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Scrubby

Couple of questions about bucktails

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By no means do I consider myself a master of the bucktail but one thing I learned last season was to keep it light.  I live in South Jersey and many of the oldtimers on this end suggest starting with a 5/8oz and going no heavier than 3/4oz.  When I started with 5/8oz instead of 3/4oz  my success definitely improved.  

surf........how far out are you getting the buck out in the surf?  what are you using as a trailer also................ personally, i like those mister twister grub tails,  they're so supple and soft which give them superb action in the water.............thanks !

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i'm reading alot about guys using bucktails under 1 oz.........let me ask, how far are we concentraing getting that bucktail?  Understanding all the nuances of fish right "in the wash" or "at your feet", are there other areas you're concentrating in the surf when using such light bucks such as 1/2 oz??

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I put a keeper on the beach tonight with a 1/2 oz Smiling Bill chatreuse bucktail with a green twister tail, casting into a NE wind, bucktail was landing in between 2-4 feet of slop, I could keep it near the bottom, but not on the bottom. Bucktail was going maybe 20 yards, but I guess that was far enough.

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surf........how far out are you getting the buck out in the surf?  what are you using as a trailer also................ personally, i like those mister twister grub tails,  they're so supple and soft which give them superb action in the water.............thanks !

Yogiii, I should start by saying that when I fish the light bucktails I'm using a Tsunami airwave rated 5/8 to 3oz. The rod's rating on the lighter end is pretty spot on and if the wind isn't a factor I get pretty good distance.  What I've found is that distance isn't usually the issue but rather keeping the bucktail from dragging bottom especially when coming through the wash.  Depending on whether or not blues are in the area I typically rotate between Mr. Twisters and pork rinds.  I hope this helps.  

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Yogiii, I should start by saying that when I fish the light bucktails I'm using a Tsunami airwave rated 5/8 to 3oz. The rod's rating on the lighter end is pretty spot on and if the wind isn't a factor I get pretty good distance.  What I've found is that distance isn't usually the issue but rather keeping the bucktail from dragging bottom especially when coming through the wash.  Depending on whether or not blues are in the area I typically rotate between Mr. Twisters and pork rinds.  I hope this helps.

 

thanks for the reply surf..... Let me ask, what kind of yardage are you getting ?

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thanks for the reply surf..... Let me ask, what kind of yardage are you getting ?

I've found that yardage, the way and where I fish, doesn't matter. Most of my strikes are within 30 yards of the jetty/beach, with many coming as I'm getting ready to pull it out of the water. You need to get to know the terrain you're fishing and get comfortable with your technique. There are basics to casting, retrieval speed, and setup, but trial and error is the best teacher. I tell guys who are interested in learning bucktailing to take 4 or 5 setups with them, 1/2 ounce and 3/4 ounce and nothing else. I've seen several guys get frustrated, go to other lures in their bags, and basically give up on bucktailing. Once you're comfortable with it, it's a blast!

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Distance is extremely over rated with bucktails. You are better off focusing on the first troth with a light sensitive rod vs trying to get a heavy bucktail out there 100 yards and plow sand with it. It might feel silly throwing your presentation 20 yards into a big ocean, but trust me that is where you want to be. 

 

This is also assuming that you are fishing shallow open sand beaches.

 

I fished with bucktails for 2 seasons without a striped bass. Caught all the other species just no stripers. I was constantly told I should not use bucktails in the areas I fish. That I was wrong and I am limiting my self. I am glad I stuck with it because now I catch more fish on jigs then I ever have before on other lures. Also a huge plus is my gear is getting simpler every year. I bring a handful of bucktails, trailers, jig heads and some plastics. All fits in my pockets. Another huge advantage is I don't use treble hook lures and crush my barbs. Since I release all of my bass there is minimal damage to the fish. Makes it very easy on me and the fish.

 

People like nam1969 encouraged me to keep going in some of my older posts and I thank them for that.  :clap:

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One of the best parts about being a bucktail junkie is that it lets you travel light.  Really light.  I used to plod around with a tackle shop around my shoulder.  Its completely unnecessary and will tire you out much quicker if you tend to move around a lot.  

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Guys I gotta tell you, your respones have been awesome and have motivated me to learn to become a proficient bucktailer..Ive always thought that being really good at one techique is better than being half assed at a bunch of them..

 

Thank you

Edited by Scrubby

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Oh, and one other question. Alot of hair, medium hair, or very little hair? I know I like little hair or a rubber skirt when bucktailing for fluke but I hear to use a bucktail with alot of hair for stripers..

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Distance is extremely over rated with bucktails. You are better off focusing on the first troth with a light sensitive rod vs trying to get a heavy bucktail out there 100 yards and plow sand with it. It might feel silly throwing your presentation 20 yards into a big ocean, but trust me that is where you want to be. 
 
This is also assuming that you are fishing shallow open sand beaches.
 
I fished with bucktails for 2 seasons without a striped bass. Caught all the other species just no stripers. I was constantly told I should not use bucktails in the areas I fish. That I was wrong and I am limiting my self. I am glad I stuck with it because now I catch more fish on jigs then I ever have before on other lures. Also a huge plus is my gear is getting simpler every year. I bring a handful of bucktails, trailers, jig heads and some plastics. All fits in my pockets. Another huge advantage is I don't use treble hook lures and crush my barbs. Since I release all of my bass there is minimal damage to the fish. Makes it very easy on me and the fish.
 
People like nam1969 encouraged me to keep going in some of my older posts and I thank them for that.  :clap:

 

I couldn't agree with you more faithless. Plowing sand will almost always NOT get you fish.  It's just not very natural looking.  I would say that although most in this post don't like to go over 3/4oz., most of my success has been with a white 1 oz jetty caster with red pork rind.  If I feel the BT is hitting the bottom too much (more than an occasional skip), I'll go lighter, as light at 3/8oz.  As others have mentioned, I get almost all of my hits in the lip, very close to shore, so a far cast is not necessary.  I like to use lighter tackle when fishing bucktail as well (7' med rod and 4000 reel with 25lb braid).  

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