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Knight771

New Trap & Skeet Gun, Any Recommendations?

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I'm starting to look for a new Trap & Skeet gun, over under. I can spend about $1,500.00 I am undecided about what to get, new or used. For example, a Mossberg Silver Premium I could buy new but a Beretta Silver Pigeon I could get used.

 

Just looking for some recommendations as to what other people use and are happy with. Obviously I could get some $10,000 super duper with four barrel gauges to insert and silver trim, and art carving on the teak wood stock, etc. but I've been married for 40 years and want to keep it that way. ;)

 

For $1,500. what would you recommend?

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Tough bill to fill one because the two clay games have much different gun requirements and two in todays standards $1500 for a O/U new is near impossible to find in anything with any quality level at all. Skeet is a short barreled open choke game (which in competition is a 4 gauge event) where trap is a long sight plain (barrel) tighter choke game in 12ga. $1500 for a O/U will put you into the more used used market for Browning's and Berretta's which are both well made highly respected O/U's. I will not suggest one over the other because that is a personal thing and depends totally on what the individual shooter likes in a shotgun. Me I prefer the Brownings because they are heavier and tend to enhance my follow through on clay game shots. Berretta are generally lighter and many like that for getting on target faster. You will have to try them and see for yourself. Lookfor used guns with interchangeable choke tube's, with the barrel release still showing a slight to the right lock position, and for dual use or general clay game usage I would suggest a 28-30" barreled gun.

 

Good luck on your purchase........ there are a bunch of used o/u's out their in a world of different conditions. Every gun shop has a few and sites like Gun's International have literally pages and pages of them from sellers across the country.

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You can have a 100 guys recommend a gun but you'd have to shoulder and handle each one. My father shoots skeet and I know his friends all have what fits them. They are all Beretta fans so they have semi autos. I tag along sometimes and I do fine with my $500 Beretta compared to there $1500 Beretta. I shot a SxS better than I do an O/U. I haven't shot many o/u but the forearm felt narrow in my hand whereas the wider forearm of the SxS felt(sat) better in my hand. I grew up using an old SxS so im biased. lol. I see your local as well. Thee are some skeet/clay shoots in the general area and some will let you rent a gun (to see how it feels). some events will have professional shooters on hand so its always good to pick there brain. I only do it a couple times a year and its fun. I use the guns I hunt with, some of those guns are too pretty to drag thru the woods. unofficially I've heard some shoots don't like semi's b/c it ejects the shell and some guys don't clean up after themselves whereas the O/U guys have better control over there empties.

 

Take a ride up to sportsmen center and Cheyenne and see what they have on there racks(new and used) fondle them all. lol

 

Nick

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LBI there are a few reasons O/U's are preferred. They can save their reloads as you mentioned, for the more popular sporting clays game you can load different chokes and shot shells for the variance in target distance and size at a individual station, for skeet you have the same receiver and just change the barrels or gauge tubes and retain the same feel and sometime balance of the original 12g a setup....... then there are the bells and whistle guys who use these as bragging rights etc.... but for clay games in general o/u are popular for the reason they afford more versatility. But as we all know in guns.... versatility comes at a price(as does accuracy and quality) and that is the 2-10x the cost of a good semi which is also hard to find for $1500 new anymore in a target grade shotgun.We pay our money and deal with the limitations of what we chose... no one gun is best at all clay games....

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don't get me wrong I agree 100% percent. I use the same principle when hunting. if I do carry a double gun for small game the first shot for me is the most open choke(C or IC) I have the second shot will be mod or even full. the few times I've done it since I was limited to one barrel in my semi I just change up the shot loads or if time permits the choke tube. . its an interesting sport/hobby. I look at it as practice for hunting, my father and his friends don't really hunt anymore so for them IT IS their hunt. they go all out. golf cart with gun rack, cases of ammo on the back rack. seeing a couple guys on a golf cart with 6 or 8 guns and 350 rounds on the back is an eye opener for a noob to the sport like my self. lol.

 

Nick

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Nick, For me sporting clays over at M&M in NJ is addicting..... can't beat a world class Sporting clay facility. I just wish they were open year round ;)

 

Sporting clays anywhere is a hoot ..... I use trap and skeet as a sporting clays tune up game. I used to do both of these heavily but since moving to sporting clays many years ago these two games lost my interest

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Wish I could give a good review but the truth is I bought my Silver Pigeon because I simply wanted it, and I got the deal of a lifetime.

 

It doesn't make my any better of a shooter than my 35 year old Remington 1100.

 

But it looks nicer. :)

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The big difference between trap and skeet guns these days is most dedicated trap guns are set up to impact higher (built in lead) usually 80/20 or 70/30 pattern above point of aim, skeet guns are usually set up flat- 50/50.

 

For years typical skeet guns were short barreled, 26" O/U being most the most popular. The last 15 years or so, 30" and 32" guns have come to rule the roost and the price of 26" O/U guns are deeply depressed. For trap, 30" or 32" are most popular. Once again, the longer barrels are most popular. Serious folk use a 34" single barrel for 16y and Handicap and reserve the O/U for doubles only.

 

For an O/U or semi-auto, your best bet is try as many guns as you can, consider used guns to get the most for your dollars, especially if you want to add an adjustable comb to move point of impact up and down for different games. Browning and Beretta are good values in target guns. I'd stay away from low end O/U guns as durability, parts and service support are usually lacking. For a semi-auto, I believe Beretta remain the standard.

 

I have a great time shooting trap, skeet, sporting, and waterfowl with a 30" Ballistic Specialties Beretta 390 I bought in 1995 or 96 (ouch)- I clean it every 2000- 3000 rounds whether it needs it or not ;) and it just runs and runs.

 

:v:

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Also a dedicated clay gun is heavier than a field gun. A heavy gun with target loads is less recoil on your shoulder.

I use a o/u field gun for everything but have used a buddy's Ceasars Guerini clays gun a few times and it is very nice.

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I gather that Ruger Red Label O/U guns are not too loved here?

 

The older ones the o/u was heavy and clumsy. The new ones they released are much better. Wish I never parted was with the red label sxs I had. That was a great gun. Love the weatherbys as well. Also have a older silver pigeon. Got a mossberg in 20 for stomping brush. The pretty guns are only for the range

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I gather that Ruger Red Label O/U guns are not too loved here?

 

I put about 8K through mine before picking up the semi I'm still shooting. The trigger would get balky once in a while, not resetting for the second barrel. Back then, I shot every week with Ruger employees and it was taken to work, sorted out, and returned in 24 hours. The bigger problems with the gun were it was stocked like a field gun (open pistol grip, too much drop) and weighed like a target gun (almost 9 lbs), the wood to metal fit was way short of impressive, and even when new, the gun felt loose.

 

I haven't seen the new guns yet.

 

:v:

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