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Fishweewee Question

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I have the urge for a new handgun. Like a dummie, I sold my Glock 17gen 3 a while back.

 

I am torn between the Sig 226 and another 17. Have the Sig 220 and 290 RS (carry). For the price of the Sig, I can get a Glock and make several

improvements. I shoot both about the same.

 

Your opinion is requested. As well as others.

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Sold it in a moment of weakness. I was offered the right price at the wrong time.:mad:

Did not like the M&P. Just did not feel right when I shot it.

The HK I have not shot or the Walther. I do have the Walther in the .22 with suppressor. Nice little toy to plink with and well........

I have pretty much come back down to the Sig or Glock. I like the simplicity of the Glock, but not sure of which mods to make it more effective

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Ok.

 

I'd stick with a Gen 3 Glock 17.

 

The mods I would do are as follows. Except for the sights, the mods are pretty inexpensive individually.

 

1) New sights. The cheap plastic sights on the Glock are really just placeholders for better sights and Glock knows this. I suggest you check out Dawson Precision. You will need to figure out if you want standard height sights or something else. Shoot the factory sights first. If you are on target (use a ten shot group to assess) then stick with that sight height. Note the distance you are shooting at and SAVE YOUR TARGET. The great thing about Dawson Precision is that if you don't like your front sight you can send it in and get a different size one. There's a nice formula listed on DP's website that takes into account distance to target, sight radius and POA. Then there's sight width. Narrower is better for bullseye, a little wider gap in rear vs. front is for self defense. Then you have to figure out what you want in terms of color of sights. A tritium front with plain black rear is a good combo. Another setup that's pretty popular is all-black rear sights with a fiber optic front. Just understand that fiber optic is more brittle and you'll have to replace a few from time to time. Try to stay away from 3 tritium dot setups. At night your eye can only focus on one thing. The two tritium dots in the rear are a waste of money.

 

2) Grip Force Adapter for Glock. Gives you a nice beavertail, helps prevent slide bite, enhances draw speed.

 

3) Glockmeister grip plug. This prevents foreign material from getting into the grip well. This is the achilles heel of the Glock. If sand gets in that area, the gun will likely fail.

 

4) Tango Down Vickers Tactical Slide Stop. Patterned on the industry-leading M&P style slide stop.

 

5) Tango Down Vicker Tactical Extended Mag Catch. Nice and chunky for smaller hands. Be sure to match it Gen 3 or Gen 4 Glock - as the two are different.

 

Optional:

 

6) Ghost 3.5 lb. connector - helps reduce trigger pull to about 4 lbs.

 

7) Match grade barrel. Usually has to be fitted by a gunsmith.

 

Might as well get a

 

8) Glock armorer's tool. It's just a straight punch. It's important to use only a straight punch and not a tapered punch when removing pins from a Glock.

 

9) Extra factory recoil spring guide rod. Change every 3,000 rounds if Gen 3.

 

10) Lots o' mags. Stick with factory.

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Ok.

 

I'd stick with a Gen 3 Glock 17.

 

The mods I would do are as follows. Except for the sights, the mods are pretty inexpensive individually.

 

1) New sights. The cheap plastic sights on the Glock are really just placeholders for better sights and Glock knows this. I suggest you check out Dawson Precision. You will need to figure out if you want standard height sights or something else. Shoot the factory sights first. If you are on target (use a ten shot group to assess) then stick with that sight height. Note the distance you are shooting at and SAVE YOUR TARGET. The great thing about Dawson Precision is that if you don't like your front sight you can send it in and get a different size one. There's a nice formula listed on DP's website that takes into account distance to target, sight radius and POA. Then there's sight width. Narrower is better for bullseye, a little wider gap in rear vs. front is for self defense. Then you have to figure out what you want in terms of color of sights. A tritium front with plain black rear is a good combo. Another setup that's pretty popular is all-black rear sights with a fiber optic front. Just understand that fiber optic is more brittle and you'll have to replace a few from time to time. Try to stay away from 3 tritium dot setups. At night your eye can only focus on one thing. The two tritium dots in the rear are a waste of money.

 

2) Grip Force Adapter for Glock. Gives you a nice beavertail, helps prevent slide bite, enhances draw speed.

 

3) Glockmeister grip plug. This prevents foreign material from getting into the grip well. This is the achilles heel of the Glock. If sand gets in that area, the gun will likely fail.

 

4) Tango Down Vickers Tactical Slide Stop. Patterned on the industry-leading M&P style slide stop.

 

5) Tango Down Vicker Tactical Extended Mag Catch. Nice and chunky for smaller hands. Be sure to match it Gen 3 or Gen 4 Glock - as the two are different.

 

Optional:

 

6) Ghost 3.5 lb. connector - helps reduce trigger pull to about 4 lbs.

 

7) Match grade barrel. Usually has to be fitted by a gunsmith.

 

Might as well get a

 

8) Glock armorer's tool. It's just a straight punch. It's important to use only a straight punch and not a tapered punch when removing pins from a Glock.

 

9) Extra factory recoil spring guide rod. Change every 3,000 rounds if Gen 3.

 

10) Lots o' mags. Stick with factory.

That's a lot of modifications and junk.

 

Why not just get a 1911 and call it a day?

 

:mess:

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After definitively making sure the gun is clear one can shine a flashlight inside the chamber and peer down to inspect the barrel for condition.

 

Alternately one can use a thumb with the nail facing up.

 

Optimally you would want to remove the barrel from the gun for inspection.

 

Photo's like that, especially without any context or explanation, paint an undeserved negative light.

 

Any other questions?

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