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Gourmet Coffee Maker Recomendation

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Guys :

 

Can anyone reccomend an automatic Cofee Maker that makes Really GOOD coffee...smooth enough to drink Black?? Time and Time again??

 

 

 

I have been brewing coffee using an old Melitta Cone Pour over Manual Pot for over 30 years.

 

A few weeks ago I got a Bug up My Arse and looked into an automatic cofee maker....

 

So...First I bought A Melitta Automatic Coffee maker...Its a brand I trust.

 

IT MADE BITTER UNDRINKABLE COFFEE!!! E-Mailed the Manufacturer......(Hamilton Beach...Dead Air...) So back to BB&B it went....

 

 

 

So Now I invest in a Bonavita 1800TH.....Got great reviews...

 

1s pot of Coffee...The Carafee Explodes...coffee everywhere,,,,

 

5 days later I get a replacement Carafee...from Bonavita that is all Stainless...so Far so good Yes???

 

After multiple Pots, Brands styles of coffee......Fresh Ground Beans, Golden Ratio of Cofee to water ect...Tried less Cofee, more cofee....Different grinds...

 

This Cofee Maker Makes a Brew SO SOUR...like someone dumped a spoon full of Lemon Juice into your morning cup....Still cant get the after taste out of my mouth!

 

So after work this ones going back to BB&B.

 

 

 

So as of tomorrow I am back to old reliable....Melitta Cone...water Just off the boil.....3 ice cubes added to the tea kettle to get to 200 degF...Bloom the cofee....Then pour over like I have been for 30+ years.

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That's a particular taste from real drip that's going to be hard to replicate in a machine. Personally, I use a DeLonghi espresso machine. If I do make regular coffee I use a French Press.

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It's all what you're used to. I've been drinking perked coffee forever, can't really stand drip coffee now. Can get by with some of the stronger roasts from a Keurig.


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I did some screwing around a while ago, and I came to the conclusion that the coffee maker mattered way less than grinding your beans right before you brew coffee. We have a burr mill grinder and a middle-of-the-road coffeemaker (a Cuisinart DCC-1200) that cost about $80, and the coffee that comes out of that thing is great -- and I, too, drink coffee black.

 

Get a grinder, a decent coffeemaker, and get good whole beans, and you'll be set.

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I did some screwing around a while ago, and I came to the conclusion that the coffee maker mattered way less than grinding your beans right before you brew coffee. We have a burr mill grinder and a middle-of-the-road coffeemaker (a Cuisinart DCC-1200) that cost about $80, and the coffee that comes out of that thing is great -- and I, too, drink coffee black.

 

Get a grinder, a decent coffeemaker, and get good whole beans, and you'll be set.

 

Well...so far I got 2 out of 3.

 

Ground beans fresh this AM (A&P 8 O'Clock, Medium Roast, Whole Bean, 100% Arabica). Golden Ratio of 9 grams cofee per 5 Oz Cup. Uniform Grind on the coarse side....Cofee Crossed my Eyes it was so SOUR!

 

What Cofee Beans are U using?? And what Ratio of Cofee to Water?? Also what Grind?? I was Told by BonaVita it should look like Coarse ground Black Pepper.

 

The Bona Vita has to go back!! I was already ticked off when the carafee exploded! So not making good coffee has no wiggle room.

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That's a particular taste from real drip that's going to be hard to replicate in a machine. Personally, I use a DeLonghi espresso machine. If I do make regular coffee I use a French Press.

 

Hi Mike

 

So here I am ready to bring home a hand held refractometer to determine% Dissolved Solids, and a Set of Rotap Screens to get the right partical size distribution....Like that Gail Beneger guy on Breaking Bad. Cant make a smooth cup with these gadgets to save my life!

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You're problem is the 8 o clock coffee and not the coffee maker. Buying the right beans and grinding them makes a huge difference.

 

I get my beans from Trader Joes. I tried 8 o clock some years ago in my french press and it tasted just like you're describing- sour.

 

I used to subscribe to Tonx.org and they would deliver different beans to my door. I'm not sure if they even do that anymore but it was good until i stopped paying for it. I enjoy trying different beans. I would not recommend the 8 o clock brand.

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What Cofee Beans are U using??

 

You're problem is the 8 o clock coffee and not the coffee maker. Buying the right beans and grinding them makes a huge difference.

 

I get French Roast beans from Old City Coffee at the Reading Terminal Market here in Philly. They're pricey ($13.75 a pound), but when A) you only have to buy a pound once every 3 weeks or so, and B) you consider how much you spend on one freaking coffee at a Dunkin Donuts, it's an extravagance that is not that big a deal.

 

The biggest factor in coffee, for me, anyway, is freshness: you wanna get yer beans as soon as possible after they leave the roaster. This means you should look for a place that does volume, that sells a lotta coffee -- a place that roasts beans every day (like Old City Coffee does) is gonna give you way fresher beans than a general store like a supermarket. Avoid any place where buying beans that were roasted a month ago is a possibility.

 

Which coffee brand you pick, or which store you go to, matters less than getting them fresh. Find a good local source, and you'll be set.

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IT MADE BITTER UNDRINKABLE COFFEE!!! E-Mailed the Manufacturer......(Hamilton Beach...Dead Air...) So back to BB&B it went....

 

 

It's not the machine - it's the coffee - You can't make good coffee, without good coffee

Saw a show where they did a taste test on coffee and it was shown that a half dozen "quakers" in a pound can ruin the taste of the entire pound.

Quakers are those beans that weren't fully roasted and have whitish colored spots in the seam.

 

As for the coffee maker, I chucked or sold all of my machines, even the high end one, and have gone back to the oldest way to make coffee that there is. (plus I gain valuable counter space, those machines are huge)

 

1826089

 

This is just a simplified french press method - coffee is made and comes out the same exact way, the grounds are just strained differently.

One morning I broke my third French press on the granite, they tend to be delicate. Was desperate for a cup of joe so came up with this.

 

16 oz of water to a boil, turn off, add two scoops of coffee, give a stir, let it sit for up to 5 minutes depending on how strong you like it.

Strain though the cone - I use the reusable gold cone filter because now filters are one less thing to run out of.

Best coffee I've ever made. I think it's because the grounds have a chance to really steep in the water, rather than only touch it briefly.

 

Couldn't remember the term for "quaker" so had to look it up, found this:

 

Coffee Terms - Bean Defects

 

Antestia

Damage from the Antestia bug, resulting in coffee beans ranging from slightly discolored to almost entirely black and shriveled up.

 

Bits

Pieces of coffee beans crushed during processing.

 

Black Beans

Black, or very dark, unroasted beans. Black beans typically result from harvesting immature cherries or by harvesting dead cherries that fall naturally from the tree. Black beans can also result from exposure to water and heat and insect-damage. Unroasted coffee beans with more than 25% black, deep blue, or dark brown surface area, may be considered black beans. Black beans have a detrimental effect on coffee taste. The number of black beans in a representative sample is a basic measure of coffee grade.

 

Blotchy

Irregular greenish, whitish or yellowish patches on unroasted coffee beans. Blotchy beans may result from incomplete or uneven drying during processing.

 

Boat Shaped

Beans with ends that curve upwards like a boat.

 

Bullhead

An extra large coffee bean. Sometimes a peaberry which has not totally grown together.

 

CBB Damaged

Coffee Berry Borer damaged coffee beans. The Coffee Berry Borer, or Hypthenemus Hampei, is one of the most significant pest problems for coffee farmers. The CBB is a black, two millimeter long, beetle that bores holes through the seeds coffee cherries. "Broca" is the widely used Spanish term for the coffee berry borer. CBB damage is also called "Broca damage".

 

Crushed

Crushed coffee beans are most commonly the result of improperly set or damaged pulping equipment. Coffee beans can also be crushed during mechanical separation of the beans from the husk, or during mixing in fermentation tanks.

 

Diseased

Disease damaged coffee beans. There are many coffee plant diseases that can damage a coffee crop, but most are caused by fungus (mold). The most prevalent coffee mold problems are Coffee Leaf Rust (CLR), which shows as yellow-orange blotches on the leaf, and Coffee Berry Disease (CBD), which lives in the bark of the tree and produces spores that attack the coffee cherries. CLR, CBD, and Coffee Berry Borer (CBB) are significant disease and pest problems facing the worlds coffee farmers.

 

Drought Affected

Ragged shaped, pale, and light weight unroasted coffee beans. Also called "droughty", or "flaky"

 

Elephant Beans

An cluster of two or more deformed beans that grew closely locked together, but sometimes separate during processing or roasting. Also called "ears", due to their often ear-like appearance.

 

Faded

Unroasted coffee beans that have lost much of their original color, a characteristic of old crop and beans that were dried too rapidly. Processed coffee beans will slowly fade from green to pale yellow, if stored too long before roasting. Also called "soapy" or "bleached".

 

Foxy

Unroasted coffee beans with a brown or rust color. Foxy beans may result from faulty fermentation, improper washing, over drying, or by harvesting over-ripe cherries. Also called "brown".

 

Moldy

Unroasted coffee beans with a light green or white fur-like texture characteristic of mold. Roasted coffee beans affected by mold have a "musty", or "moldy", flavor.

 

Mottled

Unroasted coffee beans with blotchy discolorations, associated with uneven drying during processing.

 

Musty

Taste or aroma characteristic of mold. A musty characteristic is associated with drying the coffee too slow or storing unroasted coffee in a damp environment. Monsooned and aged coffees may have a slightly musty flavor.

 

Over Fermented

Coffee allowed to ferment too long during wet processing. After de-pulping coffee cherries to remove the skin and some of the pulp, the separated seed will still have a significant amount of pulp attached. The remaining pulp can be loosened by fermentation, allowing it to be washed away before drying. If fermentation is not stopped as soon as the remaining parchment is no longer slimy, and has a rough texture, the coffee may acquire oniony or soury flavors.

 

Pales

Unroasted yellow coffee beans that stink when crushed or ground. Pales may result from drought or from harvesting immature coffee cherries.

 

Peaberry

A single rounded bean from a coffee cherry which bears one bean instead of the usual flat sided pair of beans. Also known as 'caracol', 'perla' and 'perle'. Peaberries are frequently separated and sold as a distinct variety. Papua New Guinea and Tanzanian peaberries are good examples.

 

 

Pulper Nipped

Wet processed beans that are cut or bruised during pulping. Typically caused by damaged or improperly configured pulping equipment. Pulper cut beans will usually show brown or black marks after processing. Discoloration develops by oxidation at the damaged areas and off-flavors may result. Pulper damaged beans roast unevenly, age rapidly, and are susceptible to damage by vapors, dust, and other adverse environments. Also called "blackish" or "pulper cut".

 

Quaker

Unripened coffee beans, often with a wrinkled surface. Quakers do not darken well when roasted.

 

Ragged

Coffee with a ragged appearance. Harvesting both mature and immature cherries, or drought-affected cherries, can result in beans with a ragged appearance.

 

Shell

ShellA common defect where coffee beans have a large cavity similar to a shell. While only a secondary concern, compared to defects such as stones, sticks, black beans, or sour beans, too many shells in a coffee sample is an indication of a lesser coffee grade.

 

 

Stinker

A coffee bean that produce an unpleasant or fowl taste. Beans that get stuck in a pulper or fermentation tank too long are may become stinkers. Stinker beans produce an unpleasant smell when crushed or cut. Stinker beans can spoil the taste of an otherwise good batch of coffee.

 

Under Dried

Beans with a moisture content above 12%. The final drying process should result in coffee beans with a 10% to 12% moisture content.

 

Withered

Wrinkled, undeveloped, and light weight coffee beans. Withered beans are typically the result of drought or poor husbandry.

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As other have said it's you coffee not the machine.

I use a Kurig with the grind your own filter and Trader Joe's Kona or Peaberry coffe. It took me a little while to get the grind size right. Once I figured it out, it makes a great cup of coffee. I don't make a whole pot since I'm the only one in the house that drinks it.

Although I have never tried it, I hear very good things about the Technivorm for making whole pots.

 

 

FYI bitter coffee is caused by the water being too hot or having too much contact with the water and grinds. i.e. too much steeping time or the grinds are too fine.

Fine grinds for espresso, water goes through fast under pressure.

Coarse grinds for French press long steeping time.

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I have experimented with 200 dollar coffee makers to making cowboy coffee on the range top. So far two ways rule:

 

French pressed

 

The old fashioned perk pot

 

I buy beans from two different places San Francisco Coffee Company French Roast about $13.99 for 3 lbs at Costco

 

Coffee Bean Exchange about $36.00 for 5 lbs on Amazon. French Roast

 

The only area I am lacking is my coffee grinder. I have a small Mr Coffee, my better one stopped working recently, and I am waiting for Black Friday and or after Christmas sales to buy a new one.

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I once had a Chemex maker but broke too many. Then switched to a press, but kept chipping those on the sink spout. I have tried  All kinds of beans including ones roasted locally, ground them myself... and after many  possible combinations of methods and products...the combination  I look forward to is ......


It is too finely ground for the press and blows past the plunger seal because it clogs the screen, but in the afternoon it is always a full cup from this machine.


18263051826304


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Ok guys ... It's the pot!

 

I got super beans that I know make a deep reach smooth cup from a UL Certified grind n brew machine at work , brand new bag!

 

Milled the cofee and I even sieved the grind using screens to make sure it was a uniform particle size, so no fines or big chunks ....golden ratio, full pot.

 

Result ... Sour cofee with now a bitter edge to it .

 

Something has to be up ... But if I have to fiddle with it ....the concept of automatic cofee is out of the equation .... This pot went back as well ., I blew through almost a pound of coffee trying to make a decent cup.,

 

I tried Melitta,,maxwell house, AP 8 o'clock , and these gorgeous medium roast Ethiopian beans that is top shelf and I know makes a great cup.

 

Back to the old way ... Which hoing back was considered the gold standard...

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I have a french press and have tried a variety of different beans with that. I grind immediately before I put them in the French press. Most of the time I have gotten a great cup of coffee. However, I just don't have the time for that! I use a Keurig day to day and I'm very happy with it, as long as I get the right K-cup. I have found that I prefer a bold, medium or dark roast. The only medium roasts I have found that I like in the K-cups is Newman's Own and Starbucks. We have been buying Kirkland (Costco Brand) Pacific Bold, for the cost but I really do like the coffee.

 

I don't know coffee like a lot of you guys do but I really like my coffee hot! Like just about burning my mouth hot. Any pot coffee maker I have ever used, was never able to achiece that. I was told a good part of why the coffee tastes better from my Keurig is due to brew temp.

 

Not trying to hijack the thread but what is the ideal brew and serving temp? Keurig can be set between 188-194F, I believe.

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Technivorm....expensive but quick and brews at optimum temp. They have models w heated pots or like this one w a thermal carafe.

 

1826346

 

 

Couple things. French roast tends to be a collection of all the low quality beans that are then over roasted disguising any nuances in the coffee and a lot of sins . While I like my campfire coffee done in a percolator there is no way that the coffee won't be over-extracted and sub-optimum. Fresh roasted might be more imp than fresh ground to the total flavor. I buy my coffee through the mail - it's roasted on Monday, delivered on Thursday. batdorf daught com It's not cheap but I buy no coffee of any any kind out side of this.

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