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Couple of questions about bucktails

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I have caught more stripers on accident using bucktails than I have on purpose..It seems that the bucktail is many fishermans "go to" lure from the surf..  I would really like to actually use bucktails affectively.. am I missing something? Is there a certain depth or position in the water collum I should be fishing them in? Im assuming a teaser should be used? should I tip the bucktail and teaser with bait like a stripbait or curly tail? are there certain colors for diffent times of day or night? overcast or sunny?? what style of bucktail is best? Im really just looking for the basics on bucktailing for stripers any advice would be greatly apprectated

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Bucktails are very versatile. When fishing buck tails go with as heavy as necessary, but as light as possible. To further explain, you wouldn't use one weight buck tail in every condition. For light surf or current, use lighter bucktails. Lighter bucktails also ride higher in the water column. The opposite with heavy bucktails is also true.

 

Its very common to tip them with uncle josh porkrinds for added action against or slowing the sink rate. Bare just well too.

 

Color... Some people fall into the light at day dark at night category, others stick with one color all the time, and yet some don't give a poop what color it is. Dealers choice until you make your own preference

 

For style, anything with the hook eye close to the front would be best for the surf.

 

Teasers are options. Experience and success rate vary by user. As well as time of year etc

 

For a quick fix go spend 30 minutes on John skinners you tube page. Then support the man by picking up a book.

Edited by Camren

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By no means do I consider myself a master of the bucktail but one thing I learned last season was to keep it light.  I live in South Jersey and many of the oldtimers on this end suggest starting with a 5/8oz and going no heavier than 3/4oz.  When I started with 5/8oz instead of 3/4oz  my success definitely improved.  

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I am in the same category as you are. One thing I have been doing is sharpening the hooks. Also, I have seen some fish follow but just not take it yet. I think the key is keeping it lifelike. Also, remaining confident is key from what I have experienced and read/watched (John skinner and others I believe) when fish aren't there its not going to catch. Right? So, Keep at it and keep us posted on your next bass or whatever?

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to me the hardest thing about bucktailing is learning to know when you are in the strike zone. If you are unsure slow down and bounce off the bottom until you get the cadence. Go as light as possible.

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I have been fishing bucktails for years and was fortunate to have been tutored by some of the best.

 

I fish light, with 1/2 ounce my favorite, 3/4 being the heaviest. I attach a 6 inch curly tail. I only fish white and prefer smilin bills by Andrus. Leader is 36-42" with no teaser. Teaser gives the line a whole different action which, from my experience, is a negative. The best advice I can give you is to find someone who knows what they are doing and ask for their advice. Worst that can happen is they ignore you. Most will be able to give you a few tips. 

 

50-70 percent of my bass come on bucktails. Almost every hookup is in the upper lip or jaw. Does the least amount of damage to the fish.

 

Good luck.

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most bucktails serves the same or similar purpose. I think the importance is the actual weight and water condition it's serving. You are not going to simply toss an 1/2 oz buck tail out onto big water conditions nor cast 3oz buck tail into flat ocean.

 

I noticed one thing, especially out "front" in jersey and with all these replenishments you could get away with lighter bucktail than larger profiled BT that are appropriate for inlets and faster currents.

 

Not discrediting John skinner and his methods of BT but it's not easy as he describes on his books and his videos. You definitely need to keep on Bucktailing even if you are not catching just to get sense of things. IMO

Edited by work2much

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It's all about the weight and the tail, they have to balance so the jig doesn't just drag across the sand, it has to swim.

And remember, jigs + white water = bass

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I fish bucktails from 1/4-3/4 oz with 1/2 being 75% of the time. I did better last year with pork rind trailers, this year they want curly tails. One big thing that no one ever mentions is 1/2 oz bucktail doesn't actually weight 1/2 oz. It differs for every manufacturer. I have some 1/2 oz bucktails that are closer to 3/4oz and 3/4oz bucks that are an ounce. It pays to weight them and organize accordingly. I never had a lighter than advertised weight, but always heavier.

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