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flysully

CCG - still as popular as it was last year?

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Have a new kit which I haven't yet opened. Pondering whether to sell it or start using it in place of epoxy.

Since I already have the fly turning wheel, etc., just wondering if I need it at all. Have always been happy with my epoxy flies.

Do you fly tyers feel CCG offers an advantage over epoxy other than a quick set rather than drying on the wheel?

Kind of on the line about this before opening the package.

Comments appreciated.

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FlySully, I think nearly all of the new light curing agents are a step up over epoxy.

 

There will be a learning curve with using the CCG. For me, I use the hydro more than any other of the CCG stuff (e.g. Flex, thick, thin).

 

The fun thing about these new light curing agents is that you can use them in many new ways because of the near instantaneous curing times. Think Pete Gray's Phly Welding techniques.

 

Drying wheels still have their place - I use them for other things, not epoxy though. So no need to liquidate the wheel from your bench.

 

As long as you've been on the scene, you've seen all sorts of fads come and go, no doubt. My opinion, use the kit, if you don't like it, you can always sell a partially used kit or at best, never buy one again. Better to say you tried it and didn't like it rather than you never tried it but don't like it.

 

Good luck.

 

Kevin

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I have some 5 y/o flies using Tuffleye and they are just as yellow as the epoxy I have from back then. Neither really all that yellow but same tint.UV seems to accelerate yellowing.While less sticky,they still don't have a "clean" finish.



The coatings you have to put on to deal w/ the tackiness inherent to the light cures get worn off and return the fly to it's previously sticky condidtion.Maybe put some epoxy on it? lol....



The stuff still gets chipped off the fly on the rocks of Montauk.



Way more expensive than epoxy.



I'm not concerned about 5 min of my time.Tying flies takes patience and time.In todays push button,instant gratification oriented society it's OK w/ me if something takes a lil bit more time to get the result I want.



I'll stick w/ epoxy.It works well for me.


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One big advantage of UV resins is that they are much lighter than epoxy so you can use it on all sorts of flies, not just candies. You don't have to plaster the fly in resin. Tiny amounts hold materials in place and can prevent fouling. Which is why I use it most of my patterns. You can't even see its been used most of the time.

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I've been using CCG and Bug Bond for a little over a year and I really don't miss working with epoxy. Less messy, easier to control and the much shorter drying time. The tackiness is a bit of an issue. With poppers and crease flies, I find using some MOP transfer foil takes care of the tackiness and a light coat of one of the water based epoxy/polyurethanes like Liquid Fusion or Seal Coat thinned with water for a final seal.

Haven't been using it long enough to see if it yellows or bounced any flies off rocks or rip rap to see if the heads chip.

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I use the loon thick, and when I am done a batch of flies I leave them in the sun for a day on a big foam sheet, and the tack is completely gone within an hour or so of sunlight. One of the guys at the local shop left a candy out on the front step for a full year and it is as clear as the day he tied it, not even a hint of yellow. I don't have much epoxy experience, but during the winter months when I will easily tie 2-300 candy style flies and pile them up- I would hate for them to yellow before I get to use or hand some out.

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I have some 5 y/o flies using Tuffleye and they are just as yellow as the epoxy I have from back then. Neither really all that yellow but same tint.UV seems to accelerate yellowing.While less sticky,they still don't have a "clean" finish.

The coatings you have to put on to deal w/ the tackiness inherent to the light cures get worn off and return the fly to it's previously sticky condidtion.Maybe put some epoxy on it? lol....

The stuff still gets chipped off the fly on the rocks of Montauk.

Way more expensive than epoxy.

I'm not concerned about 5 min of my time.Tying flies takes patience and time.In todays push button,instant gratification oriented society it's OK w/ me if something takes a lil bit more time to get the result I want.

I'll stick w/ epoxy.It works well for me.

 

This is basically what I always assumed, thanks for the primary research.

 

I've never used any of the newer UV materials, but have chuckled about how they require 2 different coats. Sure the time needed to harden the first coat is small, but wiping, opening another bottle then applying a 2nd coat seems like you're giving it back. Add in the cost and you've just convinced me to stay with epoxy.

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Thanks, forum fly tiers, for your comments which are so appreciated.

I'm considering listing on the BST forum my CCG kit, which is brand new as a gift, and just sticking with epoxy for my flies which have always produced.

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Thanks, forum fly tiers, for your comments which are so appreciated.

I'm considering listing on the BST forum my CCG kit, which is brand new as a gift, and just sticking with epoxy for my flies which have always produced.

 

My 2 cents ... it's a mistake. The UV cured flies are better. They don't yellow from the clear cure ... they might yellow (but I haven't seen it) from the nail polish applied on top. Of course there are plenty of files that will work that have nothing to do with epoxy of any type. Old school flies are often best.

 

But i love the Surf Candy as any one on this forum knows.

 

Good luck in your fishing!

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I miss the yellowing of epoxy on my spearing imitation surf candies. :D

 

The UV clear goo is so much easier to use.

 

What a SNARKfish you are!! I can't count how flies that went through some sort of rehab because the yellowing was over whelming. But I do have a couple of squid arrow flies that actually look better (yellow / brown) because of epoxy aging.

 

The blue light / UV "epoxy" methods are MUCH better .... long (aging) and short term (tying time)!

 

Catch a Big One!!

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Slip N Slide send me your address in a PM. I will send you some flies done with TUFFLEYE that I promise you are not yellow , tacky , or will they EVER be tacky no matter what you do to them. The process is simple . Use a dry paper towel or barley dampened with alcohol to LIFT OFF the residue . Takes 30 seconds TOPS. Put a nice little coating of topcoat WHALA , DONE.. Fleyes are done start to finish in less then 5mins. REMEMBER when I first started using this I felt exactly the same as you. I wanted no part. BUT I was doing the process incorrectly. If done right you will see the light! :-) send me a PM with dat address so I can mail you a few flies to try and destroy. I am confident you will love these Ted! [img= 1000

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I do not know if CCG had this problem, but Tuffleye had metals in the mixture which reacted to Sally Hansen's. The problem was solved when they came out with the topcoat. Since then I have had no yellowing.

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Use the top coat. A bottle will last a looooooooog time. 100s and 100s of flies will be covered before you run out. Let's put it this way . I used 6 packages of a 100 plastic/ 600 sleeves to bag flies since early August. I have bought 2 bottles of TOPCOAT and one bottle of thinner. They last a long long time. Well worth the money . Forget Sally Hans , forget hard as hull, sure maybe they can be used but TOPCOAT is made for the job and works PERFECTLY, no issues whatsoever. TOPCOAT also DRIES VERY FAST , maybe 90seconds , really quick. I have gone threw a lot of tubes of TUFFLEYE CORE. Really, a good amount. 1 30cc syringe will get me probably close to 40 small candies. But honestly I have never counted , possibly more. It always seems as the tubes just never run out. Out of all these tubes and all these flies sent out I have had ZERO COMPLAINTS. Not one single negative remark about the coating, the durability of the fly , the clearness , or any yellowing. I said this once before. I am not a Prostaff member , I do not receive anything for free . I just simply am telling you my experiences using TUFFLEYE core, topcoat and the foils. When used correctly they make a fantastic , EASY , super durable , highly effective and most of all a really fun fly to tie! Give it a try you will really enjoy using it I believe. Last thing , DO NOT USE ALCOHOL swabs.. They do NOT LIFT OFF THE RESIDUE. They just push it around and it will still be there. When done using a absorbent paper towel like bounty, not the cheap stuff that feels like newspaper , soft absorbent paper towels ,,, once the residue is removed the fly WILL BE smooth, dry and completely sticky/tack FREE, NONE. This is when you will know you did it right. Touch the fly before you apply any topcoat. If there is still anything left get it off and always wipe in one direction. From the back of the hook to the eye of the hook. I'll stop preaching now. I just would like to see more guys having the same experience as I using these products. They really are something great. Have fun.

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