Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
bido

Beach Replenishment- Environmental Catastrophy

Rate this topic

317 posts in this topic

 

SEA BRIGHT: SWIMMER DIES AFTER RESCUE

 

just_inA northern New Jersey man died late Monday, hours after he was pulled from the Atlantic Ocean off an unprotected beach in Sea Bright, **** reported Tuesday.

 

Kevin Searfoss, 18, of Rockaway, died at Monmouth Medical Center in Long Branch at 11 p.m., borough police Chief John Sorrentino told the publication.

 

 

 

From the report:

 

Searfoss was with a group of about 12 people on an unprotected stretch of beach just south of the Driftwood Cabana Club when he went swimming with another person, Sorrentino said.

 

At around 1 p.m., lifeguards from the nearby cabana club rushed over to where the beachgoers were after hearing them yelling and screaming, Sorrentino said. The beach club lifeguards then contacted Seabright lifeguards and Emergency Medical Services (EMS).

 

Lifeguards were able to pull one of the swimmers out fairly quickly, Sorrentino said. He did not need medical attention.

 

But Searfoss was submerged under water and wasn’t located by lifeguards until about 20 minutes later, Sorrentino said.

 

Sorrentino told **** that the two swimmers were pulled out to sea by a riptide.

Edited by cartopper

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

AVALON, N.J., (CBS) — Avalon has reopened a portion of the beach that was closed over the weekend after high tide carved out cliffs of sand as steep as five feet.

 

The erosion stretched down the beach from 9th to 24th Street.

 

The beach is back open, but not without the help of heavy equipment early Monday morning.

 

Chopper 3 over Avalon Monday morning shows workers re-grading the beach after weekend erosion forced beach patrol to shut down the north end beaches.

 

Marie Robb watched the erosion happen.

 

“I was out at low tide earlier then came back to the house, then went back in the afternoon,” said Robb.

 

And when she did, this is what Robb and other beachgoers saw. A five-foot drop off.

 

“It was about as tall as me,” said Robb.

 

“It’s just a, it’s a cliff, it’s just a wall of sand.”

 

The erosion stretched a mile along Avalon’s north end, exposed this pipe and quickly became the talk of the town.

 

Avalon just finished a massive beach refill project where they brought in new sand. For two days there were persistent northeasterly winds which basically came in, sent the waves crashing into the new sand, and sending it down south.

 

“Public works came out early Monday morning before the crowds started coming to the beach and took their loaders and began to knock down the beach in the form that gradual slope. So right now it’s safe, people are in the water, and it’s always safety when it comes to a day at the beach,” said Avalon spokesperson Scott Wahl.

 

How will Avalon officials get the sand back in place?

 

“Any sand that was displaced by the natural scarping from the wind will wind up on south end beaches and Avalon is progressive to the point where we do some back passing projects in the winter where we take the sand that was in the north end that washes south and mechanically relocate it back to the north end where it belongs,” said Wahl.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How will Avalon officials get the sand back in place?

 

“Any sand that was displaced by the natural scarping from the wind will wind up on south end beaches and Avalon is progressive to the point where we do some back passing projects in the winter where we take the sand that was in the north end that washes south and mechanically relocate it back to the north end where it belongs,” said Wahl.

 

How do you mechanically move sand where it belongs? Isn't where nature moves it, where it belongs? What imbeciles!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Used to be if you found bunker along the beach, your chance of

 hooking up was very high. Last handful of years seems I can move

 with schools of bunker for days with no fish under them. Lots less

 bass, lots more bunker. Hopefully all this bait will help the stock build

 quickly, but that still gives them no reason to come back onto the beach.

 Future of Jersey surf fishing seems pretty bleak to me. Shame for the young

 guys.

 

 

I agree 1000%

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm really worried that seaside park and IBSP are going to be a desert this fall. The casino pier cam makes the beach look like a beach-lip-only beach with no apparent cuts or offshore bar. During the winter I would check that can out daily and there was some nice looking structure there that didn't change much. Now it looks like Delaware beaches there. The far right pan of the camera there seems to be some light structure, but damn, I'm frickin worried.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

AVALON, N.J., (CBS) — Avalon has reopened a portion of the beach that was closed over the weekend after high tide carved out cliffs of sand as steep as five feet.

 

The erosion stretched down the beach from 9th to 24th Street.

 

The beach is back open, but not without the help of heavy equipment early Monday morning.

 

Chopper 3 over Avalon Monday morning shows workers re-grading the beach after weekend erosion forced beach patrol to shut down the north end beaches.

 

Marie Robb watched the erosion happen.

 

“I was out at low tide earlier then came back to the house, then went back in the afternoon,” said Robb.

 

And when she did, this is what Robb and other beachgoers saw. A five-foot drop off.

 

“It was about as tall as me,” said Robb.

 

“It’s just a, it’s a cliff, it’s just a wall of sand.”

 

The erosion stretched a mile along Avalon’s north end, exposed this pipe and quickly became the talk of the town.

 

Avalon just finished a massive beach refill project where they brought in new sand. For two days there were persistent northeasterly winds which basically came in, sent the waves crashing into the new sand, and sending it down south.

 

“Public works came out early Monday morning before the crowds started coming to the beach and took their loaders and began to knock down the beach in the form that gradual slope. So right now it’s safe, people are in the water, and it’s always safety when it comes to a day at the beach,” said Avalon spokesperson Scott Wahl.

 

How will Avalon officials get the sand back in place?

 

“Any sand that was displaced by the natural scarping from the wind will wind up on south end beaches and Avalon is progressive to the point where we do some back passing projects in the winter where we take the sand that was in the north end that washes south and mechanically relocate it back to the north end where it belongs,” said Wahl.

 

I fish in that area at times and saw they filled the beach up to the top of the jettys this spring.  That was 8' high.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Was in lbi yesterday at 8th street in beach haven. Could see the project, I mean disaster in action. Not only is it eight feet of sand it looks like 8ft of s#%^. Sand is a charcoal like color. With amount of sand I saw I don't see how island beach won't be affected.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last weekend, the wife and I spend two days driving along the east coast of FL looking at places to buy. Will be checking out the west coast of FL this fall. While I was there, I also (as you can imagine) took a close look at some of the fishing spots that some FL friends have told me about. Better fishing days are in my future and it is unfortunate that this state really sucks for fishing now ... both fresh and salt water.

 

Now, responding to some of the earlier comments made back in July.

 

1.Are you sure that the beach replenishment is being done simply because rich homeowners are asking for it? OR, could it possibly be because the politicians believe that the Jersey Shore is critical to our state's tourism revenue and economic growth? One would think that one goal would be to keep NJ residents taking their vacations in state vs driving down to Ocean City MD or other destinations. 

 

2. Global Warming - I can show you earth temps going back thousands of years which indicate that what we are experiencing now is just another cycle. Do cars and industry contribute? Sure, but nobody can clearly say how much.  Also, what is all of the hysteria about when it comes to warming temps? So we have a few more hurricanes. 

 

3. Rising sea levels - Are you positive that it is due to melting ice? Am I the only one who is into science? There are many more factors which CAN contribute to rising sea levels. The shifting of the earth's crust is something that has been happening since the beginning of time. It happens slowly but inches per year can make a big difference. It will displace water just like it does when there is an earthquake underwater.... it just happens a lot faster then and is much easier to see. Mountains are also growing taller every year and the ones that border water are also creating displacement. Finally, all of the underwater volcanos that are leaking lava are essentially displacing water. NONE of these things have anything to do with pollution.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OR, could it possibly be because the politicians believe that the Jersey Shore is critical to our state's tourism revenue and economic growth?

 

In Allenhurst, Loch Arbor, Deal, and Elberon where the locals do NOT want us on "their" beaches ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OR, could it possibly be because the politicians believe that the Jersey Shore is critical to our state's tourism revenue and economic growth?

 

In Allenhurst, Loch Arbor, Deal, and Elberon where the locals do NOT want us on "their" beaches ?

No doubt...the locals are doing things to keep us off. Example being those 2 hour parking limit signs in Deal. I just don't think that when you decide to do beach replenishment that it is decided on a town by town basis with all of these additional factors considered. IMO, the state decides to go with beach replenishment from Seaside north and that is what they do... period.

 

I have posted about 2 years ago that the smart thing would be to spend more money today on a series of "T" shaped jetty's. Although the initial cost is much more than pumping sand, it will last almost forever, will help retain sand and will improve the ecosystem. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No doubt...the locals are doing things to keep us off. Example being those 2 hour parking limit signs in Deal. I just don't think that when you decide to do beach replenishment that it is decided on a town by town basis with all of these additional factors considered. IMO, the state decides to go with beach replenishment from Seaside north and that is what they do... period.

 

I have posted about 2 years ago that the smart thing would be to spend more money today on a series of "T" shaped jetty's. Although the initial cost is much more than pumping sand, it will last almost forever, will help retain sand and will improve the ecosystem. 

The signs aren't always all over Deal, but any sign is B.S. even if the place is devoid of fish right now. I can't figure out when they choose to stick the pop up no parking signs on some of the streets.

Edited by Sheisty

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3. Rising sea levels - Are you positive that it is due to melting ice? Am I the only one who is into science? There are many more factors which CAN contribute to rising sea levels. The shifting of the earth's crust is something that has been happening since the beginning of time. It happens slowly but inches per year can make a big difference. It will displace water just like it does when there is an earthquake underwater.... it just happens a lot faster then and is much easier to see. Mountains are also growing taller every year and the ones that border water are also creating displacement. Finally, all of the underwater volcanos that are leaking lava are essentially displacing water. NONE of these things have anything to do with pollution.

 

 

Eric, you're not the only one who's "into science".  I have a masters in geology, career of 35 years.  Your statements about tectonic plate movement/mountain building displacing water are completely wrong.  Just for starters, look up subduction.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.