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Let's Talk about Shop Ventilation

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I'm curious how you guys are ventilating your woodshops. I do most of my epoxy work indoors, since in the winter, it's far too cold to cure epoxy outside, even with a heatbox. That being said, these fumes are horrendous, and will give me a mighty headache if I don't use an respirator. I'm wondering how you guys ventilate your shops to try and carry some of the fumes away. While the respirator helps, waiting for these fumes to clear can take a while in a closed space.

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I use my sprabooth with the duct going out the basement window, mix the etex there and the spinner close will ventilate the area very well, no smell at all. I open one of the windows on the opposite of the basement to create an air flow.

home depit have everything you'll need. google spray booth.

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I bought a portable spray booth with fan online.  Not too expensive.  You can also make one.

 

I'm seeing a few online. How portable is "portable?" Could I easily move it off the work bench when not in use? Or is it really a hassle?

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No way around it...respirator when you are mixing and applying. No way around winter either. Homemade setups can work fine but for every cubic foot of expensive heated air going out...fresh heated air needs to come in. If you are working in the same vicinity of a furnace or other vented heater it can cause the appliance to vent into the room if you create too much negative pressure. Would not worry with a small fan though, but it is a good idea to crack a window on the other side of the room...you can get away with sucking out less air with a smaller fan if you have  good cross ventilation with make up air.


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1822268

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My issue was how to keep the cold air out when not in use...the yogurt tub is filled with towels and when I pull the rod and it wedges into a an old dryer vend adaptor. makes a air tight seal. when I want to use it ,just push the rod and let the plug hang there . I replace the window with a acrylic sheet and wood frame to mount the dryer vent adaptor. I have two old bathroom fans hooked up to it ...works great

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LOL Winch !

 

Here in the winter it goes down to -30 or more. If we open the door for more than a few seconds we might as well just move outside because the cold comes in like a flood and it takes hour to reheat the house. Must be nice to live in sunny California :D;):D

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I think I saw what Mike3dr is talking about. If I am correct it is best used for airbrush painting. Not if it is good for mixing other chemicals.

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I think I saw what Mike3dr is talking about. If I am correct it is best used for airbrush painting. Not if it is good for mixing other chemicals.

 

It's definitely not what it's designed for, but I'm looking into one to at least create airflow in my 1 window, no door basement. A little airflow is better than none.

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Quote:

Originally Posted by madcaster View Post

1822268

1822269

1822270

My issue was how to keep the cold air out when not in use...the yogurt tub is filled with towels and when I pull the rod and it wedges into a an old dryer vend adaptor. makes a air tight seal. when I want to use it ,just push the rod and let the plug hang there . I replace the window with a acrylic sheet and wood frame to mount the dryer vent adaptor. I have two old bathroom fans hooked up to it ...works great



Very clever engineering. I'm sure it works very well!  I too live in So Cal and yes, it is nice, but it can get cold here too, despite what we would have everyone believe. Last winter I remember it getting down in the sixties and had I not had my mucklucks and parka I might have froze. Anyhow, this may work well in my attic workspace. Thanks for sharing.


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Slow curing coatings are very difficult in cold weather. It is easy to vent out overspray. I run the exhaust while spraying  and cycle it on and off for the hours of curing so fumes do not accumulate. Usually go out and split wood or something to keep me close by but occupied to  monitor the process and know when it is safe to leave it for the day. In summer ....just let the fan run. Always important to superheat the space and mass within ....80-90 degrees for a few hours before applying. That way the core temps keep coatings from failing as ambient temperature recovers quickly if you are bringing in 10 degree air to ventilate. Epoxies and catalyzed coating like heat too and will flow out better with less solvent popping at the higher temps as well.


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Slow curing coatings are very difficult in cold weather. It is easy to vent out overspray. I run the exhaust while spraying  and cycle it on and off for the hours of curing so fumes do not accumulate. Usually go out and split wood or something to keep me close by but occupied to  monitor the process and know when it is safe to leave it for the day. In summer ....just let the fan run. Always important to superheat the space and mass within ....80-90 degrees for a few hours before applying. That way the core temps keep coatings from failing as ambient temperature recovers quickly if you are bringing in 10 degree air to ventilate. Epoxies and catalyzed coating like heat too and will flow out better with less solvent popping at the higher temps as well.

 

Definitely. I have a dedicated, superheated space/container that runs 90-100 degrees in which I cure my epoxy coatings. This container is fairly well contained, so once the plugs are inside, any leakage of fumes are almost unnoticeable. The issue I have is more working outside that space before hand, when I'm mixing and applying my finish. I really like the portable spray booth idea. While they may not have been designed for chemical use, the fan should still create airflow from the outside. The issue with my work space is that it is in a basement with only a single window, no doors. The basement is sectioned off, with half being a finished, walled off living area, and the other being a woodshop/all purpose work area. I think what I may end up doing is purchasing the spray booth, and running the hose out that single window. I may also set up another fan in front of the booth to try to push as many of the fumes as possible through the vent and out the window.

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