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Question About Calculating A Reciprocating Engine's Displacement

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I am having an argument with a blogger on another website.

 

Is the following statement correct?

 

 

When we calculate a reciprocating engine's displacement, the stroke factor is the distance from the top of the compression ring at BDC to the top of the compression ring at TDC.

 

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The chamber doesnt end at the top of the ring at TDC, there's the area above that where the mixture is ignited. Does that count?

 

He's talking about the stroke, not the size of the chamber.

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He's talking about the stroke, not the size of the chamber.

 

the stoke factor in determining the displacement. I dont claim to be right, Im genuinely asking. seems to me you would include the entire combustion chamber.

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General definition at several sites, incl NHRA seems to be:

(BORE /2) SQUARED TIMES Pi TIMES STROKE.

 

Using the compression ring as described by OP seems to be one of several ways to measure STROKE and meet the above definition

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Never thought about it but at BDC wouldn't you measure from the bottom of the bottom ring and at TDC you would measure the top of the top ring for all cylinders and then do the math. I have been known to have been wrong once or twice before. :D

 

 

After reviewing it again.I would have to agree with your original post.

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