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caranx

dentex and corvina

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All right, all right, I've got the pictures, now I only hope this darn think will not play some weird trick to me and will show them to you.

 

Caranx

 

corvina.jpg

 

 

dentex.jpg

 

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Wow...it did work ! The picture with the boat full of Corvinas is from a magazine, I'm not the darn butcher there..... those fish are probably from 15 to 80lb, all of them said to be caught trolling with big plugs on downriggers.

The guy with the Dentex is me, or I should better say it was me before I changed a bit my shape thanks to the help of spanish food and beer (nothing beats the spaghetti !!!). The fish have been caught 5 years ago in the Canary Island trolling a live bait, but they will also take artificil lures. That's about a 6/7 lb fish, and the biggest of this family (Dentex dentex) can reach around 30...more or less. There's another kind along the coast of Spain which can grow a bit bigger and has a very weird forehead.

 

Thanks for your interest

 

Ciao

 

Nicola

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Caranx,

 

Thanks for the pictures, those are some mutant Weakies.wink.gif Why don't you send a couple of those over to the states to take up residence. They remind me of the strain that is caught in Australia, not sure of the name but they get huge. They say that a baby in Australia is 40# and you will be ridiculed for keeping anything smaller.wink.gif

 

------------------

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Dubs a.k.a., Charlie

dubs@stripersonline.com

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Dubs... it is the Mulloway, a big fish related to your weakfish.

 

Caranx...Perhaps the biggest of all weakfishes (Corvinas) is the Mexican Totuava. The fishery is unfortunatelly in bad shape, because of a combination of damming the Colorado river and over fishing.

 

Gill netting is bad, there is no doubt, but I have discussed this with several fisheries managers and ichthyologysts and they think that this species is dependent on the fresh water that used to flow into the delta.

 

See petition

http://www.bajadestinations.com/totuava/totuapet.htm

 

There is an aquaculture project to raise juvenile totoava, but unless they tear down the dams, I am not sure if it will work.

 

If interested this is a good article on this gigantic corvina:

http://www.bajadestinations.com/afis...fish000101.htm

 

 

Sergio

 

 

 

[This message has been edited by Sergio (edited 07-13-2001).]

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Sergio, when I saw that pic, before reading the text, I thought that they were Totuava. The 2 on the left look like WSB. Can't wait to get back to Baja.

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Hi JonS... I can not wait also to go again where I got the 38 lb WSB last September.

I am waiting a report from a friend of mine that is researching that area for a magazine article.

In the last days several LARGE snook have been caught in San José in Los Cabos. A confirmed 46.6 lbs (pending world record for the White species) and another one about 60 lbs that was not weighted were caught.

I will join in Los Cabos an American friend in early October, maybe we could meet there and make a small fling. You know it is not the best time for roosters, but we could find many other fish.

Take care.

Sergio

 

 

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Ray Cannon's book tells about the Totuava and it is a real pity to see what happened to those fishes, I hope that the comeback they're talking about is for real. Well our Corvina doesn't grow that big but still is a very large fish, unfortunately looks like our commercial fishermen are trying to follow the mexican example step by step not only harvesting a lot of big ones, but also collecting the small fish, for whom they just found a new market in the restaurants, were they sell it like Corvinata.....

As far as Spain you can only find them in certain areas, in the south of the country, Atlantic side, where there is a constant flow of freshwater. They have almost been erased from the gulf of Biscay, Mauritania, Morocco and are more and more scarce in western Africa...somebody's doing a good job here !!!

 

Ciao

 

Caranx

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