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BrianBM

Question on truck caps

44 posts in this topic

Not camper bodies, just caps. How watertight, or not watertight, can you expect them to be on a P/U that twists and flexes and bounces on a beach? If you have cargo that needs to be kept dry, are you best advised to keep them elevated off the truck bed? ... especially bedding, if you're hoping to sleep in the back.

 

???

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Put a rubber seal between the Cap and bed and you wont have an issue. I am on my 3rd truck with a rubber seals; rain is not an issue and I do sleep in the back on occasion.

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I had a fiberglass cap that let in a little water. My current truck has had an aluminum cap for the past year + and it has been bone dry.

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You'll have more issues w condensation, especially w alum shells, than leaks. A windy, rainy Montauk night w be a pia keeping the tail end dry as you climb in and out but other than that no real problems. My p/u all had 6'6" beds and I got along fine in cold, rainy or snowy weather and an 8' bed should be even better.

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Nice point. Is there such a thing as an insulated cap? ... Probably not. Condensation is probably best dealt with by making sure that the sleeping bag is well protected against drips, and perhaps elevated off the bed with an air mattress.

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Nice point. Is there such a thing as an insulated cap? ... Probably not.

 

Condensation is probably best dealt with by making sure that the sleeping bag is well protected against drips, and perhaps elevated off the bed with an air mattress.

 

Get a cap with slider windows. Mine has a slider in front & two on the sides. Having a little cross ventilation goes a long way towards controlling condensation. Sheet of plywood will get you up off the bed.

 

For a mattress, check Cabelas... they have fabric covered foam pad that they call a "camp mattress" or something. It is about 3" thick. Rolled up it is about the size of a water-heater, which sucks, but you will sleep like a baby on the thing. Foam provides some insulation that you really don't get from air mattresses. Runs about $100 and worth every cent.

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Nice point. Is there such a thing as an insulated cap? ... Probably not.

 

Condensation is probably best dealt with by making sure that the sleeping bag is well protected against drips, and perhaps elevated off the bed with an air mattress.

 

 

Fiberglass resists the condensation better than aluminum. Some mfg's offer vents in the cap roof, some w battery powered fans. Always have a roll of paper towels to wipe up the condensation off the windows, and window frames, to keep the drips to absolute minimum. Absolutely have to sleep off the bed, in the old days it was always 3/4" ply w carpet over that, plus whatever sleeping pads. My buddy used to bring a thin cot mattress that would roll up pretty small. Condensation and high humidity always make the bag seem a little damp so I'd often bring a "camp" sleeping bag and then have another down bag inside of the camp bag.

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A low rider cot works well, it keeps you off the truck bed surface and gives you some ventilation. If your cap has a 3rd brake light mounted above the rear glass make sure it's sealed well.  My Tacoma started to leak but I've since re-sealed the area where the screws come through. 


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The leaks that are likeliest would be from holes drilled for rod hangers to keep rods off the bed and hanging along the center, through the pass-through into the cab. That ought to make it possible to accommodate 11' - 12' rods and keep them inside while I sleep, so's they don't walk off. If I go that route, I'll get expert advice and probably installation; put a hole through the roof and through a backing plate, with a thick layer of sealant between roof and plate, and that way the load would be suspended from enough of an area so as not to permit motion and flexing to enlarge the hole with time.

 

Just thinking out loud.

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I like that idea. Treating the back of a P/U as a damp hole in the ground makes a ton of sense.

 

 

It's not that bad really. For rain and snow you'll need a source of heat and a fly. Setting up a chair, a propane heater or an open fire, and a cooking station makes even the worst weather tolerable.

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