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Pomatomus

Small boat suggestions for Little Peconic Bay

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I'm thinking of buying a small used metal boat for Peconic Bay, metal so it's easier to winch up on a trailer and low maintenance.  12' would be enough I think for fly fishing off Shelter Island and that



area, maybe with a 20 HP outboard. It would be nice to be on something reasonably steady enough to cast from on a low chop day.   I know Grumman makes some nice boats but aside from that 



I'm totally in the dark.  Any ideas out there for what to look for?  


Thanks guys,



Steve


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Any reason for not fiberglass? Carolina skiff makes a stable little boat and so does maritime skiff I have owned both ther bothe have nice platforms they make for the front of them for casting

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A 12 foot skiff is a bit small for any bay. Even if you only use it on flat calm days you still have to deal with boat wakes and you never know. Try to look in to something a bit bigger 15-17 you can still use a small out board on these and you will be a bit safer. I have a 16 foot. Aluminum polar Kraft that I love I've had it for 10 years I'm on my second outboard. I use it more then my Parker because it's so cheap to run.1000

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My local 2 cents:  


I keep a boat in Corey Creek, Southold.  From April through mid-October I fish the north side of Little Peconic Bay between Bouy 18 and Jessups Neck several times a week.  


I currently fish from a 1976 17-foot Boston Whaler with a 70 OMC on it, but for many years I fished the same territory from a 1966 (old-style cathedral hull) 13 footer with a 35.  Wind vs. tide at Jessups can be like Deadliest Catch, and I would venture there in either boat in almost any conditions.  


Running at speed in rough water in a small Whaler doesn't make for a comfortable ride, but careful steering, playing the throttle, and "tacking" upwind into the worst of it takes away much of the pre-deep-V Whalers' dreaded pounding and ride harshness.  The Whaler's build quality, simplicity, and buoyancy give me confidence to get out fishing in conditions that will keep nearly every other boat at the dock.  Small Whalers float high and stay dry when drifting except for an occasional waveslap.  They don't have much dry stowage, but their squarish hulls can accommodate an amazing volume of gear.  If you want a versatile small boat for other coastal activities, they are amazingly stable and draw little water, making them a good choice for diving, clamming, and crabbing.  


You will give up some weight advantage to an aluminum boat; a 13-foot Whaler Sport model weighs about 360 pounds, about twice what a 14-foot open aluminum boat weighs.  But when you add an engine, some fuel and safety gear, and maybe a 12-volt battery for lighting, winching the Whaler onto your trailer will require a very small additional effort, easily made up with a slightly longer trailer winch handle.         


Older Whalers are fairly inexpensive; older 13-foot cathedral hulls in less-than-pristine condition are downright cheap.  Unless they have been abused or severely neglected, the hulls are nearly indestructible, and the hardware and furniture are first rate.  

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Pomatomus, I have never been out on Peconic Bay, but as others have said if it is an open body of water a 12 or 13 ft may be too small.

You should look at the Duranautic 16 ft or at least a 14 ft.

I have a 14' that I often use on Raritan, Barnegat and Great Bays in NJ with no problems. Of course you must pick your days carefully.

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