Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
nosajwp

Patterns with exposed shanks...

Rate this topic

17 posts in this topic

Why is it that most tarpon flies are tied such that all the material is at the bend of the hook and most of the shank is exposed? I often wonder why more saltwater baitfish patterns aren't tied like this and why most tarpon patterns are tied like this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is an excellent question, one of which I do not have an answer to.

 

 

I know some style flies are tied for a practical purpose, such as weedless patterns but with tarpon flies I wonder if the style is more of a traditional pattern that just goes back in time like some of the Salmon flies and how they where tied using Black hooks with up turned eyes and multi colors.

 

Hopefully some of the Tarpon guru's will educate us.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is just my opinion but it makes sense at least to me. The tarpon style flies were tied at the bend of the hook to prevent fouling around the hook because you would probably only get one shot at a fish and didn't want it ruined by a fouled fly. I have used the tarpon style of tying for stripers and blues with some success. Especially with blues the fact that the fly is at the bend offers some protection to the tippet from their teeth. As I said this is just my $.02. Ron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah I always thought they were tied like that to protect the tippet, like a built in mini bite guard against their hard mouths


some pike flies are tied that way


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Aaaahh, BobPop's explanation has a ring of plausibility there. I bet that's it. Given the fussiness of presentation that tarpon sometimes require, it's at least plausible. Tarpon have notoriously hard mouths, and a snell give a more direct line of pull when you try to set the hook then a knot would do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It makes it easier to balance smaller profiles on bigger hooks. A 2/0 striper fly might be 6-7" long, while most 2/0 tarpon flies are just over 2". If there were more short/wide gap hooks back In the day, traditional tarpon flies would look very different.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have tied many of the surf flies I use on the beaches in florida that way. Many years ago I was in a fly shop in Naples Fl and watched the shops owner tie several, an all white feather



baitfish pattern. I believe and could be wrong but I thought the original Gibby pattern was tied the same way, size 4 hook to a 1/0. I bought several and had great success, it is my go to fly for down there. I have also used the concept/design on a few flies for bluefish as well, which I think as mentioned  the exposed shank can act as a bite guard. Caught blues with them but then again when they are hungary they will chomp at anything.


The design also works better,IMHO, on spanish macs, they readily take the fly with fewer fish lost because they hit the back end of the fly keeping the leader just beyond the their teeth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fly Time, when I first started fishing in Florida I did not know a lot about Snook or what flies to use and with that the term "Ignorance is Bliss" does not apply. I did a little research and it seemed the two flies I found mentioned a lot was the Schminnow and the Gibby DT Special. I made these Gibby's up using what materials I had lying around the house. At the time I did not have any white hackle but these worked very well also.

 

1843215

 

After reading all the replies, if I put them all together, it all makes sense, The lack of wide gap hooks in early times required the use of bigger hooks for smaller profile flies and tied to prevent fouling, with the ability to Snell the fly to the leader to get a straight tracking retrieve which I have heard and read is critical to enticing a tarpon to hit the fly and of coarse have the hook shank serve as a bite.guard. All these combined seem to nail it in my mind.

 

I am sitting here typing this after reading the reply's while I wait for my car to be serviced because , it seems Jiffy Lube did a bogus job on my oil change and did not screw the oil filter in properly and all the oil blew out of the engine. Fortunately no damage to the car.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good to hear your car is OK, doing something fast is not always good!


Those are the flies, great pattern. Easy to tie and they catch fish. Before I head down to Fla when I can I always tie up some Schminnows and Gibby DT Specials to take with me. Can't leave home without it, or them!


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For those anglers whose fishing requires the fly be snelled, as opposed to knotted to a tippet, what snell do you use? I know there are several snell knots - there's an oxymoron for you - but haven't bothered to do more than a very simple snell that I like for blackfish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
For those anglers whose fishing requires the fly be snelled, as opposed to knotted to a tippet, what snell do you use? I know there are several snell knots - there's an oxymoron for you - but haven't bothered to do more than a very simple snell that I like for blackfish.

 

 

Unless your hook has an upturned eye, a snell will make your fly track funny, possibly even spin.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
For those anglers whose fishing requires the fly be snelled, as opposed to knotted to a tippet, what snell do you use? I know there are several snell knots - there's an oxymoron for you - but haven't bothered to do more than a very simple snell that I like for blackfish.

 

The basic snell knot is the same as a nail knot tied around the shank behind the eye, it requires an up or down turned eye or else the leader will exit the eye out of line with hook shank. I've never heard of anyone using a snell on a fly since the days of gut, but of course I could be uninformed. :-)

JC

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Aaaahh, BobPop's explanation has a ring of plausibility there. I bet that's it. Given the fussiness of presentation that tarpon sometimes require, it's at least plausible. Tarpon have notoriously hard mouths, and a snell give a more direct line of pull when you try to set the hook then a knot would do.

 

I had to go back through this thread to figure out where the snell question came up, I think in the fifties- sixties the mono they were using was so stiff and hard that a regular knot through the eye was too bulky and probably not very strong so they resorted to snelling, most likely in advance using hot water to soften the material. Don't know how they would attach the bite tippet to the leader though.

JC

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.