** out of the fish. Fish hooked in the same way we see in those photos are one of the biggest contributers to high mortality rate. Its on the fisherman to find a way to make these plugs more fish friendly. A single, large trebble and tail flag is a must here. 

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6 mins ago, jsbergen said:

Agreed. Metal Lips always seem to beat the **** out of the fish. Fish hooked in the same way we see in those photos are one of the biggest contributers to high mortality rate. Its on the fisherman to find a way to make these plugs more fish friendly. A single, large trebble and tail flag is a must here. 

this is very false. Not one of the pictures in this thread shows a fish that is hooked bad enough to kill it or rough it up. I would venture to say that ML and Deep Diving ML are the least contributing factor to fish mortality.

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On 9/19/2019 at 10:36 AM, Bill Couch said:

I make some that get down to 15ft. Great in heavy current and boat plugging. Yes correct wood selection and weight placement are critical in a good deep diver.

 

20190407_202146.jpg

imagejpeg_0(14).jpg

Very nice Bill

I'm guessing, correct me if I'm wrong, the plugs that reach depth oh 15' are shown and are your deep diving trollers

Lou

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On 9/20/2019 at 2:50 AM, Bill Couch said:

I like to do many things with them. These DP3'S (deep plug size 3) can be swam slowly in calm water near the surface or cranked down to 15ft. They have a tight wiggle when retrieving fast or in current. If casting near deep structure they dig in on the first crank so you instantly get life throughout the whole cast.

Last spring in a boat we lost our electronics so we were fishing blind and could only look for surface action. We trolled these and some of my Giant Jointeds and when we got bit we stopped and casted to fish. 

My Giant Jointeds easily reach 12ft also.

 

IMG_2785.jpg

20190417_202329.jpg

It appears you answered my question already. Just had to read on.

 

Once again, very nice Bill

Lou T 

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On 9/19/2019 at 10:16 PM, Heavy Hooksetter said:

Mr. Couch,maker of the CCW[concealed carry weapon],,,,do you like to use your deep swimmers slow rolled against the current like I do?

HH

 

My buddies and I fish bills jointed deep Diver quite a bit, it’s usually what’s first clipped on to my heavy musky rod when I head out in the boat. I think it’s either the DP2 or 3.  Usually if we’re fishing deep flats I’ll take a couple quick cranks to get it down then retrieve with a couple slow cranks to swim it then a really hard sweep while also speeding up on the reel with a quick pause.  I’ve found fish usually hit it on the sweep/pause rather than the slow roll.  My biggest fish this fall came in at 31 lbs early in September while I was burning it in as fast as I could before resetting my drift. 

 

These things flat out catch, and they craftsmanship is top notch.  You can bounce these things off rocks and they keep on going.

 

 

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57712A67-D3D1-4419-97B0-F63613FB26AD.jpeg

2C4260CE-191B-4E86-8EF4-01445E361257.jpeg

Edited by bbfish

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On 9/20/2019 at 2:14 AM, DeepBlue85 said:

 

 

Always loved you're work Bill, these look like they'd murder off a large inlet jetty.

 

 

I found these real effective this spring too. Found myself grabbing the DP2 or 3 before a conrad. Fishing outgoing water at the end of a deep inlet, they accounted for a couple nice fish.

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6 hours ago, bbfish said:

 

My buddies and I fish bills jointed deep Diver quite a bit, it’s usually what’s first clipped on to my heavy musky rod when I head out in the boat. I think it’s either the DP2 or 3.  Usually if we’re fishing deep flats I’ll take a couple quick cranks to get it down then retrieve with a couple slow cranks to swim it then a really hard sweep while also speeding up on the reel with a quick pause.  I’ve found fish usually hit it on the sweep/pause rather than the slow roll.  My biggest fish this fall came in at 31 lbs early in September while I was burning it in as fast as I could before resetting my drift. 

 

These things flat out catch, and they craftsmanship is top notch.  You can bounce these things off rocks and they keep on going.

 

 

38C71AD8-A623-4BD3-B0C3-940A56F4771C.jpeg

57712A67-D3D1-4419-97B0-F63613FB26AD.jpeg

2C4260CE-191B-4E86-8EF4-01445E361257.jpeg

yeaah,fine plug,fine fish!

HH

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12 hours ago, jsbergen said:

Agreed. Metal Lips always seem to beat the **** out of the fish. Fish hooked in the same way we see in those photos are one of the biggest contributers to high mortality rate. Its on the fisherman to find a way to make these plugs more fish friendly. A single, large trebble and tail flag is a must here. 

Check your pms

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13 hours ago, DragonsLax48 said:

this is very false. Not one of the pictures in this thread shows a fish that is hooked bad enough to kill it or rough it up. I would venture to say that ML and Deep Diving ML are the least contributing factor to fish mortality.

Are we even looking at the same pics? 1st pic has a treble embedded in the fish’s eye....2nd pic take a look at that back treble, while it might not kill that fish it sure as hell did some dame. 3rd pic one more head wiggle and that treble is also embedded in the bass eye like the above and many many others I’ve seen. 

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8ABDB6AB-4C2B-4098-99F8-BBA98D141B87.png

BEDB2ED2-4E37-4B7E-8949-F14006570595.png

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11 hours ago, jsbergen said:

Are we even looking at the same pics? 1st pic has a treble embedded in the fish’s eye....2nd pic take a look at that back treble, while it might not kill that fish it sure as hell did some dame. 3rd pic one more head wiggle and that treble is also embedded in the bass eye like the above and many many others I’ve seen. 

If you're afraid of hurting the fish with your sharp hooks than you have the power to take them off and fish hookless, but dont try and tell me that these big plugs are the driving factor in high mortality rates. High mortality is cause by improper fish handling and gut hooked fish. Gut hooked fish are not common with big plugs (but always a possibility when fishing)

 

I hope you see my point. Im not going to argue more than this. This was an awesome thread. Lets get back on topic.

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